#4
Quote by Alex Vik
Well, 2 speakers makes it sound a bit fuller.


Wouldnt it cut your current speaker's sound?

Im not sure, just a shot in the dark.
#5
Using the line out is fine, but make sure that it's not speaker out that you are using.

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[quote="'[BurnTheDusk"]']Boss pedals may be built like tanks but I would rather buy a cardboard box that is on my side than pay for a tank that is working against me.
#6
it'll just f*** up your amp's tone man
i mean no damage but the tone will change...
but make sure you dont have it on higher volumes.. i meant the out put of the first amp... (ie no speaker out's or something..)

plus i'd sugges you get an ABY box and pug your guitar to it... and plug the amps to A and B
in that way you could use both at a time plus could have different settings on each one and toggle through them for Clean/distortion or something
way more versatile i think
#8
If your Vox has an aux in, I would suggest running it to the aux input instead of the instrument input.
#9
I have run my 1967 Bassman head through my friend's Peavey combo and it sounded brilliant and sweet. There was no damage or anything noticeable, but could I be harming to tubes or circuitry of my head without realizing?
#10
Quote by luv090909
Wouldnt it cut your current speaker's sound?

Im not sure, just a shot in the dark.

You'd think so, but it doesn't.

Quote by Dr.Pain-MD
Using the line out is fine, but make sure that it's not speaker out that you are using.

Well, the Speaker Out is hooked up to the internal speaker, so I don't think I'll make that mistake.

Quote by stykerwolf
From the FX loop send to another amps input?

Nah no damage, none of the high voltage exists there.

Nah, from the Line Out, not FX loop.

Quote by fly135
If your Vox has an aux in, I would suggest running it to the aux input instead of the instrument input.

Well, my bass amp has an aux in. I might try hooking it up to that so that I'd have matching speaker sizes at least.

Quote by foob85
I have run my 1967 Bassman head through my friend's Peavey combo and it sounded brilliant and sweet. There was no damage or anything noticeable, but could I be harming to tubes or circuitry of my head without realizing?

If you used the speaker out of the Bassman into the instrument in on the Peavey without a dummy load, yes, you can damage it.
#11
Quote by Alex Vik
If you used the speaker out of the Bassman into the instrument in on the Peavey without a dummy load, yes, you can damage it.

Okay, what is a dummy load?
#12
Quote by foob85
Okay, what is a dummy load?

Well it does not necessarily have to be a dummy load, but a load on an amplifier means that a speaker or speakers (or other device in the case of a dummy load) is/are drawing current from the amp, making sure that the amp doesn't get backed up like a constipated elephant.

A dummy load is where a device simulates an electrical load; basically the same thing except no sound comes out. This is usually used to recording purposes since most tube amps don't have line out ports.
#13
Quote by imicius
Well it does not necessarily have to be a dummy load, but a load on an amplifier means that a speaker or speakers (or other device in the case of a dummy load) is/are drawing current from the amp, making sure that the amp doesn't get backed up like a constipated elephant.

A dummy load is where a device simulates an electrical load; basically the same thing except no sound comes out. This is usually used to recording purposes since most tube amps don't have line out ports.

The Peavey combo was plugged in, if that's what you mean. I'm not exactly sure what you mean though, sorry

For example, what would I do to create a dummy load?
I need to know so I don't blow up my $6000 amp.
#14
Quote by foob85
The Peavey combo was plugged in, if that's what you mean. I'm not exactly sure what you mean though, sorry

For example, what would I do to create a dummy load?
I need to know so I don't blow up my $6000 amp.

Lemmie break it down a little more:

When you plug an instrument into the instrument input on your amplifier, your instrument is sending all of the signal; your amp is not 'asking' for signal, it just accepts it. It then goes through the preamp/poweramp circuitry, and finally to the output transformer.

When your signal, which is now shaped and loud enough to be heard, gets to this point, it has to go somewhere or else you will damage your output transformer. Speakers are a load, as they 'ask' for signal fro the output transformer, and then dissipate it by vibrating.

A dummy load is where an electrical device simulates what a speaker does, that is, it takes the signal from the OT, but instead of making noise, nothing happens or it converts it to line-level for recording purposes.

In other words, if you plug your amp into the speaker of the combo (assuming matching ohmage and power handling), your amp will be fine. If however, you plug your speaker out into an instrument input, your OT will be damaged, as the second amp (in this case, a combo) is not 'asking' for signal, but rather just accepting signal as it comes.

tl;dr:
plugging speakers into speaker out = good
plugging speaker out into instrument input = bad
#15
Ahh, that makes sense now. Thank ye.

EDIT: And sorry for hijacking your thread, Alex Vik
Last edited by foob85 at Nov 30, 2009,