#1
Alright, well here's a bit of a backstory:

About a year ago I picked up an Ibanez RG340 at a pawn shop (one of the first RG's, it's more like a strat in looks, there's pics on the profile.) Anyways, I loved it, I cleaned it up, got it some new strings, it was amazing, best guitar I've ever played, about 6 months ago I had issues. The jack came loose, mind you at this point I was a complete modding/electronics n00b. I twisted it and without knowing what i was doing broke the wires off the jack, then in my n00bishness I did a shit repair job fixing it, then it got to the point I didn't have enough wire to reach the jack, what did I do? Took the faceplate of the jack off, and taped the jack to the inside of the cavity and did another shit wiring job. Eventually this failed as well, but i found some wire in an old amp, stayed up all night rewiring the whole thing (almost anyways) to get it working again, I got it working and it played, but with terrible hum, then after researched I found out I had wired the jack wrong this time, after switching it it was better, but still not playable. Moar research and I know the pups are dead, they are original from 1989 so it's not exactly a shocker, anyways, my current problem.
SKIP TO HERE IF YOU DON'T WANT THE BACK STORY.

I have absolutely no money for new pick ups, but what I do have, my friends is the old pickguard/pups of a strat I have and re-built. They aren't good, but they play. Now here is my question, is it possible to put two single coils in the whole where the humbucker would go in there, and wire them to act as a humbucker? I don't need the exact sound as it's gonna be temporary, but a humbucker sound is best. If it is possible, what all would I need? I'm still fairly n00by, so I'm not sure.

And, if someone were kind enough, could you make a diagram for me? it would be two singles on the bridge spot, and one in the neck, w/e type of switch I need, and one volume pot.
(If the singles can't go together, it would be one in each position then, and if this should go to the wiring thread, tell me and I'll delete it and repost there.)

Thanks for any help.
#2
firstly pickups do not die and ones from the 80's should be fine, as ones from the 60's are still as good as they were when they were new. i would suggest you entirely rewire the whole guitar, and take it to a tech to do a professional job, they will only charge about $50 to do it.
#3
Quote by britishsligean
firstly pickups do not die and ones from the 80's should be fine, as ones from the 60's are still as good as they were when they were new. i would suggest you entirely rewire the whole guitar, and take it to a tech to do a professional job, they will only charge about $50 to do it.


not dead from age, dead from abuse. When i got the thing it was oily and had spongbob stickers all over it, I don't know what all has been done but they pickups don't put out signal. and even if i'm totally wrong and they do work, when they worked fine they had more hum than I want and not exactly a great tone, so I would still rather use the singles than get the old ones working, meaning my question is still valid.
#4
Check out my squire thread in my sig. I did exactly what you're after.
The key here is to make sure you use either the bridge and middle pups or the neck and middle pups. As you may know, those positions (2 and 4) on a strat are usually hum-cancelling because the middle pickup is RWRP (reverse-wound, reverse-polarity) in relation to the other pups.
Just wire 'em up in series and you're good to go.

Of course the opening on the RG may not be big enough for the single coils. If this happens you can either open it up till they fit, or you can try taking the cover off the singles.

EDIT: If you have a multimeter, you can ask one of the people more knowledgeable about pickups what to test to confirm that the old pups are dead, and if there's anything you can do to repair them, which seems like a more reasonable option to try first (unless you just want to do this FFS).
Member of the official GB&C "Who to Listen to" list
Quote by handbanana
wiliscool is just plain dumb
Last edited by wiliscool at Nov 30, 2009,
#5
Quote by wiliscool
Check out my squire thread in my sig. I did exactly what you're after.
The key here is to make sure you use either the bridge and middle pups or the neck and middle pups. As you may know, those positions (2 and 4) on a strat are usually hum-cancelling because the middle pickup is RWRP (reverse-wound, reverse-polarity) in relation to the other pups.
Just wire 'em up in series and you're good to go.

Of course the opening on the RG may not be big enough for the single coils. If this happens you can either open it up till they fit, or you can try taking the cover off the singles.

EDIT: If you have a multimeter, you can ask one of the people more knowledgeable about pickups what to test to confirm that the old pups are dead, and if there's anything you can do to repair them, which seems like a more reasonable option to try first (unless you just want to do this FFS).


The opening should be fine, it's for H/S/S configuration right now, all of them with covers so I'm not worried about that. Thanks for the advice, and like I said, whether they work or not I don't want to bother repairing to get something I know I don't like, I'd rather use pups I know are better. (Plus it means I get to mess with my guitar, fun!)
#6
Right on.

One more piece of advice, the 2 singles will not sound like a humbucker, although they will be much hotter than a single coil alone and will be hum cancelling.

Good luck.
Member of the official GB&C "Who to Listen to" list
Quote by handbanana
wiliscool is just plain dumb
#7
Quote by wiliscool
Right on.

One more piece of advice, the 2 singles will not sound like a humbucker, although they will be much hotter than a single coil alone and will be hum cancelling.

Good luck.


That's good enough for me, like I said it's temporary

Thanks man, I swear if it weren't for GB&C I wouldn't have a working guitar
#8
To my knowledge pickups don't actually die. It might help to study up on wiring diagrams of various guitars. In particular I've found that I really only need to worry about the "hot" connections which is the actual signal path, standard colors for these are usually red or white (but I've also seen yellow, orange, etc...). All grounding points should connect together at a common point (such as the back of the volume pot) then ultimately to the grounding lug on the jack.

Once you understand the difference between "hot" wires and "ground" wires it becomes relatively easy. Color coding the wires makes it even easier.
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#9
Quote by axe_2_grind
To my knowledge pickups don't actually die. It might help to study up on wiring diagrams of various guitars. In particular I've found that I really only need to worry about the "hot" connections which is the actual signal path, standard colors for these are usually red or white (but I've also seen yellow, orange, etc...). All grounding points should connect together at a common point (such as the back of the volume pot) then ultimately to the grounding lug on the jack.

Once you understand the difference between "hot" wires and "ground" wires it becomes relatively easy. Color coding the wires makes it even easier.


I already explained the dead pups, and the rest i know, for the most part at least

Thanks though
#11
Quote by britishsligean
i'm sure most of your problems were created by when you tried that wiring


Yes unfortunately, but it was all important for me to learn. If I could go back I would solder up that jack right away and be back in business, but I'm glad I learned how to fix it because odds are I'm gonna need to know sometime later.