#1
so im not sure if im naming this right but i believe i heard at one time this guy lowered his "action" on this guitar to play better or easier.

i asked him why he did it and he said it allows you not to have to press so hard on the strings to make a note.

so my question is is this normal to do for guitar players? why do they need to do it in the first place when the guitar should be set up already to play? does it really make guitar playing easier? how do i know if i need to do something to mine?
#2
yes it is incredibly regular and pretty much all it does is make your strings closer to the fretboard.
#3
If you feel comfortable the way your guitar feels now then don't think about action
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#4
if i understood correctly he lowered his bridge setup so the strings are closer to the frets. Yes its not weird to do so and it really is easier to play...because you dont have to apply as much pressure to make a note sound clearly.

By doing that you will see an immense difference right away on your playing..you will be able to play faster because u will have to apply less pressure , you wont get tired as easily and etc etc.

But i wouldnt recommend it because after playing on this guitar, if you switched to an acoustic it would seem like a world of difference (and by all means it IS! :P)..better leave it as it is so you can strengthen your fingers as much as possible.
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#5
On a classical or acoustic guitar, changing the action is a lot harder then changing it on an electric guitar. It involves taking out the saddle and sanding it down (im pretty sure) whereas on an electric guitar its just a few screws to turn.

Although, most acoustic guitars come set up with good action and unless your strings venture very far from the fretboard, i wouldnt worry about it too much.
#6
your guitar's action is the space between the strings and the frets.

this is pretty normal. a lot of players (electric and acoustic) prefer lower action. i definitely do. basically the shorter the distance you have to press the string down to hit the fret, the less effort. so if your action is lower, playing will be slightly easier. it's all preference though, like i said before. a lot of slide guitar players love high action.
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#8
to help better understand my guitar set up, i have an acoustic guitar. ive gotten alot of strength training from pressing hard and such on it so i think lowering my action would help me because im having a really really really hard time trying to do bar chords and i know i have all the strings down but its killing me to keep it down.

so with know, do you think lowering on an acoustic is a good idea?

are there any cons on a acoustic?

how long and how much would it cost to do this if i decided to do this?
#9
Regarding lowering the action on an acoustic, its normally not the best idea because its so easy to have the guitar produce to much fret buzz if you lower it any at all (It was at an ungodly high spot)

With electrics most of the fret buzz can only be heard when the guitar is not plugged in.
#10
^ I disagree wholeheartedly, in fact, enough to call that terrible advice.

Lowering the action is a completely necessary part of the set-up. Obviously, care needs to be taken to make sure that the action is not too low as to cause fret buzz. However, I do not find the risk of having to spend $10 on a new saddle reason enough not to make the guitar comfortable to play.

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#11
Quote by roamingbard13
^ I disagree wholeheartedly, in fact, enough to call that terrible advice.

Lowering the action is a completely necessary part of the set-up. Obviously, care needs to be taken to make sure that the action is not too low as to cause fret buzz. However, I do not find the risk of having to spend $10 on a new saddle reason enough not to make the guitar comfortable to play.




Way to shoot me down lol.

I was in understanding that TS was going to do it himself, which all of my buds that have tried and had no idea what they were doing ****ed up the action and had to go pay to have it done in the end anyway.
#12
Sorry about that, I didn't mean to come off as that harsh.

If you have the proper instructions, it is not a difficult task...

Here are some good instructions (point your friends here next time! It is a great website. I have followed these successfully several times).

http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Musician/Guitar/Setup/LowerAction/loweraction01.html

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#13
lol yeah i dont plan on doing this myself. i got a music shop im going to bring it to to do it
#14
Quote by roamingbard13
Sorry about that, I didn't mean to come off as that harsh.

If you have the proper instructions, it is not a difficult task...

Here are some good instructions (point your friends here next time! It is a great website. I have followed these successfully several times).

http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Musician/Guitar/Setup/LowerAction/loweraction01.html



Np dude, and thanks for the link maybe I will actually have a crack at my guitar now.
#15
action on an acoutic can be adjusted at the bridge or the nut, if your action is really high at the first few frets than you gotta file down your nut, i dont suggest trying this though...
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#16
Quote by obeythepenguin
A lot of guitars only have minimal factory setup -- they'll do enough that the thing's playable, and that's about it. Even on guitars with a good factory setup, a lot of players will adjust it for personal preference.

I've never had to adjust mine, but then again my main instrument is an acoustic bass that tears mere mortals' fingers right up, so I wouldn't notice it anyway. Basically adjust it if it gets uncomfortable to play, or if you have lots of fret buzz, etc.


To add to what you've said...

Most guitar manufacturers actually leave the action rather high. This is because each player's needs are very different. Some may need it higher because they do low alternate tunings, some may need it lower, in which case they can adjust it to their own liking.

Lowering the action usually requires you to shave off the underside of the saddle and/or the nut grooves. You can always shave down, but you can never add more material if you make it too low. That's why factory setups are usually quite high.
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#17
well, you can't add more material but you can shim the nut or saddle up.

all our guitars except my parlor were lowered at the nut and the saddle by having a tiny amount sanded at the bottom of each. it takes patience and very very fine sandpaper, and unless you're a handyman sort, is probably better left to a professional.

i had all but given up playing the guitar because my hands just don't get stronger (and it's been decades) but after playing guitars with lower action, i'm back to playing like mad.

oh, if the guitar tech you choose doesn't ask you what kind of music and guage of strings you use when you take your guitar to have the action lowered, take your guitar elsewhere. those are important things to know since the very low action i prefer would buzz for someone who strums hard, and the action for someone who strums hard wouldn't be low enough for me. and the string tension affects how low the action should be as well. but don't cue your tech - see if he asks. if he doesn't, you'll know it's time to find a new guy to work on your guitars.
#18
^ Yup. You can shim, but the contact with the saddle and guitar isn't as good. I would generally suggest just getting a new saddle if it gets that low. Might as well upgrade to some nice Fossilized Ivory or Bone.
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#19
totally agree

Quote by captivate
^ Yup. You can shim, but the contact with the saddle and guitar isn't as good. I would generally suggest just getting a new saddle if it gets that low. Might as well upgrade to some nice Fossilized Ivory or Bone.
#20
i recommend not lowering the bridge/changing the action and learning the barre chord as it is. that's probably the best course of action because if you hit a bump down the line, you aren't going to think it's you that needs work, but it's the guitar.
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#21
Well, i have two guitars, one has teh action normal how i bought it (high) and i use that classie to practice and i have another one to perform.

The same thing i do with my electric, here theres people that dont know a bout adjusting the action and neck relief and such so they think because i have a killer high action on my electric they think it will damage it and still cant explain why i can play it easly :x

If you feel confy with the height of your strings then leave it as it is. Theres really not MAJOR need to have your action lowered.
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#22
Hate it when I get to threads long after all the good points have been made
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