#1
Hi everyone. I'm a new user here. My name is Mattias and I live in Sweden. So pardon my spelling mistakes. But I think you should understand what I'm saying, or at least a bit of it

So yeah...

Been here for quite a while reading posts and interesting threads at the forum. I've seen a lot of music theory and scale threads. But I'm not really sure how I should practice them (the scales, that is) and how they work together with chords. I'd like someone to confirm if I use them correct.

So lets say that you have a rhythm guitarist playing an A chord. Do I have to play for example an A pentatonic over that chord? To make it sound more musical?

So lets say that the rhythm guitarist uses following chords: A, E and G. Should I use a A, E or G scale, and play it over those chords to make it sound good?

And how do you practice the scales? Do you divide them into pieces and you learn them one by one, or do you start at the beginning of the fretboard and then move across the fretboard down to the 22 fret?

Someone please enlighten me!

#2
I could give you an answer to this but its going to be unbearably long, Just look up some lessons in songwriting, like how to find chords that are in a certain key, how to find melodies in a certain key, etc etc
#3
Take one scale,
The first note is the ROOT note. Move the scale up and down the fretboard and remember what ROOT note you are using.
The ROOT note determines the key.
Also, If you play a progression, that's in G major, you can play scales in every note of that key that will sound musical.
I'm a novice myself, but I wrote a Dorian progression, and each time the chord changed I could change the root note of my scale.
Also, your English is better than most English people, so don't worry.
On playing the Paul Gilbert signature at the guitar store extensively, my missus sighed:
"Put it down now, It's like you love that guitar more than me!"
In Which I replied.
"Well it has got two F-Holes!"
#4
Basically you can play whatever you think sounds good. so over that A you could play any note that you wanted depending on the sound you wanted to create. However that statement isn't really helpful is it?!

As you are pretty new to theory, I think, I'm not going to go into all the possibilities; just the basics. In your first example (just playing over the A chord) you can use the A major scale, or A major pentatonic

Over the chord progression A, E, G you usually find out what key the progression is in and then use the appropriate scale. Your progression doesn't fit one major or minor scale (it may fit more exotic scales, but I don't know off the top of my head) I would say play A major or A major pentatonic over the A and E chords, and then change to the G major scale over the G chord.

To practice scales I'd find yourself a backing track in a particular key and use the scale over the top to find out what sounds good to you. Try playing in different places over the neck and generally experiment. You can go a lot deeper into the theory. I suggest, if you haven't already, that you look at some of the columns\lessons on this site. The Ultimate Guide to Guitar and The Crusade are particularly helpful IMO. There are links in my sig.
#5
Thanks for the help. I'm starting to understand the basics I think. But it's going to be a bitch memorizing all the notes...
#6
If I was you I'd learn the Major scale, so you understand it in terms of steps and intervals as well as notes. That way you've not only got 3 ways of finding your way around the scale, but you've also got a really good grounding for understanding other scales and chord progressions.
#7
Quote by Nameless742
Take one scale,
The first note is the ROOT note. Move the scale up and down the fretboard and remember what ROOT note you are using.

Actually it's called the tonic, root is a chordal term.

I'd recommend the lessons on www.musictheory.net, they are very thorough.
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#8
Quote by 7even
Actually it's called the tonic, root is a chordal term.

I'd recommend the lessons on www.musictheory.net, they are very thorough.


Yeah. That site is awesome. I'm using the interval trainer right now. It's a bit tricky but with some practice I'll nail them.

I'm studying the Josh Urban's "The Crusade" and I must say it's a good lesson.
#9
Quote by Suttam
So lets say that you have a rhythm guitarist playing an A chord. Do I have to play for example an A pentatonic over that chord? To make it sound more musical?

You don't have to play a pentatonic specifically. You find out what the quality is of the chord he's playing (major, minor, diminished, etc) then you can use chord tones (notes that make up the chord; for AMaj - A C# E), or a scale for that chord/key.

Quote by Suttam
So lets say that the rhythm guitarist uses following chords: A, E and G. Should I use a A, E or G scale, and play it over those chords to make it sound good?

Well, it's pretty much all your choice in sound. But yes you could use A, E, and G scales separately, you could use chord tones over each chord like I said earlier, or just play a scale based around the key (A in this case, whatever quality you choose since you just said the chords, not whether they were major or minor).

Quote by Suttam
And how do you practice the scales? Do you divide them into pieces and you learn them one by one, or do you start at the beginning of the fretboard and then move across the fretboard down to the 22 fret?

Learn the shapes, find the octave templates, find the individual notes, memorize them. Check out this video.
#10
Thanks for the help everyone. I've gotten a lot of helpful replies and I wish you all the best of wishes.