#1
So, we all know what gain is. It's the stuff that gives you that "chugga-chugga" and let's you play teh br00tz, and we all know that.

What I want to know though is what "gain" really is. I wiki'd it, and all it said was system feedback, but I know that there is a better definition than that, seeing as how not all gain sounds the same.

So, would someone like to explain what "gain" really is?
#3
It is a laundry detergent. It makes your whites whiter.

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#4
Quote by ctb
The level/amount of overdrive?


Yes, but if it's the level of overdrive (overdrive being the breakup in signal), then how is that we can just add more overdrive and make it more br00tz? For some reason, it just seems off to me.
#5
Quote by nebiru
It is a laundry detergent. It makes your whites whiter.



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GAS List:
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#7
It boosts the signal from the microphone(s).
I think.
Gear:
Some sort of guitar, of some sort.
Another one
Big amp
Small amp
A pedal
A pedal again
Some kind of box that goes into the computer.. Haven't figured out its function yet.
#8
Quote by lutfish
It boosts the signal from the microphone(s).
I think.


I'm talking about the gain from the amp, not in recording
#9
Quote by SMB13
I'm talking about the gain from the amp, not in recording

Yeh, well I'm not.


I guess...
Gear:
Some sort of guitar, of some sort.
Another one
Big amp
Small amp
A pedal
A pedal again
Some kind of box that goes into the computer.. Haven't figured out its function yet.
#10
gain boost signals as it is used while using camera's it boost the white pixels, and at an sound mix table gain doesn't mean distortion but making the sound SIGNAL larger in ups and downs. (that is what I can think of it, not exactly sure) but I think it is definitely not the same as distortion, I think the word sounded 'cool' to put on a amp.
#12
Quote by SMB13
I'm talking about the gain from the amp, not in recording

Same thing. Amplifier gain is simply a balance between apparent volume and signal strength. Keeping the output volume the same whilst increasing the signal strength will cause it to clip and jaggedify (technical word there) the wave of the music.
#13
It's just the volume on the overdrive channel. The amount of overdrive itself doesn't change, just the amplification volume of the guitar's pickups.
#14
Quote by Wikipedia
In electronics, gain is a measure of the ability of a circuit (often an amplifier) to increase the power or amplitude of a signal. It is usually defined as the mean ratio of the signal output of a system to the signal input of the same system. It may also be defined as the decimal logarithm of the same ratio.

So if you were to compare the input and output of an amplifier circuit, and the output is greater than the input by a factor of ten, that circuit would have more gain than a circuit where the output is only greater by a factor of five.
#15
Gain is the amount of clipping added to the original wave by increasing output. Clipping induces the Overdrive or Distortion sound. Overdrive is smooth clip, Distortion is harsh clip.
...
#16
Quote by Zoot Allures
how much the signal is being distorted due to the amount of signal going through the tubes or the transistors.


Alright, I think that's what I'm looking for!

EDIT: Along with what bartdevil and Blue_Strat said
Last edited by SMB13 at Nov 30, 2009,
#17
I believe the technical term is 'extra noise,' although it may also be referred to as 'more noise.' Some dialects also use the idiosyncratic 'further noise.' The plural is 'lots of extra noise,' except in particularly notable multiples in which case the correct description would be 'shit loads of fucking br00tal ball-crunching metal noise.'

Hope that clears things up.
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#18
Quote by Zoot Allures
how much the signal is being distorted due to the amount of signal going through the tubes or the transistors.

Gain doesn't necessitate distortion: distortion is the result of too much gain (for the component to handle) overloading a valve or transistor and causing the signal to break up.