#1
This question is probably pretty elementary, but something occurred to me while practicing just a few moments ago, that may be part of the reason I have so many problems trying to keep my fingers close to the strings, while accurately hitting the notes, and adding speed.

I'm noticing that I vary what my thumb is doing from time to time while anchored on the back of the neck, particularly during scales.

When running a scale and doing vertical runs (from the 6th string down to the 1st string), sometimes my thumb creeps up higher (almost on top of the neck), as my fingers approach the 1st string. Other times, it creeps downward along with my fingers, so I wind up "pinching" at the 1st string.

I've never had a teacher, and maybe this isn't a big deal, but is there a proper way the entire hand (and thumb) should move, when going up or down strings?
#2
That's really weird, actually. My thumb doesn't move at all, it just rotates. That's definitely problematic. If it's moving to the top of the neck, it makes fretting the higher strings extremely awkward, and if it moves to the bottom it makes fretting the lower strings extremely awkward. Place your thumb somewhere in the middle and concentrate on keeping it there and pivoting your hand from that point.
#3
Quote by SlashYourFug
That's really weird, actually. My thumb doesn't move at all, it just rotates. That's definitely problematic. If it's moving to the top of the neck, it makes fretting the higher strings extremely awkward, and if it moves to the bottom it makes fretting the lower strings extremely awkward. Place your thumb somewhere in the middle and concentrate on keeping it there and pivoting your hand from that point.


I've tried keeping my thumb in place, and I find that as I get from the 6th (low E) string to the 1st (high E) string, I'm curling my fingers in so much that I'm right on the tips/nail and my accuracy quickly drops off.
#4
After more practice, I believe I found a way to hold the guitar that helps me, although I'm not sure if it's technically correct. In fact, I'm pretty sure it's not.

I keep the bottom of the neck/fretboard (next to the high E string) against the part of my palm just below my knuckle joints. I notice that, when my hand hugs tighter to the entire neck, my speed and accuracy both improve, my wrist stays straighter and thus, I have less tension in my entire arm and hand entirely.

I know there's supposed to be a gap in between your palm and the neck, but when soloing, I find it so much easier this way. With chords, I still retain that gap (very much, in fact), and that allows me to reach all over for barred chords and other difficult ones which require a bit of reach and range.

Other than that, though, I'm finding this way of holding the guitar, tighter into my hand, to benefit me greatly.

Can anyone give their feedback here? What I'm going to assume is that I'll get two types of responses or views:

One saying that, while there is a technically correct way to do things, slight variations in anatomy may allow some players to play for comfortably (and thus, tension and injury free), which is ideal, regardless of what the textbook style of holding the guitar is (palm away from the neck), and the other saying that I should really correct this and learn to play with more of a "free, floating hand" because down the road, playing with my hand against it is going to hurt me.

Any input is appreciated. Thanks in advance.
#5
There's no "proper" way, it's going to be different for everyone depending on the size and felxibility of their hands.
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#6
That's great to hear, especially from someone as reputable and knowledgeable as you seem to be on here.

Take a look at this video, if you can: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5BweGp3eTmk

The first guy that plays the warmup, his hand is so far curled around the guitar, and palm so far from the neck, that it made me think I had to play something like that. Is he an exception? 'cause that seems like a lot of curling of the wrist.