#1
Hey, i have been taking some music theory classes at my high school and have recently learned about scales and key signatures along with modes. I understand what steps and what notes are in the scale but don't understand how i could transfer my knowledge of scales onto my guitar, i would appreciate any help
Thanks
#2
Most songs, if not all songs are based on scales.

I don't know really how to explain it. You just take notes from the scale and mess around with it and you got a song. It's obviously much more involved then that but I'm not one to answer specifics.
#3
ok, i understand that i just want to know how to make a, lets say d harmonic minor scale, and put it onto my guitar. I know that the notes are D, E, F, G, A, Bb, C#, in a d harmonic scale and i know how to put it on one string but how about multiple strings is what i am most curious about
#4
It's really up to you how you transfer from one string to another. there's not really a rule saying that you can only have 3 notes per string, it's just what is easiest for you.

Or, If you are saying that you don't know the notes on the other strings then just learn them.

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#5
You either need to know the notes on your guitar neck, or how to find intervals on your guitar neck. And the notes/intervals in the scale you want to use. Ideally you'd know both the notes and intervals tho.
#6
Quote by osXtiger
It's really up to you how you transfer from one string to another. there's not really a rule saying that you can only have 3 notes per string, it's just what is easiest for you.

Or, If you are saying that you don't know the notes on the other strings then just learn them.

so you can play any note from the certain scale on any string and it doesnt matter?
#7
Quote by VanHalen2195
so you can play any note from the certain scale on any string and it doesnt matter?


Yes.

Most of the time you will have reason for where you play your notes, as there are tonal differences between different strings, and some fingerings are just much simpler to use. Its up to the player really.
#8
Quote by isaac_bandits
Yes.

Most of the time you will have reason for where you play your notes, as there are tonal differences between different strings, and some fingerings are just much simpler to use. Its up to the player really.

Alright thanks for the help
#9
As long as you know where all the notes are and what notes are part of what scale there is really no rule where to go with it, in fact you are pretty much at the point of freedom because there is no restrictions with patterns.

Go Nuts!

Oh and a side note i really like that scale it sounds pretty damn nice :]
Don't Be Afraid and just look across Blue Fields.
You'll eventually see the Fisherman's Horizon.
#10
umm .. everyone is saying there are no rules or restrictions, and they're right to a certain extent. But you said you wanted to be able to play that specific scale on other strings, instead of just one. Well, that's doable as long as you follow the formula of half-steps and whole-steps. If you break that formula [which isnt a bad thing] then you will be playing a slightly different scale.

learning all of the note names on the guitar neck will also be of help to you if you don't already know it.

I'd also recommend studying intervals that are within an octave range.

The major scale is also something you should study.
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Last edited by flea's trumpet at Dec 2, 2009,