#1
In the "The Complete Idiot's Guide to Music Theory", Chapter 2, page 21 they say:

Major and Minor Intervals
When you describe intervals by degree, you still have to deal with those pitches
that fall above or below the basic notes—the sharps and flats, or the black keys
on a keyboard.
When measuring by degrees, you see that the second, third, sixth, and seventh
notes can be easily flattened.
When you flatten one of these notes, you create
what is called a minor interval. The natural state of these intervals (in a major
scale) is called a major interval.

They show a C scale as an example where they flatten the 2nd, 3rd, 6th, and 7th.

I don't understand the sentence in bold. Where do they come up with second, third, sixth, and seventh notes as being easily flattened? In the C major scale why don't they include the fifth (G) as being easily flattened?
Last edited by Don223 at Nov 30, 2009,
#2
A flatted fifth or fourth interval would be a diminished and not a minor interval like those other ones.
#3
The fifth is rarely flattened because when it is flattened it can create a lot of tension and generally wont sound as "good"
The notes that are "easily" flattened are the notes that will sound "good" without creating a bunch of tension and what not (although I'm not sure about the flattened second creating half step from the root...)
They have named every interval that is not perfect (perfect fourth and fifth) and the third, sixth and seventh are all sharpened to create the minor scale.

I'm not sure if that helps I'm kind of talking out my ass
#4
2,3,6,and 7 can either be major or minor intervals. a 4th or a 5th flattened would diminished
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#5
I feel that the sentence is a little bit misleading. All intervals can be flattened\sharpened however the terms can differ.

Unison
Minor 2nd
Major 2nd
Minor 3rd
Major 3rd
Perfect 4th
Augmented 4th\diminished 5th
Perfect 5th
Minor 6th
Major 6th
Minor 7th
Major 7th
Octave

Thos are your intervals from unison to octave. If you want to flatten the interval then move to the interval above, to sharpen move to the interval below. So Major 3rd flattened is Minor 3rd, Perfect 5th flattened is dimished 5th. Minor 6th sharpened is Major 6th, Perfect 4th sharpened is augmented 4th.

Now if you flatten (for example) a Minor 7th you would probably say it was a Major 6th. However, because it is a 7th and not a 6th that you are altering; you call it a double flat 7th (bb7). The same if sharpening a (for example) a Major 6th; you'd call it a double sharp 6th (##6) rather than a Minor 7th. You don't tend to come across these often. bb7 is probably the most common, when describing a diminished chord.

Now I hope my post isn't misleading!
#6
Quote by Myshadow46_2
The same if sharpening a (for example) a Major 6th; you'd call it a double sharp 6th (##6) rather than a Minor 7th.


this part doesn't seem right to me a major anything is just considered to be a 6, so if you sharpen it, it would be a #6. ##6 would be emharmonic to a major 7th. the reason you would almost never see a ##6 is because it would have to be a 6 note scale for it to work. it would be impossible with a diatonic scale because the 7th would be the same note, or else BELOW the 6th, making IT the 6th.

come to think of it, any example but the 6th and 7th would've worked, you just got unlucky and picked one that was impossible (unless you're talking about a 6 note scale).
#8
Quote by The4thHorsemen
this part doesn't seem right to me a major anything is just considered to be a 6, so if you sharpen it, it would be a #6. ##6 would be emharmonic to a major 7th. the reason you would almost never see a ##6 is because it would have to be a 6 note scale for it to work. it would be impossible with a diatonic scale because the 7th would be the same note, or else BELOW the 6th, making IT the 6th.

come to think of it, any example but the 6th and 7th would've worked, you just got unlucky and picked one that was impossible (unless you're talking about a 6 note scale).


You know what? I'm a tool. Thanks for pointing that out!