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One on Sunday
is a zombie?
Join date: Mar 2008
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#1
Hey guys, I'm writing an article for a music publication on how hardcore/metalcore/whatevercore have progressed (or regressed...) in the past decade, and it would be cool to have some extra insight from the forum.

So just give me your opinions of the highs points, the low points, the key moments, the new sounds that emerged, specific bands/albums that really revolutionized the genre (and why), the aesthetic, and the change in your personal feelings on the genre over the last 10 years. Or really anything else that you'd think would be important to cover in the last decade of hardcore. Try to be intelligent in your replies pl0x

Thanks, this'll really help with research for my article.

Feel free to turn this into an open discussion on your thoughts about hardcore in the last decade. Be sure to answer some of my questions in the discussion at least
Last edited by One on Sunday at Nov 30, 2009,
boffen
UG Board King
Join date: Jul 2009
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#3
Every artist which got like five seconds of screaming or a breakdown get labeled hardcore or screamo these days. I listen to loads of the newer core-bands, but I'm still pissed when I see all these bands being tagged as Hardcore and Screamo on last.fm.

When you ask something what they listen to and they are like "metal and hardcore and screamocore and stuff" and you ask them what bands they like and they say "Avenged Sevenfold" I want to punch them in the face.
ItWillDo
Sumeriancore Elitist
Join date: Jul 2007
548 IQ
#4
Alright, although I do hope you understand that every answer here will merely be ones opinion, I'll contribute.


As you know, -core emerged from early hardcore punk. Now personally, I don't like punk, hardcore punk and usually I don't even like hardcore. I used to be a huge thrash/ Göthenburg fan until I discovered the wonderful world of metalcore. It has the melodic riffs of Göthenburg metal, and offers the awesome 'distorted' vocals of death metal.

The thing I like most about metalcore is how it usually also carries technical playing and sometimes even intriguing lyrics. And as I've been listening to metalcore, my desire for more progressive music kept growing until I discovered what I'm looking for. I guess I could call this the "pinacle" of my '-core'-preference. 'Melodic Progressive Deathcore' AKA "Sumeriancore". Though Sumeriancore isn't the actual genre (for now it isn't atleast), it is a brilliant way to say what kind of bands you like. When you think of Sumeriancore, you think of the label it refers to (Sumerian Records that is), and so immediatly think of brilliant bands like Born Of Osiris, Veil of Maya, The Faceless (Which is more of a Death Metal band) , Conducting From The Grave and of course After The Burial. These are all 5 incredibly skilled and talented bands with amazing technical skills and a writing skill even Barry Shwartz would envy.

Sumeriancore isn't limited to bands signed to the label though, this also includes bands like The Red Chord, Within The Ruins and The Boy Will Drown which are all signed to a different label. Also a little thing to add here, I believe The Red Chord is known to have "popularized" the deathcore-genre. So I guess you could surely mention them. (Not to forget that their latest album is one ****ing brilliant piece of art)


That's about it I guess, if you still have any questions or anything, feel free to ask.

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handbanana
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#6
No Warning and Blacklisted
Quote by alm0st a skat3r
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IcePh0enix
Banned
Join date: Sep 2007
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#7
read up on/write about:
-Deathwish records
-Converge, Have Heart, Blacklisted
-big bands breaking up and forming
-hardcore bands breaking into the mainstream, as well as diy outlets
-the pop-punkcore explosion
-Bridge 9 and the new youth crew/straight edge bands
-New York style hardcore
-the emergence of metalcore and deathcore
-Boston, Philly, Baltimore, New York, Los Angelos, anywhere else with a decent scene

That should cover a lot, hope this post helps.
handbanana
Registered Duder
Join date: Jul 2008
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#8
^new york style hardcore broke out in the 90s, along with a few of the other things you mentioned
Quote by alm0st a skat3r
yeah i remember when i had a good conscience. now i dont give a ****

xxx
smoke weed, drink 40's, **** titties
IcePh0enix
Banned
Join date: Sep 2007
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#9
Yeah I'm not really talking about the creation of it, more about current bands that utilize these styles and their influence on the modern hardcore scene.
tancanada
crapcore
Join date: Feb 2008
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#10
You should write a whole paragraph on attack attack and the crabcore movement, just for the lulz

and @ItWillDo, be careful about Sumerian, they have bands like Asking Alexandria on there
love is love // return to dust
Last edited by tancanada at Nov 30, 2009,
One on Sunday
is a zombie?
Join date: Mar 2008
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#11
I definitely will write about the "crabcore" movement (well not exactly on crabcore, but mostly about scene-core). Its probably gonna be the largest section, as its one of the most prevalent and controversial parts of hardcore of the decade.
tancanada
crapcore
Join date: Feb 2008
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#12
Quote by One on Sunday
I definitely will write about the "crabcore" movement (well not exactly on crabcore, but mostly about scene-core). Its probably gonna be the largest section, as its one of the most prevalent and controversial parts of hardcore of the decade.


Whenever you get done with your first draft you should post it here, Id like to read it
love is love // return to dust
nashawa
Rightful HxC Emperor
Join date: Feb 2008
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#13
Talk about the misconception with the mainstream media that core kids like bands ONLY because they're underground. I get this comment all the time, and it's totally untrue, as most of you will probably agree. it doesn't matter how popular the band is as long as they make good music. Converge are breaking into mainstream metal (because they don't know what to call it), as is Coalesce to a lesser degree...
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zezimathehero
pretentious wankstick
Join date: Oct 2008
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#14
talk about Jane Doe. And i guess the pop punk-hardcore crossover, the explosion of christian metalcore bands, hot topic bands, and the explosion of deathcore bands. And Jane Doe. Pretty much everything everyone else has said.
Quote by seeneyj
I thought the whole idea of post-hardcore was to mix techno and hardcore.....
MustangMan311
Cody
Join date: May 2006
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#15
Quote by ItWillDo

Sumeriancore isn't limited to bands signed to the label though, this also includes bands like The Red Chord

Don't want to hijack the thread, but seriously? The Red Chord pre-dates Sumerian and any of the bands on the label itself by at least a couple of years. I like Sumerian bands, but don't belittle the Red Chord by calling them that, especially when they have nothing in common with any of the bands that should be labeled "Sumeriancore" in the first place.
One on Sunday
is a zombie?
Join date: Mar 2008
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#16
Ok, good responses so far!

Question: Whats one of the first bands to popularize the use of electronics in metalcore? Underoath-esque, but i need another example of an early 2000s band who was a pioneer of it.
zezimathehero
pretentious wankstick
Join date: Oct 2008
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#17
HORSE the band maybe?
Quote by seeneyj
I thought the whole idea of post-hardcore was to mix techno and hardcore.....
MustangMan311
Cody
Join date: May 2006
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#18
Quote by One on Sunday
Ok, good responses so far!

Question: Whats one of the first bands to popularize the use of electronics in metalcore? Underoath-esque, but i need another example of an early 2000s band who was a pioneer of it.

I personally don't think the influence of electronics came out of the hardcore scene, but other scenes leaking into it. Especially as of lately- All the autotune use and synths are straight out of the new "R&B" stuff.
JxD
Registered User
Join date: May 2008
957 IQ
#19
Quote by One on Sunday
Ok, good responses so far!

Question: Whats one of the first bands to popularize the use of electronics in metalcore? Underoath-esque, but i need another example of an early 2000s band who was a pioneer of it.

The idea of mixing synth and hardcore isn't an idea unique to the most recent decade. Hardcore bands were doing it in the mid-90's (ex. The Locust) and they took their cues from experimental rock bands so I would say it was something that gradually began to blend into hardcore.

I think you have a lot of research to do. I would recommend learning the origins of metalcore, seeing as how you're largely dealing with a catch-phrase that has been hijacked of late, the book Burning Fight is a pretty good place to start. If you don't want to do that I suppose reading about bands like Integrity, Shai Hulud, Converge, and Unbroken will suffice. You might want to check out some information on labels like Bridge Nine and Deathwish, being that they're extremely important right now, and labels like Revelation and Ebullition, who have been important steadily for the passed 20-odd years.

If you want to talk about the revolution of the genre, you probably won't find many groundbreaking ideas after the turn of the millennium. The important movements in hardcore happened in the 80's and 90's. That's not to say quality has decreased or that bands lack originality, I'm merely saying that the scene has not had a significant and original revitalization for a number of years.
handbanana
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Join date: Jul 2008
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#21
someone else made a similar thread on another forum. good topic.

i still say the best bands to come out of the 00's were No Warning, Blacklisted, and probably American Nightmare. And everything converge has put out since 2000 has been pretty stellar.
Quote by alm0st a skat3r
yeah i remember when i had a good conscience. now i dont give a ****

xxx
smoke weed, drink 40's, **** titties
Valderama
CxC
Join date: Nov 2004
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#22
I'm doing something similar for my SSI.
Im writing about how Hardcore has developed since 1990, in terms of sub-genres, fashion, live performance, social categories etc.
Some pretty useful stuff in here already (Y)
pmeg568c
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Join date: May 2003
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#24
Quote by Valderama
I'm doing something similar for my SSI.
Im writing about how Hardcore has developed since 1990, in terms of sub-genres, fashion, live performance, social categories etc.
Some pretty useful stuff in here already (Y)


yea except the stuff you write about isnt hardcore. hardcore has nothing to do with fashion or social categories
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Magero
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#25
Fashion can refer to just general styles of dress, not a specific scene.
The fashion in the metal scene is normally black shirts, camo pants and long hair, doesn't mean it's a prerequisite or "what the genre is about".
PhobiXa
ur moshing
Join date: Dec 2006
216 IQ
#26
If you need a band with electronics talk about Rolo Tomassi. also there are loads of bands that use them and sound poppy such as House vs Hurricane, and probably a bunch of local bands.

Talk about the lack of political talk and serious content in lyrics of mainstream hardcore/metalcore/moshcore/etc. The watering down of hardcore in recent years.
Probably include that emo phase from a few years back when "emo" was all over TV and malls were full of kids in black and guys with eyeliner.

The emergence of the mosh and deathcore and synthcore bands, and from there the commercialization of hardcore.

The effect the internet has had on the hardcore scene. Its effect on DIY ethics, fashion, audience, accessibility.

Could probably talk about crust punk and how it is becoming more like black metal and vice versa. This would tie in to the idea of metal and hardcore becoming closer as time progresses.
handbanana
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#27
Quote by Valderama
I'm doing something similar for my SSI.
Im writing about how Hardcore has developed since 1990, in terms of sub-genres, fashion, live performance, social categories etc.
Some pretty useful stuff in here already (Y)



just remember that attack attack and as i lay dying aren't 90's hardcore bands
Quote by alm0st a skat3r
yeah i remember when i had a good conscience. now i dont give a ****

xxx
smoke weed, drink 40's, **** titties
nashawa
Rightful HxC Emperor
Join date: Feb 2008
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#28
Quote by handbanana
just remember that attack attack and as i lay dying aren't 90's hardcore bands

Schnap!
Quote by emoboy027
Is fingering an emo chick that likes yoy and that has fallen in love with you is it wrong to you to finger her during lunch outside in front of everyone at the high school? would you not care or lol even wish it was you?

Youztoobz
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Valderama
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#30
Quote by pmeg568c
yea except the stuff you write about isnt hardcore. hardcore has nothing to do with fashion or social categories



Quote by Magero
Fashion can refer to just general styles of dress, not a specific scene.
The fashion in the metal scene is normally black shirts, camo pants and long hair, doesn't mean it's a prerequisite or "what the genre is about".

I mean it in the sense of anything remotely related, i.e. What was in fashion at a certain period of time and how that related to the goings-on in the Hardcore Scene at the time. Its supposed to be a detailed dissertation of sorts, so almost anything is relevant, its actually kinda fun to do aswell.

Quote by handbanana
just remember that attack attack and as i lay dying aren't 90's hardcore bands

srsly? Oh no! I just assumed they were all broke and in their 30s.
PLEASE DETECT THE SARCASM, I BEG OF YOU.

Like I said, its a dissertation on development, so i will be using the 90s scene as a basis if you will.

No need to be an arse.
+}-136-{+
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#32
Quote by JxD
The idea of mixing synth and hardcore isn't an idea unique to the most recent decade. Hardcore bands were doing it in the mid-90's (ex. The Locust) and they took their cues from experimental rock bands so I would say it was something that gradually began to blend into hardcore.

I think you have a lot of research to do. I would recommend learning the origins of metalcore, seeing as how you're largely dealing with a catch-phrase that has been hijacked of late, the book Burning Fight is a pretty good place to start. If you don't want to do that I suppose reading about bands like Integrity, Shai Hulud, Converge, and Unbroken will suffice. You might want to check out some information on labels like Bridge Nine and Deathwish, being that they're extremely important right now, and labels like Revelation and Ebullition, who have been important steadily for the passed 20-odd years.

If you want to talk about the revolution of the genre, you probably won't find many groundbreaking ideas after the turn of the millennium. The important movements in hardcore happened in the 80's and 90's. That's not to say quality has decreased or that bands lack originality, I'm merely saying that the scene has not had a significant and original revitalization for a number of years.


Listen to this man. He knows his shit.

That is all.

Oh yeah, and guys, let's not turn an otherwise decent thread into a shit-flinging fest. Please.
nashawa
Rightful HxC Emperor
Join date: Feb 2008
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#33
Quote by +}-136-{+

Oh yeah, and guys, let's not turn an otherwise decent thread into a shit-flinging fest. Please.

We try our best to keep that concentrated to the crabcore threads, or, I do at least.
Quote by emoboy027
Is fingering an emo chick that likes yoy and that has fallen in love with you is it wrong to you to finger her during lunch outside in front of everyone at the high school? would you not care or lol even wish it was you?

Youztoobz
MIDI Magicalness!
Haymaker17
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2005
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#34
Quote by JxD
The idea of mixing synth and hardcore isn't an idea unique to the most recent decade. Hardcore bands were doing it in the mid-90's (ex. The Locust) and they took their cues from experimental rock bands so I would say it was something that gradually began to blend into hardcore.

I think you have a lot of research to do. I would recommend learning the origins of metalcore, seeing as how you're largely dealing with a catch-phrase that has been hijacked of late, the book Burning Fight is a pretty good place to start. If you don't want to do that I suppose reading about bands like Integrity, Shai Hulud, Converge, and Unbroken will suffice. You might want to check out some information on labels like Bridge Nine and Deathwish, being that they're extremely important right now, and labels like Revelation and Ebullition, who have been important steadily for the passed 20-odd years.

If you want to talk about the revolution of the genre, you probably won't find many groundbreaking ideas after the turn of the millennium. The important movements in hardcore happened in the 80's and 90's. That's not to say quality has decreased or that bands lack originality, I'm merely saying that the scene has not had a significant and original revitalization for a number of years.



you are the man
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ChemicalFire
King of Bacon Pancakes
Join date: Oct 2007
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#35
If I were being pedantic, wouldn't Suicidal Tenancies be the only 'true' metal core band... as it was a mix of Thrash metal and New York Hardcore?
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handbanana
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#37
Quote by ChemicalFire
If I were being pedantic, wouldn't Suicidal Tenancies be the only 'true' metal core band... as it was a mix of Thrash metal and New York Hardcore?



wtf are you talking about?
Quote by alm0st a skat3r
yeah i remember when i had a good conscience. now i dont give a ****

xxx
smoke weed, drink 40's, **** titties
Valderama
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#39
Quote by ChemicalFire
If I were being pedantic, wouldn't Suicidal Tenancies be the only 'true' metal core band... as it was a mix of Thrash metal and New York Hardcore?

eh?
The actual definition of metalcore is merely the literal meaning - metal + hardcore.
Whereas nowadays, that literal meaning is pretty useless, mainstream attention and whatnot have pretty much morphed it into something else. To put it very briefly, not as heavy as Deathcore, but not as "happy" (for lack of a better word) as pop punk / some types of Post-Hardcore.
As you can see, i'm showing no opinion here.

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Settle down son.
I have a genuine interest in this thread, useful stuff for me.
Last edited by Valderama at Dec 3, 2009,
lookpizza
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Join date: Mar 2009
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#40
Quote by ChemicalFire
If I were being pedantic, wouldn't Suicidal Tenancies be the only 'true' metal core band... as it was a mix of Thrash metal and New York Hardcore?


That wouldn't be being pedantic, that would be being wrong.
I'm an asshole.