#1
Is it true that the state our mind is in affects our playing and our creativity? The answer may be yes, sometimes we're more focused on the guitar and things become easier and efficient.

Now, for example, let's talk about peripheral vision. This is not a "technique" so to speak, but I think it's a capacity that our minds develop and once that happens we find it easier to see the whole fretboard, other notes, other spots and ultimately other ideas, so I think it's obvious that our mind plays an important role in our playing.

Maybe it can become 2nd nature after awhile, but playing demanding parts on the instrument will always require a certain amount of focus. My question is: Is it just focus or are we talking about something else here? Is there a capacity that players should have, or should be aware before (let's say) playing a difficult part?

I'm kinda digging in the specifics of how the mind affects our performance. One example could be visualizing the part in our mind before playing it but I'm not sure about other capacities.
#3
You should go into greater detail of what you are talking about,
sounds like it has potential for an interesting read
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#4
The more you play guitar and the more you learn about music theory and apply that knowledge visually and sonically to the fretboard the more your playing and creativity will develop. You'll be able to translate ideas in your mind (chord progressions, scales, melodies and harmonies) into actually playing them with a guitar without having to search for them for as long.

I've been playing guitar for 21 years now and this kind of thing has developed slowly over time. When I listen to music I can usually tell what kind of chord progressions are going on and can visualize intervals and scales (whether a song is based around major scales, minor scales, blues) and even if there's an exotic interval in there somewhere.

I write and record a lot of music and often I'll be at work or somewhere nowhere near a guitar when I get an idea in my head. Most of the time I can tab it out from the ideas in my mind and email it to myself from work.

After you've been playing a while try to see the fretboard outside of the "box" scale patterns. When you learn scales learn them all over the fretboard and learn what intervals give scales a certain sound (happy, sad, menacing, tranquil... whatever emotion or feel). Its really interesting to learn that stuff. I think that's what brings most guitarists, musicians and songwriters to another level.

Be creative and have fun
Last edited by Abacus11 at Dec 1, 2009,
#5
Experienced players would still have to focus. But you are right, not that much...

Your state of mind really does affect your performance as such. A totally uplifted mood can make your audience smile as you play... A totally depressed mood could make your audience feel out of it while its happening.

But I'll go so far as to say that the mind in a depressed state will not be super creative as when it is in a relaxed or totallyu uplifted state. But I'm not too sure about the creativity when you are in nirvana or samadhi.. because you have to break the momentum of relaxation as you're playing so it may not be THAT "state" that can be achieved.

Perhaps visualising the part beforehand could be the anti climax inside yourself. Wouldn't you much prefer an open palette as opposed to a preconceived one? Sure, there will be parts of the song that follow a natural form and the audience expects that much... but there's the other parts that are better left to the blank canvas otherwise its a part of the song that has to be there... Does that make sense?

So in essence... playing the difficult parts does require concentration... letting go like miles.... that takes knowledge of whats coming and complete despair of the moment taking place as well... state of mind plays a big role like i said earlier... but we can all paint our canvas anywhich way in the end...
#6
Quote by evolucian
But I'll go so far as to say that the mind in a depressed state will not be super creative as when it is in a relaxed or totallyu uplifted state.


Im far more creative and inspired when Im down and sad than when Im uplifted
#7
Quote by symba05
Is it true that the state our mind is in affects our playing and our creativity?


Yes, it's true that our creativity is effected when our mind, the thing that is responsible for our creativity, is effected.
Quote by symba05


Is there a capacity that players should have, or should be aware before (let's say) playing a difficult part?



Yes, of-course.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Dec 1, 2009,
#8
as far as state of mind goes, if i am in a bad mood or something my playing=shit, but if im in a good or great mood my playing is very good.

i usually start playing about ten in the morning and the hour before i play all i do is listen to music and just kind of get in the mood, its kind of like getting pumped up for a football game or something for me it just relaxes me and gets me in a musical state of mind.

its also the same when i try to learn a new song either by tab or by ear ill listen to the song like fifteen times in a row to get the general feel and mood of the song in my head and it really helps me to learn the song faster.

and as for the second nature thing i know for most of the music i write iv practiced it so much that it becomes sorta like second second nature, it still requires a good amount of concentration, but it takes a lot of just feeling it out too.

thats why in almost every song i write i leave at least one or two phrases to just a general outline of what i want it to sound like, and just improvise i usually dont play the song the exact same way twice i always have little differences and nuences that are different just to make sure it doesnt sound robotic like every second is perfectly planned out.
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#9
Quote by xFilth
Im far more creative and inspired when Im down and sad than when Im uplifted


Fair enough. I reckon the majority of the people on here might say that... but spare a thought for those that slit their wrists or pulled the trigger. That part of "down" or "sad" no creativity can be found in. I should alter my 1st reply a bit to include that but yeah, guess its too late.

The state you are talking about would obviously not be the same one I was referring to. That state is a creative one... yes... but not as creative as the uplifted one. If you write sad music, it makes sense to be in that state but not heavily immersed in it. If you are writing happy music, then it makes sense to start off on there or end up there.
#10
Quote by xFilth
Im far more creative and inspired when Im down and sad than when Im uplifted


Maybe you don't need to be uplifted, it is just a creative state that your mind triggers in, whether what emotional content you're feeling in the moment.

Quote by GuitarMunky
Yes, of-course. It's called experience.


Well that's very subjective. Think of athletes running in the Olympic games: I'm sure they all have the same amount of experience, time and effort in their sport but there are differences and mind fitness is one crucial aspect. I think the same can be applied to us musicians or guitarists.
#11
Quote by symba05



Well that's very subjective. Think of athletes running in the Olympic games: I'm sure they all have the same amount of experience, time and effort in their sport but there are differences and mind fitness is one crucial aspect. I think the same can be applied to us musicians or guitarists.

What exactly are you suggesting, or asking?
shred is gaudy music
#12
Quote by Abacus11
The more you play guitar and the more you learn about music theory and apply that knowledge visually and sonically to the fretboard the more your playing and creativity will develop. You'll be able to translate ideas in your mind (chord progressions, scales, melodies and harmonies) into actually playing them with a guitar without having to search for them for as long.

I've been playing guitar for 21 years now and this kind of thing has developed slowly over time. When I listen to music I can usually tell what kind of chord progressions are going on and can visualize intervals and scales (whether a song is based around major scales, minor scales, blues) and even if there's an exotic interval in there somewhere.

I write and record a lot of music and often I'll be at work or somewhere nowhere near a guitar when I get an idea in my head. Most of the time I can tab it out from the ideas in my mind and email it to myself from work.

After you've been playing a while try to see the fretboard outside of the "box" scale patterns. When you learn scales learn them all over the fretboard and learn what intervals give scales a certain sound (happy, sad, menacing, tranquil... whatever emotion or feel). Its really interesting to learn that stuff. I think that's what brings most guitarists, musicians and songwriters to another level.

Be creative and have fun


well as 21 is A LOT of experience could you recommend me some instructional stuff you've used or you think is good?