#1
Not much to it. Just like all you once were, i'm looking to pick up a guitar. I am about 90% sure that I would like to learn with a bass, might work with a guitar later.

So my question is, what did all of you look for or wish you had looked for when you were buying your first bass? As i've searched through Guitar Center dot com i've tried to look up terms as I see them in the descriptions, but I have to admit it's still a bit to take in.

I've also heard I don't need an amp with a bass like I would with a guitar. Is that true? or should I set some money aside for this equipment too?

thanks for the help
Quote by COBHC1
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First lol row
Quote by bloodtrocuted93
They will be twin boys named God and Satan and I will make them fight each other.

http://www.virtual-bubblewrap.com/index.shtml
Quote by sg255
If I cross the street to get away from them, then it's a latino.
#2
Quote by FrankieHCO
Not much to it. Just like all you once were, i'm looking to pick up a guitar. I am about 90% sure that I would like to learn with a bass, might work with a guitar later.

So my question is, what did all of you look for or wish you had looked for when you were buying your first bass? As i've searched through Guitar Center dot com i've tried to look up terms as I see them in the descriptions, but I have to admit it's still a bit to take in.

I've also heard I don't need an amp with a bass like I would with a guitar. Is that true? or should I set some money aside for this equipment too?

thanks for the help


Who told you this? You will need a bass amp if you want to amplify your bass.

What tone are you looking for and what is your budget?

You can't go wrong with a P bass. Ever.
#3
The FAQ stickied at the top of ze page has some great information on starter basses as well as some practice amps.
#4
i agree. fender precision is the way.

Originally Posted by anonymus
I voted "evolutionism", though. Cuz you know... it's sciencey.



Originally Posted by anonymus
We were all created by God...
As Monkeys...
Then evolved.
End Debate.
__________
#5
Quote by grifff
Who told you this? You will need a bass amp if you want to amplify your bass.


Idk, some people on a sports forum I use. He said guitars need amps to amplify because it's not a great sound otherwise, but with a bass, you can sit and play and it would sound fine either way.

Quote by grifff
What tone are you looking for and what is your budget?


What do you mean by "tone"? Like, the sound I want? (alt-rock compared, progressive, etc)

I'm going to wait to see if I get one for Christmas, but if not then i'll pay for it myself. If I had to choose a range, I would say I don't want to show my parents a list of guitars costing more than $500, but I don't want a crappy $125 one either. If I have to buy my own it will definately be atleas $300 and up. I think at that price you can atleast have a chord of decency.

Quote by grifff
You can't go wrong with a P bass. Ever.


What's a P bass? and what other bass's are there?

As you can see by my lack of knowledge, I'm very new to this hobby ha
Quote by COBHC1
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First lol row
Quote by bloodtrocuted93
They will be twin boys named God and Satan and I will make them fight each other.

http://www.virtual-bubblewrap.com/index.shtml
Quote by sg255
If I cross the street to get away from them, then it's a latino.
#6
if your goal is to learn guitar then get a guitar althogh it is a little easy to go from bass to guitar your better off learning guitar from the begining if you wnt to be a guitarist.

if you dont listen to me tho squir P bass is a streightforward bass but for the "best" starter bass i would look for one with two pickups because you will get a wider veriety of tones you can experiment with it and learn more
ESP B-405,Fender American Jazz Bass(EMG J active pups and LEO QUAN BADASS II ) squire P bass(EMG P active Pups)),
SansAmp Bass driver DI
Ampeg SvP PRO Tube Preamp
QSC2450 Power amp
Furman PL8
FINALLY-Ampeg SVT 810E
#8
Quote by epishredder
get a red Rickenbacker puss


I went to the website and noticed when you roll over the "models" tab, there is a 300, 400, 700, 4000 series. What does it mean for a bass to be in one of a, for example, 700 series? So what's the difference between all the series?
Quote by COBHC1
I lol'd

First lol row
Quote by bloodtrocuted93
They will be twin boys named God and Satan and I will make them fight each other.

http://www.virtual-bubblewrap.com/index.shtml
Quote by sg255
If I cross the street to get away from them, then it's a latino.
#9
Quote by Emergancy Exit
if your goal is to learn guitar then get a guitar althogh it is a little easy to go from bass to guitar your better off learning guitar from the begining if you wnt to be a guitarist.

if you dont listen to me tho squir P bass is a streightforward bass but for the "best" starter bass i would look for one with two pickups because you will get a wider veriety of tones you can experiment with it and learn more


Is squir a model by a certain company? or is it an optional trait of a bass?

From what i've read, they are magnets that provide a electromagnetic field that vibrates when chords are played. And what do more or less pickups do?
Quote by COBHC1
I lol'd

First lol row
Quote by bloodtrocuted93
They will be twin boys named God and Satan and I will make them fight each other.

http://www.virtual-bubblewrap.com/index.shtml
Quote by sg255
If I cross the street to get away from them, then it's a latino.
#10
Quote by FrankieHCO
Is squir a model by a certain company? or is it an optional trait of a bass?

From what i've read, they are magnets that provide a electromagnetic field that vibrates when chords are played. And what do more or less pickups do?
squier is a company that makes basses and guitars.

Pickups are basically how your instrument makes noise through an amp, they pick up (see what I mean?) the string's vibration.

Also, playing bass/guitar without an amp sounds fine, except you're barely audible. You could rest the headstock against the wall, though, if you have trouble practicing by yourself, which is basically the only circumstance in which you wouldn't need an amp.
Last edited by Steve08 at Dec 1, 2009,
#11
I would read through the FAQ and then post back with specific questions. The FAQ not only has info on basses and amps, but also other helpful items for the beginner bassist. Also check out http://www.tunemybass.com/bass_guitar_buying_guide/

Its a nice little guide for purchasing a bass guitar.

And to the poster who made the comment about rickenbackers. Very funny. warned.
#13
Quote by ogsi
what about an acoustic bass?


Does it take two different methods to learn a bass and an acoustic bass? I thought if you learned to play a bass, then you could pick up an acoustic and do the same thing.

How exactly are a bass and an acoustic base different? I get the image in my head that a bass is a solid body and an acoustic is hollow.
Quote by COBHC1
I lol'd

First lol row
Quote by bloodtrocuted93
They will be twin boys named God and Satan and I will make them fight each other.

http://www.virtual-bubblewrap.com/index.shtml
Quote by sg255
If I cross the street to get away from them, then it's a latino.
#14
Quote by FrankieHCO
Does it take two different methods to learn a bass and an acoustic bass? I thought if you learned to play a bass, then you could pick up an acoustic and do the same thing.

How exactly are a bass and an acoustic base different? I get the image in my head that a bass is a solid body and an acoustic is hollow.
an acoustic bass is basically just the same thing as an acoustic guitar. There isn't any really different playing, although acoustic basses will generally have bigger strings.
#15
Quote by anarkee
I would read through the FAQ and then post back with specific questions. The FAQ not only has info on basses and amps, but also other helpful items for the beginner bassist. Also check out http://www.tunemybass.com/bass_guitar_buying_guide/

Its a nice little guide for purchasing a bass guitar.

And to the poster who made the comment about rickenbackers. Very funny. warned.


I tried typing in some keywords but it came up with no results. What keywords could I use?
Quote by COBHC1
I lol'd

First lol row
Quote by bloodtrocuted93
They will be twin boys named God and Satan and I will make them fight each other.

http://www.virtual-bubblewrap.com/index.shtml
Quote by sg255
If I cross the street to get away from them, then it's a latino.
#16
I would suggest a Fender Standard Precision Bass (or a Squire Vintage modified precision bass) if you are just starting. That was my first bass and it served me well for a while until i knew where i wanted to go from there.

for an amp i would suggest getting a fender rumble 15 as your first amp, i had one and before i upgraded to a 1/2 stack it served me well.

The person who said get a Rickenbacker is screwing with you. Ricks are expensive and very a very specific clientele.

if you have any questions about what i was saying or anything else just ask me
I shot JR

Oh Canada Our Home and Native Land
#17
The FAQ is your friend here, but I'll give you some advice that helped me when I was brand-spankin new to the world of bass and guitar. Go to a bookstore and get a book. Not a music book, but a book about guitars or basses, I have an illustrated encyclopedia about guitars that improved my understanding tenfold when I was new. Something that will explain how electric and acoustic instruments work, how pickups work, talks about manufacturers, etc. Read said book in your have spare time, I've always found a physical book is better absorbed then information off the internet.

If you need quick information wikipedia "electric bass," although its not perfect, it should give you a relatively basic understanding. If you have other questions after that, I'm sure us here at the bass forum would be perfectly happy to clarify things for you

Oh, and welcome to the world of bass
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#18
people, we're talking STARTER basses here! Rickenbackers are not the way.
i'd highly recommend a squier J-bass or a cheap Ibanez Soundgear bass.
and you'll need an amp too, i recommend a cheap squier amp.
Welcome to bass, man
#19
Quote by Drmckool
I would suggest a Fender Standard Precision Bass (or a Squire Vintage modified precision bass) if you are just starting. That was my first bass and it served me well for a while until i knew where i wanted to go from there.

for an amp i would suggest getting a fender rumble 15 as your first amp, i had one and before i upgraded to a 1/2 stack it served me well.

The person who said get a Rickenbacker is screwing with you. Ricks are expensive and very a very specific clientele.

if you have any questions about what i was saying or anything else just ask me


I like the Fender P bass, but i'm afraid it might be a little above my price range. I was focusing on maybe $250-$375, but it seems to be going for about $540. If somehow I can pull the extra cash together it will definately be on the list to look at.

I'm looking at the rumble 15, but i'm not really sure what i'm looking at. What are some of the focul points when buying a bass? and what's a 1/2 stack?

And I figured the Rickenbacker guy was when the moderator warned him and I couldn't find a bass called a "Puss".
Quote by COBHC1
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First lol row
Quote by bloodtrocuted93
They will be twin boys named God and Satan and I will make them fight each other.

http://www.virtual-bubblewrap.com/index.shtml
Quote by sg255
If I cross the street to get away from them, then it's a latino.
#20
If you're looking at an entry-level bass, I wouldn't buy a Fender. They're relatively more expensive than many other entry-levels, and of no better quality (materials or tone).

There are plenty of brands out there that make entry-level instruments. You absolutely have to go to the local shop and try them out. When you're new to an instrument, comfort and ease of play are more important than tone (seriously, the best entry-level bass in the world is still gonna sound like an entry-level bass). Find one that feels right for you. You'll practice it more.

Musicians tend to be loyal to brands, so you'll get all kinds of advice of "buy this brand", and "no, that brand sucks". I was loyal to Fenders until I started playing Ibanez. Now, I own all Peaveys. Remember that this is most likely a temporary instrument. You will either get better and purchase a better bass, or stop playing bass entirely. Don't spend a lot on the instrument (save a few dollars on the bass and spend a couple extra on the amp - you'll always need a practice amp).

Hope this helps.
#21
a Rumble 15 is a pretty cheap but sturdy amplifier, you will need it if you want to paly with anybody as basses are much quieter than a guitar when they are not plugged in.

If you cannot afford a Fender Standard Precision get a squire Vintage modified, it should be right in your price range. But i would suggest if you can find the money spend it.

A half stack is a type of slightly larger amplifier where you have an amplifier head and a sperate cabinet. don't concern yourselves with these right now they are for playing larger live venues usually (or at least that is what i bought it for).

The focal points of buying a bass are
-check to see how it feels in your hands
-try and play it
-make sure the electronics work
-look it over for scratches
-try and play it again
-if you have no clue at all what you are looking at look for another customer in the bass section and ask him/her to tell you if it's good or bad
I shot JR

Oh Canada Our Home and Native Land
#22
Ibanez also makes great basses in the GSR and SR Series.
Damn it! Disable can't use disable to disable Disable's disable because disable's disable has already been disabled by Disable's disable!
#23
If you want to get a Fender, you can usually find used ones for around $300. The Squier Vintage Modified series is fantastic, and is often compared to standard Fender's quality-wise. The Ibanez GSR200 or SR300, and the Peavey Millennium are also worth checking out. For amps, the Rumble 15 is indeed, good, but not particularly great. Other starter amps worth looking at would be the Peavey MAX series, and the Kustom KBA10.

When going to pick out you first bass and amp, the best advice is to try out as many as you possibly can. We can suggest things for you all day, but in the end you'll have to actually try as many basses as possible to see whats most comfortable and "feels right" in your hands.
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#24
Quote by Rising_Sun91
people, we're talking STARTER basses here! Rickenbackers are not the way.
i'd highly recommend a squier J-bass or a cheap Ibanez Soundgear bass.
and you'll need an amp too, i recommend a cheap squier amp.
Welcome to bass, man


What is a J-bass? I kind of deduced that a p-bass is a precision bass. (doesn't mean I know what is means for a bass to be under the "precision" category.)

thanks, i'm looking forward to learning.
Quote by COBHC1
I lol'd

First lol row
Quote by bloodtrocuted93
They will be twin boys named God and Satan and I will make them fight each other.

http://www.virtual-bubblewrap.com/index.shtml
Quote by sg255
If I cross the street to get away from them, then it's a latino.
#25
Quote by FrankieHCO
What is a J-bass? I kind of deduced that a p-bass is a precision bass. (doesn't mean I know what is means for a bass to be under the "precision" category.)

thanks, i'm looking forward to learning.


J-bass is a jazz bass. it is similar to a precision but it has a slightly smaller neck, 2 pickups, 3 knobs (2 volume, 1 tone) and an offset body. A precision has a larger neck 1 spit coil pickup, 2 knobs (1 volume, 1 tone) and an straight body (compared to a jazz). Jazz basses are good basses but i would take a precision bass any day if i was to start all over again.

Here is a possible example of a squire Precision Bass it's under $300

http://bass-guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Squier-Vintage-Modified-Precision-Bass?sku=519638

here is what i would suggest it's $550 but it will last a while

http://bass-guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Fender-Standard-Precision-Bass?sku=501168

As for the other stuff the guy said i would not get a squire amp, at least get one of the cheaper fender amplifiers.

Don't interpret it as i am some sort of fender Wack-o, i actually play Musicman basses.
I shot JR

Oh Canada Our Home and Native Land
Last edited by Drmckool at Dec 2, 2009,
#26
Quote by micbass
If you're looking at an entry-level bass, I wouldn't buy a Fender. They're relatively more expensive than many other entry-levels, and of no better quality (materials or tone).


Yea, I've been refered to Fenders quite a bit, and it's hard to find one under $500. I've liked some less expensive Ibanez and Squier bass'.

Quote by micbass
There are plenty of brands out there that make entry-level instruments. You absolutely have to go to the local shop and try them out. When you're new to an instrument, comfort and ease of play are more important than tone (seriously, the best entry-level bass in the world is still gonna sound like an entry-level bass). Find one that feels right for you. You'll practice it more.


I definately want to go in and hold a few different types and get some advice since I know next to nothing. We've got a very hands on shop called Guitar Works around the Richmond area, so i'll head over this weekend and try to learn some things.

Quote by micbass
Musicians tend to be loyal to brands, so you'll get all kinds of advice of "buy this brand", and "no, that brand sucks". I was loyal to Fenders until I started playing Ibanez. Now, I own all Peaveys. Remember that this is most likely a temporary instrument. You will either get better and purchase a better bass, or stop playing bass entirely. Don't spend a lot on the instrument (save a few dollars on the bass and spend a couple extra on the amp - you'll always need a practice amp).


Yea, I'm trying to keep in mind that this is a starting bass. I wasn't really aware there were actual bass' made at an entry level, I just figured some were simpler than others and recommended for starters. And it's probably smart to switch some cash to an amp, because I just looked at some, and even smaller ones are a bit more than I thought.

Quote by micbass
Hope this helps.


It did, thank you
Quote by COBHC1
I lol'd

First lol row
Quote by bloodtrocuted93
They will be twin boys named God and Satan and I will make them fight each other.

http://www.virtual-bubblewrap.com/index.shtml
Quote by sg255
If I cross the street to get away from them, then it's a latino.
#27
Quote by Drmckool
J-bass is a jazz bass. it is similar to a precision but it has a slightly smaller neck, 2 pickups, 3 knobs (2 volume, 1 tone) and an offset body. A precision has a larger neck 1 spit coil pickup, 2 knobs (1 volume, 1 tone) and an straight body (compared to a jazz). Jazz basses are good basses but i would take a precision bass any day if i was to start all over again.


I think i'm leaning towards a P-bass at this point. If a jazz bass does favor a jazzy sound and isn't just named that way just for it's shape and such (I wouldn't know if that's the case) then i'll shy away from it. I'm far from a jazz fan.

Quote by Drmckool
Here is a possible example of a squire Precision Bass it's under $300

http://bass-guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Squier-Vintage-Modified-Precision-Bass?sku=519638

here is what i would suggest it's $550 but it will last a while

http://bass-guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Fender-Standard-Precision-Bass?sku=501168


Wierd. I clicked on your link for the Squier vintage and came up with the same exact guitar I was looking at on Guitar Center. It looks like it would be a good choice.

Quote by Drmckool
As for the other stuff the guy said i would not get a squire amp, at least get one of the cheaper fender amplifiers.

Don't interpret it as i am some sort of fender Wack-o, i actually play Musicman basses.


I'll probably just get an amp that doesn't sound like complete crap. I'm not to worried about sounding great right now, I just want to learn the ins & outs and basics of the bass.
Quote by COBHC1
I lol'd

First lol row
Quote by bloodtrocuted93
They will be twin boys named God and Satan and I will make them fight each other.

http://www.virtual-bubblewrap.com/index.shtml
Quote by sg255
If I cross the street to get away from them, then it's a latino.
#28
Quote by FrankieHCO
I think i'm leaning towards a P-bass at this point. If a jazz bass does favor a jazzy sound and isn't just named that way just for it's shape and such (I wouldn't know if that's the case) then i'll shy away from it. I'm far from a jazz fan.

The Jazz bass is incredibly versatile. Its called a Jazz bass, but its really a jack-of-all-trades bass. Both the Jazz and Precision can really do anything, there was a thread going a few days ago about the finer differences between the two you could search for if you're curious.
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#29
Quote by FrankieHCO
I think i'm leaning towards a P-bass at this point. If a jazz bass does favor a jazzy sound and isn't just named that way just for it's shape and such (I wouldn't know if that's the case) then i'll shy away from it. I'm far from a jazz fan.


A Jazz bass is not meant to play jazz, it's really nomenclature. It's quite a versitile bass but at lower price ranges Precisions sound better and i think are better basses for beginners because they are really easy to play.

Both basses will do you well but a majority of people (me included) would recomend a p-bass as a starter

To address the people who are suggesting an Ibanez, yamaha, etc. They are good basses but i'd rather have a Fender style bass than one of the more modern looking ones and i think they (fender style) are better for beginners than the other styles.
I shot JR

Oh Canada Our Home and Native Land
Last edited by Drmckool at Dec 3, 2009,
#30
^ its all a matter of opinion. Actually, some would argue that the P bass would be worse off for a beginner because of the chunkier neck when compared to say, a J bass, or an Ibanez like a GSR or an SR. Precisions are fantastic, but it all comes down to personal preference and trying out as many basses as possible to whats most comfortable.
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#31
Quote by Tostitos
^ its all a matter of opinion. Actually, some would argue that the P bass would be worse off for a beginner because of the chunkier neck when compared to say, a J bass, or an Ibanez like a GSR or an SR. Precisions are fantastic, but it all comes down to personal preference and trying out as many basses as possible to whats most comfortable.


Oh of course it's all a matter of opinion, but it really depends on hand size as well

Basically TS try out both styles of neck and decide which type you like. But beware once you play one style other the other you get set in your ways. Me i started with a P-bass and then bought a Warwick and a Stingray5, both of which are known for their large necks. i find small necks weird these days now, i can still play on them but it takes a little getting used to.
I shot JR

Oh Canada Our Home and Native Land
#32
Quote by Drmckool
Oh of course it's all a matter of opinion, but it really depends on hand size as well

Eh, thats debatable. With practice, you can adapt any hand size to any neck. For example, I have unnaturally short fingers and small palms, very little hands. They're really well suited to an Ibanez neck, or a short scale like a Mustang, but I feel perfectly comfortable on an old Warwick baseball bat neck.

Whichever style of neck you play on more, you'll get used too, regardless of hand size. I do agree that if you get really used to big necks, little ones can feel unnatural after awhile and vice versa
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#33
Quote by Tostitos
Eh, thats debatable. With practice, you can adapt any hand size to any neck. For example, I have unnaturally short fingers and small palms, very little hands. They're really well suited to an Ibanez neck, or a short scale like a Mustang, but I feel perfectly comfortable on an old Warwick baseball bat neck.

Whichever style of neck you play on more, you'll get used too, regardless of hand size. I do agree that if you get really used to big necks, little ones can feel unnatural after awhile and vice versa


well of course you can adapt to most things but it's easier to play a bigger neck with bigger hands, especially as a beginner. in the end it doesn't matter, i just like Fender style bodies, as well as warwicks but that's for a different reason and completely outside of the TS's price range.
I shot JR

Oh Canada Our Home and Native Land
#34
It really depends on your budget and what kind of sound you want. However, as a beginner myself, I can't really give you all the science and tech behind, but I can still recommend basses right? Check out the FAQ. It helped me a lot (unfortunately, I didn't discover it until after I got my bass ). Can't go wrong with a Squier. Peavey Millenium BXP 4 is also great. Ibanez GSR basses are pretty good too. Just don't be too cheap with your first bass. You want one that will give you a solid foundation.
#35
i still say if your ultimate gual is to be a lead guitar shreddy amazing rock star guitarist then bass would only slow you down. its a misconception that "to learn guitar you must first learn bass"
ESP B-405,Fender American Jazz Bass(EMG J active pups and LEO QUAN BADASS II ) squire P bass(EMG P active Pups)),
SansAmp Bass driver DI
Ampeg SvP PRO Tube Preamp
QSC2450 Power amp
Furman PL8
FINALLY-Ampeg SVT 810E
#36
Quote by Emergancy Exit
i still say if your ultimate gual is to be a lead guitar shreddy amazing rock star guitarist then bass would only slow you down. its a misconception that "to learn guitar you must first learn bass"


I never had the aspiration of being a killer guitarist with sick solo's. and i've never heard of the conception that i'll need bass skills to play guitar, I just chose to play bass instead.
Quote by COBHC1
I lol'd

First lol row
Quote by bloodtrocuted93
They will be twin boys named God and Satan and I will make them fight each other.

http://www.virtual-bubblewrap.com/index.shtml
Quote by sg255
If I cross the street to get away from them, then it's a latino.