#1
im not really sure, all i know i want to play my guitar to make a living. im going to be taking a diploma in college and then im going to try and take a degree in university (this is in England by the way, college is different here to America, although i do plan on living in America) degree being in guitar. i don't really know what im asking, im guess im asking what kind of job could i get as a musician in America in the near future, estimated. with a degree in guitar


and im not a F**king immigrant


better shred than dead
#2
Teaching, both lessons and classes. Sessional musician, bar band?
#3
what about the kind of musician that writes music for tv ads and movies and tv shows, theme songs, etc what kind of qualifications would you need for that
better shred than dead
#4
start a band (put out an album tour the world sell merchandise)repeatx10 be as rich as metallica
done
"Sign your guitar? I'll sign your arse if you want me to!" - Herman Li, at a guitar clinic in Malaysia

#5
Quote by ShredFlame
start a band (put out an album tour the world sell merchandise)repeatx10 be as rich as metallica
done



yeah you also have to be as famous as metallica to do that as well
better shred than dead
#6
that comes with like advertisement and shit,, i just included the main points
"Sign your guitar? I'll sign your arse if you want me to!" - Herman Li, at a guitar clinic in Malaysia

#7
Quote by ShredFlame
that comes with like advertisement and shit,, i just included the main points


Yeah you basically hit the nail on the head there. It's a wonder why bands aren't more or atleast as successful as Metallica when it's really, that easy.
#8
Quote by shredda2084
what about the kind of musician that writes music for tv ads and movies and tv shows, theme songs, etc what kind of qualifications would you need for that

You don't need any qualifications. You just need to be proficient on your instrument to a professional level, and decent with people.

What's a professional level? Few mistakes. Clear delivery. Appropriate tone.

Of course even the pros will make mistakes, but it's a competetive world, and the person who fulfills these criteria most consistently will be chosen for the job. You don't have to be a shredder, you just have to be able to play properly.

You might get a job by just introducing yourself to everybody you can get a hold of, but it is true that who you know is very important. You might want to do a short or long course at one of the modern music colleges like BIMM, ACM, ICMP, Guitar-X etc to meet people; and it does help to be in a city.

Writing for TV etc is unlikely to be your first paid job: you'll probably have to do a string of gigs with a variety of people to gain a decent reputation. But if you want the job, don't just turn up on the BBC's doorstep or whatever with a business card. Find out who's in which job, who you know, and contact people on a one-to-one basis, listing your credentials (experience and/or qualifications).

There are loads of gigs in the industry that require players of a range of styles and capabilities. There are some musicians who therefore try to be a jack of all trades (which is fine, as long as you do them well), or an expert in one or two types of music. Examples of these could be Carl Verheyen and Nile Rogers.

Just remember to never limit yourself, and don't turn down a job if you think you could probably do it. Musicians these days are freelance people, and most of them have worked in a dozen different areas of the industry (sync, library music, bands, West End productions, teaching, engineering, producing etc). Some are very lucrative but short-term, some are fairly low-paid but long-term and reliable. You'll have to find your own way around a lot of the time, and a lot of it is about socialising (buying people a pint in other words). Don't think that you'll just be swanning into the studio each day and leaving with a fat cheque, unless you get established in Nashville.

Just remember that as in a lot of industries, there are plenty of people waiting to rip off a rookie. Get everything in writing before you start playing, and don't expect royalties from most of the tracks you play on. And have fun - remember, you could be an accountant ....
#9
Performing artist, session musician, general business musician, or a guitar teacher. Those are just a few.
#10
Quote by blue_strat
You don't need any qualifications. You just need to be proficient on your instrument to a professional level, and decent with people.

What's a professional level? Few mistakes. Clear delivery. Appropriate tone.

Of course even the pros will make mistakes, but it's a competetive world, and the person who fulfills these criteria most consistently will be chosen for the job. You don't have to be a shredder, you just have to be able to play properly.

You might get a job by just introducing yourself to everybody you can get a hold of, but it is true that who you know is very important. You might want to do a short or long course at one of the modern music colleges like BIMM, ACM, ICMP, Guitar-X etc to meet people; and it does help to be in a city.

Writing for TV etc is unlikely to be your first paid job: you'll probably have to do a string of gigs with a variety of people to gain a decent reputation. But if you want the job, don't just turn up on the BBC's doorstep or whatever with a business card. Find out who's in which job, who you know, and contact people on a one-to-one basis, listing your credentials (experience and/or qualifications).

There are loads of gigs in the industry that require players of a range of styles and capabilities. There are some musicians who therefore try to be a jack of all trades (which is fine, as long as you do them well), or an expert in one or two types of music. Examples of these could be Carl Verheyen and Nile Rogers.

Just remember to never limit yourself, and don't turn down a job if you think you could probably do it. Musicians these days are freelance people, and most of them have worked in a dozen different areas of the industry (sync, library music, bands, West End productions, teaching, engineering, producing etc). Some are very lucrative but short-term, some are fairly low-paid but long-term and reliable. You'll have to find your own way around a lot of the time, and a lot of it is about socialising (buying people a pint in other words). Don't think that you'll just be swanning into the studio each day and leaving with a fat cheque, unless you get established in Nashville.

Just remember that as in a lot of industries, there are plenty of people waiting to rip off a rookie. Get everything in writing before you start playing, and don't expect royalties from most of the tracks you play on. And have fun - remember, you could be an accountant ....



thank you
better shred than dead
#11
If you are determined to live in America, then there's a whole different side you have to look into. I don't know a whole lot about this, but the company I work for (in computer animation, guitar is my side thing/passion) occassionally brings people from overseas and the visa process is a bitch. So be sure to look into what professional/educational qualifications you would need to qualify for a work visa.
#12
Quote by shredda2084
what about the kind of musician that writes music for tv ads and movies and tv shows, theme songs, etc what kind of qualifications would you need for that

Composition, I'd think. But with alot of musical careers like that, luck is a huge part of it, as is knowing the right people.
Nine planets surround the sun
Only one does the sun embrace
Upon this watered one
So much we take for granted


So let us sleep outside tonight
Lay down in our mother's arms
For here we can rest safely
#13
Quote by avery5150
Performing artist, session musician, general business musician, or a guitar teacher. Those are just a few.

This, plus guitar tech(if your good with repairing/modding guitars) either touring with a band, or working for whatever bands are playing at the venue you work at.
Quote by IRISH_PUNK13
The grandmother is having a baby with her grandson, so the grandson will be his own fathers father, the baby will be his own grandfather, and grandson, and the grandmother will be the mother, and great grandmother?

Quote by TheBurningFish
ಠ_ಠ
#14
I can tell you what I want to do.. :P might be inspiring.

I want to teach guitar at a school or privately on a few days of the week (maybe 3)
Then on other days rehearse in any bands I'm in or work on any of my projects
Then on some other days or this may interfere with me working on my own projects (but not band commitments) I want to be a sessional musician.
At nights I want to do some gigging and little jazz bars or small venues.
#15
Herm... I never really think about things like this... well u should just go with it... try to make ur own music along the way... just in case u can be like Dave wiener... just by being in the right place and at the right time... now he's playing alongside Steve Vai...