#1
I'm in a Rock covers band that is wanting to use a twin lead style. I've never been in a band before so it's a steep learning curve and when it comes to solos I need some help and advice. So far, I have basically just noodled on a Pentatonic so it all kinda fits but it's not exactly inspiring stuff. The other guitarist in the band is a real shredder and I don't want to do that for two very good reasons:

1) I simply can't play that fast and I doubt I ever will
2) I think it would work better if we each had a distinct sound and style

I've therefore come to the conclusion that I should adopt a more melodic approach to my solos but I'm not sure how to go about it. I can hear solos in my head but unfortunately can't seem to find the appropriate notes on the guitar fast enough. My initial thought is that I should try moving away from just a Pentatonic scale and focus more on the Major and Minor scales. My only concern with that is that, like I am with Pentatonics, I'll end up getting trapped in boxes. My other idea is to simply abandon theory and simply practice by just going where the mood takes me and find what works by trial and error. For those of you who can play this melodic style, how would you advise me to go about it?
Gibson Les Paul Studio with Catswhiskers pickups
PRS SE 'Floyd' Custom 24 with Creamery pickups
Fender Standard Stratocaster with DiMarzio pickups
Takamine GN30
BluGuitar AMP1
#2
Have a few preset ideas or motifs (basically lick ideas) that you can incorporate into your solos. Have an idea of where you want to go and what you want to avoid as you enter into your solo. Don't be deer in the headlights and when the time comes to your solo, don't think "oh crap, which notes sound good in this key?"
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#3
So I take it you mean play more by instinct than by the theory of which scales will work. Today I tried working on a solo to go into UFO's Doctor Doctor. I started by bending into the root note so it had a strong start and then I simply tried to go with whatever was in my head and tried to find it on the neck. It took a long time before I had enough to go over the chord progression of a verse and a chorus but despite this, the finished product did sound really good. It certainly wasn't something that I could play as an improvisation as the process took so long but perhaps if I keep doing things like this it will start to become more instinctive.
Gibson Les Paul Studio with Catswhiskers pickups
PRS SE 'Floyd' Custom 24 with Creamery pickups
Fender Standard Stratocaster with DiMarzio pickups
Takamine GN30
BluGuitar AMP1
#4
The thing is if you listen to a lot of stuff and have the slightest bit of musical instinct about you then "where the mood takes you" is invariably going to revolve around what you're most familiar with ie the major and minor scales - therefore to be able to succesfully get that mood out onto the fretboard you're still going to benefit amazingly from srtudying your theory.
Actually called Mark!

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