#1
So me and my friend both play guitar and we like to jam. The problem is we both love death metal, trash, melodeath, etc...so it's not as simple as just sitting down and trying to sound good together. I wanted to get some advice on playing metal with two guitarists. I understand harmony and we try to come up with licks in perfect 5ths and such but it seems like there should be an easier, more relaxed way of playing.
Like David Gilmour?


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#2
Play more melodic, instead of shredding all the time

At least until you're both good enough to keep up.
#3
either have one person play lead riffs and the other do chords underneath, or play riffs that harmonize in major 3rds, minor 3rds, and perfect 5ths. it takes some time to figure em out rite, but thats just how it is. either that or you could just pick what key u r gonna play in and just go for it
#4
Its the same as anything else, once you lock in with each other and know how each other tend to riff. Then its all a matter of predicting what the other guy is gonna do. Thats how I do it anyway.
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#5
Quote by ZeBubba!
Its the same as anything else, once you lock in with each other and know how each other tend to riff. Then its all a matter of predicting what the other guy is gonna do. Thats how I do it anyway.


Like this, but get a drummer. Bassists are never necessary for successful jam sessions in my experience.

Start with covers when jamming 1st. You'll get plenty warmed up and more confident. Blast some pedal point riffs and experiment with structure. Use 2,3, and even 4 note pedal points. 5 is excessive and beyond the point. That and pentagrams are evil.
#6
come up with some riffs and have a headcuttin duel

the loser must throw their guitar on the ground and walk away
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#7
Quote by lmpguitarist
either have one person play lead riffs and the other do chords underneath, or play riffs that harmonize in major 3rds, minor 3rds, and perfect 5ths. it takes some time to figure em out rite, but thats just how it is. either that or you could just pick what key u r gonna play in and just go for it


Don't use 3rds unless you want to go for an unstable/weird Sound. Go with 4ths (5 frets) 5ths, and Octaves. Whole steps can work, but can work like the 3rds do. If your want unstablity, use a Tritone Harmony.

If both of you are open about Ideas, both of you should compose a riff, and play it with a harmony. If you solo, Get the other dude to give you a backing track, but make sure you give him a range that will sound good for it.

And remember to Communicate. Ive wasted so many practices due to just sitting and playing with someone, and we hardly ever worked together.
#8
Have one of you play a riff and the other solos over it. It's not that hard. Harmonizing to thirds, fifths, and octaves sounds good. Fourths I don't like as much, but others do. Not that hard.
#9
My buddies and I do this all the time. First one of us will come up with a chord progression, and then another person will solo to it. Then we just alternate. It's really fun if you find a good progression. I've done that for over 3 hours straight a few times and it's awesome just making new solos adding little leads to the main chords.
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Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#11
Quote by Cryingstar987
If you want the twin guitar sound two words... Iron Maiden

Or Metallica, or Megadeth, or Judas Priest, or AC/DC, or pretty much any thrash metal band from 80's to now.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#12
True most of the time the two guitarist will play the same riff the same way, then one will go into lead. You dont want to have to many harmonizing parts because it will get old as if someone uses the wammy bar all the time.
#13
Quote by huevos
Like this, but get a drummer. Bassists are never necessary for successful jam sessions in my experience.


You've obviously never worked with a good bassist.
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#14
Quote by Life Is Brutal
Don't use 3rds unless you want to go for an unstable/weird Sound.


3rds works pretty well as long as it's done properly (i.e., correct use of major or minor so the harmonised note fits into the scale), and it's about the most common harmony in the genres the OP mentioned.

Anyway try some melodeath type riffs... A simple one in Em:


A|---7---9---10---9-
E|-0---0---0----0---


Both guitars play that, say 4 times, in unison. Then the first guitarist keeps playing that, while the second plays this:


A|---10---12---14---10-
E|-0----0----0----0----


Same riff but non-pedal notes are moved up a 3rd.

OK it's very generic but it's a start, just build from there.

A few other ideas:
- One guitar playing fast riffs like the above, while the other plays octave shapes, one or two every bar
- One guitar plays riffs like the above while the other plays the root powerchord(s)
- One plays a simple power chord progression eg 1-4-1-5 while the other plays a solo; with these chords the lead player can get away with pretty much anything in the scale.
- Move onto more advanced progressions, twin leads etc. once you're more used to playing together.

Drums or a drum machine is useful but not really necessary.