#1
Hey. So, I've been learning some theory recently (and enjoyed it tbh) and theres one thing about scale modes i want to ask.

So, as far as i know, for example: Gmajor = A dorian = B phrygian = C lydian = D mixolydian = E minor = F# locrian.

all these modes has same notes, right? So if I will learn all the major scales, I will automaticaly know all the modes? or I'm getting something wrong? ^.^

Cheers
#2
As far as the notes that are in the scales, yes. But scale-wise, each mode sort of has it's own pattern.

Hope that helps, I feel like I may be misunderstanding your question...
#3
They have the same notes yes, but the tonal centre.. where they start and finish is different. and so like Chris said, there are actually some specific scale shapes for modes.
#4
While the mode is determined by the tonal centre, most of the time guitarists seem to disregard the fact that it is almost exclusively the chord progression that determines the root. Simply focusing on the g in a C major progression doesn't make your melody mixolydian. My advice is to ignore the modes and just play the diatonic scale, as it has been sufficient for almost any popular music in the last century, as well as in a lot of classical music. Pure modal music is almost exclusively medieval or liturgical.
Last edited by In The Flesh at Nov 28, 2009,
#5
Each mode serves a purpose, and that purpose is up to the user. For instance, The Locrian mode is the same as the Aeolian mode (Natural Minor) but with a minor 2 and dim 5. This serves purposes in metal, in rock or in a jazz situation.

Also, when you refer to modes, you refer to them by the tonal center, not the relationship of the notes. For instance, G Dorian has the same notes as A Ionian, but has G as the tonal center and B Locrian has all the same notes as C Ionian, but with B as the tonal center.

A way to remember the modes is

I (Ionian)
Don't (Dorian)
Punch (Phrygian)
Like (Lydian)
Muhammad (Mixo-Lydian)
A (Aeolian)
Li (Locrian)
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#6
Quote by In The Flesh
While the mode is determined by the tonal centre, most of the time guitarists seem to disregard the fact that it is almost exclusively the chord progression that determines the root. Simply focusing on the g in a C major progression doesn't make your melody mixolydian. My advice is to ignore the modes and just play the diatonic scale, as it has been sufficient for almost any popular music in the last century, as well as in a lot of classical music. Pure modal music is almost exclusively medieval or liturgical.


No it isn't. Lociran modes are used in metal. Aeolian is the minor mode. Dorian is used in jazz to finish a phrase. Locrian is also used on a dim 5 chord in jazz. Mixo is used over the V chord in blues and in jazz. These are simple forms of modulations that you are allowed to play vertically and change with each chord. And for the record, all popular music is the same, and it is crap.
I am the only sane person on the planet. Does that make me crazy?

Crank the Mids
#7
Quote by Zyrnis

all these modes has same notes, right? So if I will learn all the major scales, I will automaticaly know all the modes?


Yes, but applying them is a whole different story.
#8
Quote by Bluesy...
No it isn't. Lociran modes are used in metal. Aeolian is the minor mode. Dorian is used in jazz to finish a phrase. Locrian is also used on a dim 5 chord in jazz. Mixo is used over the V chord in blues and in jazz. These are simple forms of modulations that you are allowed to play vertically and change with each chord. And for the record, all popular music is the same, and it is crap.

Locrian is hardly ever used in anything.
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#9
Quote by Bluesy...
No it isn't. Lociran modes are used in metal. Aeolian is the minor mode. Dorian is used in jazz to finish a phrase. Locrian is also used on a dim 5 chord in jazz. Mixo is used over the V chord in blues and in jazz. These are simple forms of modulations that you are allowed to play vertically and change with each chord. And for the record, all popular music is the same, and it is crap.


A single modal phrase doesn't make a piece modal. There's a vast difference between the use of "flavour" notes, which most guitarists refer to as modes, and a strictly modal piece. A modal piece cannot contain other notes than those in the mode, and the chords can only be modal as well. The concept of modes is obsolete and it's easily surpassed by the diatonic scale.