#1
I'm trying my hardest to learn jazz and all i'm doing is watching random people on youtube play.

Can anybody suggest a Guitarist who does a solo in mostly every song?

A jazz band would do


I need a scale that has a jazz sound to it. All I can play is blues and metal, and i'm going through the same runs. I seen people use an index and pinky alot, and not really use the middle. Any scales like that?
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#2
try a combination of dorian and minor pentatonic. personally i think almost all jazz guitarists suck, maybe listen to miles davis or john coltrane for inspiration.
So do you have anything interesting to play?
#4
Wes Montgomery, Charlie Christian, Pat Martino, Django Reinhardt, Joe Pass, Pat Metheny, John McLaughlin, Bill Frisell, John Scofield, Kurt Rosenwinkel, John Ambercrombie, Mike Stern, Allan Holdsworth

Buncha different styles, all great guitarists, all great soloists
EDIT
Quote by Eclectia
personally i think almost all jazz guitarists suck

Ignore this guy, he doesn't know what he's talking about
Last edited by The Horror! at Nov 28, 2009,
#5
You could try transcribing sax solos, I seem to recall reading about Ritchie Blackmore doing that.
...I like metal.
#6
Quote by Eclectia
personally i think almost all jazz guitarists suck

^ I would suggest ignoring that bit of foolishness.


TS, check out guys like..

Wes Montgomery
Allan Holdsworth
John Abercrombie
John Scofield
Pat Metheny
Django Reinhardt


These are just a few that I could think of, but there are lots of great jazz players to listen to and be inspired by.
shred is gaudy music
#7
Learn how jazz music is constructed first, not what scales they use. Lots of changes in and between scales.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#9
Jazz is a complex genre, so there really isn't a one scale fits all approach. If you are looking to add a jazz tinge to your blues playing then I suggest you take a look at the Dorian Mode; Robben Ford and Larry Carlton are well known for using this in a minor blues context and the major 6th will add a sweet, sophisticated sound to your blues playing. The other point to make here is that you will really need to be following the chord changes with your lead as these 'extra' notes will not sound good over every chord in a progression so you run the risk of sounding like you don't know what you are doing.

Firstly, lets take a look at the notes on a standard minor blues progression:

Am7 - A C E G
Dm7 - D F A C
Em7 - E G B D

Assuming we now have our A Dorian Scale ready to play, the added 6th (F#) sounds good over the Am7 chord, however, when the Dm7 chord arrives we already have an F note in there as the minor 3rd so the F# will clash - of course to avoid this you could switch to the D dorian mode, however, if you have never tried following the changes before this will be prohibitively difficult. The best thing to do here is practice adding the major 6th whenever the Am7 chord arrives and using your standard pentatonic vocabulary for all the other chords. This will get you used to listening out for the changes. The F# will also work fine over the Em7 chord and will imply an Em9 chord but you should note that in this context the F# is now functioning as the 9th and not the major 6th.

In terms of listening to jazz guitarists I would suggest:

Larry Carlton
George Benson
Norman Brown
Pat Metheny
Wes Montgomery
John McLaughlin
Joe Pass

You might also like to try listening to:

Michael Brecker - Sax
Chick Corea - Piano
Joe Sample - Piano
#10
Firstly, lets take a look at the notes on a standard minor blues progression:

Am7 - A C E G
Dm7 - D F A C
Em7 - E G B D

Assuming we now have our A Dorian Scale ready to play


The A natural minor scale would be appropriate for the entire progression.
A better example might be "All of Me."

|| CM7 | CM7 | E7 | E7 | A7 | A7 | Dm | Dm || etc.

C Major scale, E Mixolydian (alt 5,9), A Mixolydian (alt 5,9) D Dorian.

As each new chord is played a new "scale" is introduced.

See if any of this helps.

http://www.youtube.com/user/ReverendTFunk
#11
Quote by revtfunk
The A natural minor scale would be appropriate for the entire progression.
A better example might be "All of Me."

|| CM7 | CM7 | E7 | E7 | A7 | A7 | Dm | Dm || etc.



Hmmm, I was showing a way to jazz up a minor blues as it was a context he the OP said he was familiar with. Plus, there is no reason why you have to pick one scale for an entire progression.
#13
....unless, of course, a single scale is most fitting to all the chords in the context of the progression....

Suggesting an A dorian scale when the key is obviously A natural minor would be adding to his confusion.
#15
Just to give you an idea of what the young guys in jazz guitar are doing:

Kurt Rosenwinkel - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0YBH0U0TT8

Mike Moreno - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDNzOnp4rmA

Gilad Hekselman - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x5-Oa7f7dZM&feature=related

Jonathan Kreisberg - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1s2IGS8HHEQ

There are plenty more to look up, but you'll find out about them as you start to dig around more.
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#17
Pat Metheny. He's so good, he's actually discovered secret notes.

TIME


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