#1
k, so right now my voice is kinda like in the middle. i think its called a tenor? idk.
well i want to try and sing deeper like josh homme.
when i do it quietly it sounds okay. but when i sing and play guitar and get into it, it sounds terrible.
how do i fix that?
and i'm in an originals band. so would it be super weird if on some songs i sounded deep and some other ones i sounded kind of light, like brandon boyd?
are there any singers out there that change their voice alot? like on the same album?

thanks
#3
You're kind of stuck with the voice you're born with. Learn to love it. You'll find much greater success being yourself than trying to sound like somebody else.
#5
Well Myles Kennedy has an incredible range. Try listening to some Mayfield Four or Alter Bridge to get an idea (I base a lot of my voice off him now). You probably don't want to be limited to only being deep like Scott Stapp though I imagine. Switching it up is good.
Originally Posted by happytimeharry
Your avatar is creepy, yet incredibly hypnotic...

I do what I can

Originally Posted by FiNNi
@AlterEdge: On a side note, I laughed when I noticed pedobear was your avatar

Me too... me too...
#6
Quote by Nameless742
Hit Puberty.
Sorry.

okay lol
does anyone have on tips on this?
#7
Good question. I only know how to make it brighter and thinner.

Edit: Actually, lowering the larynx could help, if you haven't tried that already.
Quote by Oh_God_Its_Back
My girlfriend does that to me!
Feels pretty good!

^In a thread about strap-ons.
#8
Quote by herrotim

are there any singers out there that change their voice alot? like on the same album?


axl rose
RIP George Carlin (1937-2008)
#9
Quote by Tyebuut
You're kind of stuck with the voice you're born with. Learn to love it. You'll find much greater success being yourself than trying to sound like somebody else.


This.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
Quote by herrotim
okay lol
does anyone have on tips on this?


buy someone's pubes
It's always the last day of summer and I've been left out in the cold with no door to get back in
#11
Ever heard Axl Rose's speaking voice? Vastly different from his singing voice.

Scott Weiland has a completely different sound on virtually every record he's featured on. Chris Cornell does a lot of vocal chameleoning, too. Compare "Tears to Forget" to "Blow Up the Outside World" to "Cold Bitch" to "Preaching the End of the World." Layne Staley had a few different sounds to his voice he'd utilize too. Or even Ian Gillian of Deep Purple. He'd go from a solid midrange to a high screech mid-song sometimes. There's no rule that you have to stick to one vocal sound.

As for making your voice sound deeper, the best you can do is get a thick sound via great resonance. But even this is limiting. Your vocal cords are only so long and thick. You can't make them longer and thicker, like you can adduct them to get a higher and lighter tone. That's the only thing that sucks if you're a tenor. Baritones can always learn to sing in a tenor range, even with fairly convincing tenor tonality, but tenors can't really get a deeper sound, or tones as low as a baritone or bass.
#12
Quote by Chaingarden
Ever heard Axl Rose's speaking voice? Vastly different from his singing voice.

Scott Weiland has a completely different sound on virtually every record he's featured on. Chris Cornell does a lot of vocal chameleoning, too. Compare "Tears to Forget" to "Blow Up the Outside World" to "Cold Bitch" to "Preaching the End of the World." Layne Staley had a few different sounds to his voice he'd utilize too. Or even Ian Gillian of Deep Purple. He'd go from a solid midrange to a high screech mid-song sometimes. There's no rule that you have to stick to one vocal sound.

As for making your voice sound deeper, the best you can do is get a thick sound via great resonance. But even this is limiting. Your vocal cords are only so long and thick. You can't make them longer and thicker, like you can adduct them to get a higher and lighter tone. That's the only thing that sucks if you're a tenor. Baritones can always learn to sing in a tenor range, even with fairly convincing tenor tonality, but tenors can't really get a deeper sound, or tones as low as a baritone or bass.




Great post, one of the most useful I've ever seen in this forum.
Quote by Oh_God_Its_Back
My girlfriend does that to me!
Feels pretty good!

^In a thread about strap-ons.
#14
hmm kind of funny I have the opposite problem. I'm a LOW bass I'm comfortable singing C2 sometimes down to B and Bb1. I wish I had a higher voice, but that's why we have falsettos =)
I smile because I have no idea whats goin on
#15
Quote by fenderuser93
hmm kind of funny I have the opposite problem. I'm a LOW bass I'm comfortable singing C2 sometimes down to B and Bb1. I wish I had a higher voice, but that's why we have falsettos =)


*cough* *cough* It's also why SLS was founded *cough* *cough*

Ahem, I'm sorry opera singers. Please excuse my sore throat.


Quote by Oh_God_Its_Back
My girlfriend does that to me!
Feels pretty good!

^In a thread about strap-ons.
#16
Quote by Jimbosandwich
*cough* *cough* It's also why SLS was founded *cough* *cough*

Ahem, I'm sorry opera singers. Please excuse my sore throat.




SLS?
I smile because I have no idea whats goin on
#17
Quote by fenderuser93
SLS?


Speech Level Singing

It's a modern approach to the voice, and isn't based off opera technique too heavily (for once). The whole point of it was to sing without any tension on high notes, but along the way they found a technique to allow anybody to sing any high note they want (assuming they have the ability to practice on a regular basis). The method involves "zipping up" the vocal cords to shorten the vibrating distance, which directly raises the pitch. Once they had singers able to get huge ranges (5+ octaves, including vocal fry and whistle) without strain, the method started splitting up into subcategories. The Manning Method (Singing Success, Mastering Mix) focuses on building a huge range, then allowing you to sing with whatever tone you want (bright, deep, rich). Once you build your range, it starts to focus on creating "the mixed voice", or as Brett calls it, "the mix". This is a super commercial tone that once you master, you are guaranteed a career as a singer. This is the technique I've been studying since June, and have already had great success with it. The Isolation Method (Jaime Vendera, Jim Gillette) focuses on expanding range by using falsetto to reach your super-high head notes.

This is the insanely-over-the-top-extremely-dumbed-down version of it, of course, but you get the idea.
Quote by Oh_God_Its_Back
My girlfriend does that to me!
Feels pretty good!

^In a thread about strap-ons.
#18
Quote by Jimbosandwich
*cough* *cough* It's also why SLS was founded *cough* *cough*

Ahem, I'm sorry opera singers. Please excuse my sore throat.




I know this was a shot at me, but sadly, I'm not quite sure what you're getting at.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#19
Quote by axemanchris
I know this was a shot at me, but sadly, I'm not quite sure what you're getting at.

CT


Not at you, just the typical "The range you have is the range you were born with" phrase that I hear so much from opera singers.
Quote by Oh_God_Its_Back
My girlfriend does that to me!
Feels pretty good!

^In a thread about strap-ons.
#20
Quote by Jimbosandwich
Not at you, just the typical "The range you have is the range you were born with" phrase that I hear so much from opera singers.

please enlighten me. I doubt 'll ever hit tenor notes in chest voice, but it'd be great if you could prove me wrong
I smile because I have no idea whats goin on
#21
okay well i think i found a way to make my voice a little deeper...
is there any rule like on how loud you have to sing?
and i see ur point on axl rose's talking voice...thanks
#22
Quote by fenderuser93
please enlighten me. I doubt 'll ever hit tenor notes in chest voice, but it'd be great if you could prove me wrong


Tenors can't even hit "tenor high notes" in chest voice Most of them use mixed voice (all-around resonance with a head voice coordination) or head voice.

Since this technique goes deeper then "Sing these vowel sounds on a five tone scale", it's pretty hard to explain. I have some posts scattered around here (mostly in the range thread), but your best bet is to use these resources to find out if it's a technique you want to study.

http://www.singingsuccessonline.com/forum/ (Singing Success Online forums) -The vocal technique forum has a lot of information, while general discussion seems to have a lot of posts on individual products. You can find me here with the same username. Tuesdaywonderland is your man if you want more info on how the Manning Method works.

http://www.singingsuccess.com/ (SS product site) -Has some good info on how the method works.

http://www.speechlevelsinging.com/slsmethod.html (Official SLS method page) -This is the official page for the entire technique, created by Seth Riggs. Brett Manning isn't actually a certified SLS coach, but his method is based around the same concepts. Seth Riggs is the dude that came up with the method, and taught everybody.

http://www.raiseyourvoicebook.com/ryvbpromo.html (Raise Your Voice info page) -It's exactly that. Jaime's technique uses "The Isolation Method" to expand range, improve tone, and add any qualities to your voice you feel you may be lacking. I'm not sure if Jaime is actually SLS, but it has the same end result nonetheless. Oh, and he can also do a PERFECT ACDC impression (but with good technique).

http://www.sethriggs.com/themethod.html (Seth Riggs official method page) -You get the point.

http://www.lucyprod.com/JudithLynneStudio/SLSmethod.htm (Random page I found through Google) -To be honest, I wish I would have just copy-pasted this page. It's short and simple, but it's pretty informative. After the other pages, this will feel like the easiest read of your life.

And to help give you guys some confidence, here's:
A man hitting an A9-http://www.nicolasedda.com/download/Nicola%20Sedda%20-%20Vocal%20Range%20Game%20(E1-A9)%2007-07-2005.mp3

And a baritone hitting a G5-http://www.box.net/shared/tjmrvexh11

Neither of those examples used falsetto. The first used a legit head voice and whistle register (which men DO have!!!), and the second used a mixed voice.

Good Luck!
Quote by Oh_God_Its_Back
My girlfriend does that to me!
Feels pretty good!

^In a thread about strap-ons.
#23
I hate to double post, but that first one was huge

Quote by herrotim
okay well i think i found a way to make my voice a little deeper...
is there any rule like on how loud you have to sing?
and i see ur point on axl rose's talking voice...thanks


Nope. As long as you are "supporting your voice" and feel no strain, you can sing as loud as you want. Or as soft. As long as people can hear you, you're okay.

Good Luck!
Quote by Oh_God_Its_Back
My girlfriend does that to me!
Feels pretty good!

^In a thread about strap-ons.
#24
Quote by Jimbosandwich
Tenors can't even hit "tenor high notes" in chest voice Most of them use mixed voice (all-around resonance with a head voice coordination) or head voice.


Think of it this way:
-chest voice = the woofer
-head voice = the tweeter

Both sound like @ss on their own (though singing entirely in head voice or chest voice is impossible, but the analogy illustrates the point). As a result, you always sing with mixed voice. Lower notes will use more chest resonance, and higher notes will have more sinus cavity resonance, but it will always be a mix.

Given that, then no, tenors do not hit tenor C in chest voice. Of COURSE they hit it in mixed voice.

Quote by Jimbosandwich

And to help give you guys some confidence, here's:
A man hitting an A9-http://www.nicolasedda.com/download/Nicola%20Sedda%20-%20Vocal%20Range%20Game%20(E1-A9)%2007-07-2005.mp3

And a baritone hitting a G5-http://www.box.net/shared/tjmrvexh11

Neither of those examples used falsetto. The first used a legit head voice and whistle register (which men DO have!!!), and the second used a mixed voice.
Good Luck!


WTF? The first was a good example of whistle register, which is even more artificial than falsetto. It's impressive, but it's still a p!ssing contest.

The second was purely falsetto. Purely. A good falsetto, yes, but still falsetto.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#26
Quote by axemanchris
falsetto


Wait, what!? I say "it's not falsetto" and link to data that shows it isn't, and you can say "it is" and be right? No.

I dare you to go say "it's falsetto" to the guys on the SSO forums. They're the kind of people that are willing to shove cameras down their throats just to prove people like you wrong. On "High C without Straining" there is video evidence of the vocal cords adducting to reach high pitches. I would send you the freaking DVD if it would make you acknowledge modern technique's existence!!!
Quote by Oh_God_Its_Back
My girlfriend does that to me!
Feels pretty good!

^In a thread about strap-ons.
#27
Quote by Jimbosandwich
Wait, what!? I say "it's not falsetto" and link to data that shows it isn't, and you can say "it is" and be right? No.


Wha? Where is this data that you linked to that 'verifies' that it isn't? So, at the moment, you're suggesting something is not falsetto. I listen to it, disagree, and make an assertion that it is falsetto. No problem there, aside from us disagreeing, no?

Quote by Jimbosandwich

I dare you to go say "it's falsetto" to the guys on the SSO forums. They're the kind of people that are willing to shove cameras down their throats just to prove people like you wrong. On "High C without Straining" there is video evidence of the vocal cords adducting to reach high pitches. I would send you the freaking DVD if it would make you acknowledge modern technique's existence!!!


Me going over there would do nothing more than start a flame war. Sure, I can defend myself, but seriously.... I have better things to do.

I know what falsetto sounds like. As far as I'm concerned, if it sounds falsetto, then for all practical purposes, it IS falsetto. So, they can shove video cameras down their throats all they want, but in the end, the difference is in the ear more than it is in what might 'actually' be happening with the vocal cords.

Ultimately, the listener doesn't give half a rat's @ss about what the vocal cords are doing. They care about the tone. The tone there is falsetto.

I don't dispute the existence of the technique. What I do dispute is the misinformation about what falsetto is, how range is defined, and the notion that head voice and chest voice are separate and exclusive entities.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#28
Quote by axemanchris
Wha? Where is this data that you linked to that 'verifies' that it isn't? So, at the moment, you're suggesting something is not falsetto. I listen to it, disagree, and make an assertion that it is falsetto. No problem there, aside from us disagreeing, no?


Me going over there would do nothing more than start a flame war. Sure, I can defend myself, but seriously.... I have better things to do.

I know what falsetto sounds like. As far as I'm concerned, if it sounds falsetto, then for all practical purposes, it IS falsetto. So, they can shove video cameras down their throats all they want, but in the end, the difference is in the ear more than it is in what might 'actually' be happening with the vocal cords.

Ultimately, the listener doesn't give half a rat's @ss about what the vocal cords are doing. They care about the tone. The tone there is falsetto.

I don't dispute the existence of the technique. What I do dispute is the misinformation about what falsetto is, how range is defined, and the notion that head voice and chest voice are separate and exclusive entities.

CT


I doubt that.

The TONE of high notes might sound falsetto-ish, minus the breathy sound, but true falsetto lacks depth and power. Even a trained falsettist won't be able to cut through distorted guitars and a drumset (not without damaging his voice, at least). Falsetto also limits what tones you can sing with. When I sing in a higher mix, I can sound like whatever I want, but in falsetto...not a chance.

And since you think that example used falsetto, does that mean you think all the high pitched 70's-80's rock singers used it on THEIR high notes? The example sounds exactly like all of them do, but they never used falsetto.

And listeners could easily tell the difference between full voice and falsetto. They can tell when somebody confidently hits a strong, high note, as compared to a wimpy, breathy note that sounded like a boy imitating a little girl.
Quote by Oh_God_Its_Back
My girlfriend does that to me!
Feels pretty good!

^In a thread about strap-ons.
#29
Quote by Jimbosandwich
I doubt that.




Quote by Jimbosandwich


And since you think that example used falsetto, does that mean you think all the high pitched 70's-80's rock singers used it on THEIR high notes? The example sounds exactly like all of them do, but they never used falsetto.


Some did, some didn't. Best example of the clear difference: Listen to Run to the Hills by Maiden. On the choruses, "run for your li-i-ife", Dickenson goes up to the tenor C, and even for just a smidge, hits a rather convincing D above that. No falsetto there. Just kick ass range. When he goes up to the G at the *very* end of the song.... that's falsetto. Not a wimpy, airy falsetto, no. Good, well-supported falsetto.

Quote by Jimbosandwich

And listeners could easily tell the difference between full voice and falsetto. They can tell when somebody confidently hits a strong, high note, as compared to a wimpy, breathy note that sounded like a boy imitating a little girl.


But apparently, there are a number of people here who cannot tell the difference between a good strong supported falsetto and actual "natural" voice.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#30
Honestly guys, why does it make a difference? A good singer is a good singer, period. I'm not sure why some people are so damn hell bent on method. If someone wants to be misinformed about something, allow them to be. If someone sounds good, I don't care what technique, definition, or semantics they use. Likewise, someone could have the most proper, efficient, widely accepted technique on the planet, but if they sound lame, they sound lame, and I don't want to listen to them, it's as simple as that.
#31
Quote by Tyebuut
You're kind of stuck with the voice you're born with. Learn to love it. You'll find much greater success being yourself than trying to sound like somebody else.


This is partly true. With practice, you can definitely expand your range. I'm not talking by octaves or anything, but it can make a difference.

And I'm staying out of the falsetto argument this time, simply because neither side is ever going to concede. However, many 70s/80s singers did use falsetto.

Look up Matt Barlow, from Iced Earth. Does his falsetto sound "wimpy" to you?
My guitar modification blog.
Quote by MuffinMan
Jesus was all like "To those about to rock, I salute you." then he grabbed his mighty axe and rocked the Romans out really hard. Of course they were strict classical music so....
Last edited by Black Star at Dec 5, 2009,
#32
Quote by Black Star
This is partly true. With practice, you can definitely expand your range. I'm not talking by octaves or anything, but it can make a difference.

Agreed.
#33
You can most certainly expand your range. How much depends mostly on how poor your technique was in the first place. Since technique helps you to sing more efficiently and to make the best of your voice, if you start with poor technique, your range will most certainly be stunted by it. Remove the barriers, and you will grow.

But, you can't expect to add, like, an octave or anything to your voice in most cases. Not even my technique was that bad. I added a major third (from F# to A#, roughly) to my voice. Though that doesn't sound like much, my range of songs I could sing when I could barely squawk out the G on the first strings was considerably limited. Now that I can hit even the A above that, (and depending on the song or the day, even the B) with no difficulty, there is LOTS more that I can do.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#34
Quote by Chaingarden
Honestly guys, why does it make a difference? A good singer is a good singer, period. ...If someone wants to be misinformed about something, allow them to be. If someone sounds good, I don't care what technique, definition, or semantics they use. Likewise, someone could have the most proper, efficient, widely accepted technique on the planet, but if they sound lame, they sound lame, and I don't want to listen to them, it's as simple as that.


Agreed.

Quote by Chaingarden

I'm not sure why some people are so damn hell bent on method....definition, or semantics they use.


Believe it or not I DO try to avoid saying that the Bel Canto technique is the only way to sing properly or well. However, I try to clarify information that I perceive to be misleading or false in general terms. (you know.... like what falsetto is and stuff....) When someone makes an assertion that they have a four octave range, for instance, that is - at the very best - misleading. People need to understand how range is defined, and then they can better judge whether that person truly does have the range they claim to have, or if they are using a loose definition of range that suits them, albeit one that might not be correct. When you buy your "Learn to Sing DVD collection" and it makes an assertion that you will add two octaves to your voice, unless you're informed, you'll actually believe them.

As far as definitions and semantics go, humans have a desire to describe things, which helps them to understand things and to explain them to others - the very thing we try to do on this forum. To be successful, we need to sometimes clarify defnitions, or at least come to an understanding of what a person means when they are using a certain words.

Falsetto has a sound to it - particularly with male voices. People should know what it is. It's not really one of those things that can be considered arbitrary or open to interpretation.

On the other hand, I'm not going to go off and tell someone that if they're not inhaling their voice, they're doing it wrong, even if I actually believe that to be the case myself. If it works for them.... great.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#35
Quote by Black Star
This is partly true. With practice, you can definitely expand your range. I'm not talking by octaves or anything, but it can make a difference.


Well, if you were as shit as me when you started out you probably can increase your range by octaves, I couldn't even hit a G below middle C when I started out (and I'm a tenor)
#36
Listen to Mike Patton from Faith No More.

Or even better, listen to Christian Alvestam from Scar Symmetry.
Listen closely to his Growling voice also - he can totally alter the pitch and the tone, to range from high-pitched screaming, to low, deep gutteral roars. It may not be your thing, but by listening to it you can appreciate the talent, and the effort he has put into honing his vocal skills.

This two singers will give you an example of Multivocal styles. You are not necessarily born with your voice. If you can fake accents and dialects in normal speech, you can recreate different vocal styles too - thats a fact. I have a strong Irish accent, however when I'm singing, you wouldnt know I'm a paddy.
DARK_MATTER, Instrumental Post-Metal from Ireland


Bass:
Ibanez BTB 405QM
Ashdown PM600 - Peavey TVX 4x10
Russian Big Muff

Guitar:
Fender Jim Root sig
'99 Stagemaster 7-string
Yamaha F310
Hughes & Kettner Warp 7 w/4x12
#37
@cheeseman - given that very few people have much more than two octaves, even once the voice is fully developed, then if one were to extend their range by, say, two octaves, it would suggest that they could only sing maybe an interval of a major third to start with. I'm not sure if I've heard *anyone* with *that* limited a range.

@roast - while what you say is true to an extent, I'm not sure anyone would confuse the voices of Bruce Dickenson and Frank Sinatra, no matter how hard they tried to sound like the other, or obfuscate their voices with dialectic accents, or whatever else. Their tone is their tone.

The example I keep using is the idea that you can never make a Strat sound like a Les Paul, or vice-versa. Sure, you can plug your Les Paul into a 10W practice amp and it will sound a *lot* different than it would if you plugged it into a hand-wired Marshall, but it will still sound like a Les Paul, and it will still never sound like a Strat.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#38
Quote by Jimbosandwich
*cough* *cough* It's also why SLS was founded *cough* *cough*

Ahem, I'm sorry opera singers. Please excuse my sore throat.




Haha! Word!.. To sing deeper notes, make some exercerices for it and try to sound bassy. Try to sound really "manly".. kind of like sports maniac singing.

"Ba-om ba-om ba-om" was a useful exercise an old teacher of mine showed me.

You decend one fifth on the first ba. and sing the rest of the words on the lower note like this (on a guitar):

A|-7--------------------
E|---5---5-5---5-5----

You should do it within a comforable range, and start a bit above your lowest notes, and then gradally go deeper. The high note keeps you from tensing up in the deep range.

Work with your breath control too. There's a description of it at http://learn-how-to-sing.com/vocal-breathing-exercises.html
Last edited by glee at Dec 19, 2009,
#39
Quote by axemanchris
@cheeseman - given that very few people have much more than two octaves, even once the voice is fully developed, then if one were to extend their range by, say, two octaves, it would suggest that they could only sing maybe an interval of a major third to start with. I'm not sure if I've heard *anyone* with *that* limited a range.


Well it's a technicality, but I gained 1.5 octaves from what I had when I started, I'd still call that "octaves".
But yeah for the most part since most people who've never sang before can at least hit a middle C you generally wouldn't gain nearly that much.