#1
Rather than posting individual songs and asking for mixing advice on each one, I was wondering if anyone here knows of a source for improving your mixing ability, as in books, tutorials, videos, general advice if you are good at it, anything. Most of the threads I see here are more instructional on how to use different software and gear; I know pretty well how to use my recording program (Audition) and when I dont know something I can generally figure it out. I need to become better at balancing the different elements of my music but I really dont know where to start. If you want an idea of what I can do, theres alot of music on my profile, specifically the most recent 5 songs. (not looking for critiques on them in this thread but comments never hurt anyone.) Thanks in advance to anyone who can help me out.
#2
i'm sure there are a few good sources out there (as far as books, videos, etc. go), but i can't think of any. i never used any of them, myself. imo the only way you really learn is by working with people who know what they're doing and learning from them -- then taking what you learn and using your own ear.

i'm sure there are a number of websites where you can download stems to songs, which you can then mix yourself. i'd suggest getting some stems, creating your own mix, and comparing it to the actual song to see (or rather, hear) how things were done differently.
#3
well, first off, get some decent monitors if you don't have them, then I would suggest getting a spectral analyzer and using that as a tool to help you learn to recognize where dominant frequencies for different instruments are. Also spend a lot of time listening to records that you think are mixed really well, and actively listen to whats going on in the mix, try to pick out relative volumes and pinpoint exactly where different elements are in the stereo spectrum in relationship to each other, and listen to how that helps balance the sound.
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#6
-there is a book called "Mixing Audio" by Roey Izhaki, it helped me a lot

- consider getting some of the monthly magazines like "Sound On Sound", "Computer Music" and "Music Tech", i usually end up getting all 3 each month. if you even learn one new thing per issue, then thats £6 well spent.
#7
Quote by Kid_Thorazine
then I would suggest getting a spectral analyzer and using that as a tool to help you learn to recognize where dominant frequencies for different instruments are.


Or you could use these two magic things on each side of your head we engineers like to call ears
#8
Quote by Beefmo
Or you could use these two magic things on each side of your head we engineers like to call ears


well, yeah you do that too, but using visual tools is extremely helpful when starting out.
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#9
Experiment. Remix the same tracks several different ways, go a bit more extreme than you may otherwise, the more things you try the more you will learn about your mixes. Listen to the mixes on various systems including ipods.