#1
Here's my situation:
-Changed strings yesterday with the exact same strings
-Problem was not there before the change
-Fret Buzz is everywhere on neck but not on open strings

And my question is:
WTF?
#3
You might have lowered the action? I did that on accident a couple of restrings ago
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Last edited by ratracekid111 at Dec 3, 2009,
#4
Quote by ItsOnlyGNR
Newer strings will buzz when fretted. You gotta break em in.

Not a big problem at all, don't worry about it.


I don't remember this happening on previous changes, may be I just didn't worry about it on the last restrings
How long do you think it takes for strings to break in?

Edit: nope, no floating bridge
#6
Restringing will generally give you some buzz.
It's completely normal and will pass in a week or so.

Personally i love that new string buzz.
I love white guitars!
#7
Quote by potatohead_33
Are you sure they were exactly the same strings?


I'm not that stupid lol. I always buy the same strings.

But alright I'll just wait, and see if the buzz goes. It just bugs me because doesn't sound like it's normal, it's too intense.
#9
stretch the strings out a bunch. re tune and stretch again. then re tune. if you did this already then my bad for posting it. i always stretch my strings when i get fresh ones on. just do a lot of big bends with them over across the neck . do the bends all over the neck. it helps. you shouldn't have a bunch of fret buzz with new strings. a little is normal, but the way you put it it seems like that shouldnt be. do you do a string at a time when replacing or do you just take them all off and start with a string free neck?
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#10
Possible things that happened: changed string gauge which could cause the neck to bow since there would be less tension in the string or you changed the action some how.
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#11
you aren't pushing down on the strings hard enough, that is why they are buzzing
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Crank the Mids
#12
either the strings arent broken in yet or the neck relief needs to be adjusted
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#13
If you don't pre-stretch your strings, they'll do that. Like previously stated, lots of big bends. Don't even bother playing anything, just bend and bend away unplugged. You'll feel your strings loosen up and bend easier even in the same tuning. This prevents your axe from slipping outta tune for the first couple days of having new strings, and helps with new string buzz.
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I figured it out.
#14
New strings don't buzz anymore than old ones and only need some stretching to get them to stay in-tune (which is what people should mean by saying breaking in).
A lot of people remove all their strings at once and then retring afer that. This give the neck a short period with no string tension on it and sometimes this temporarily removes the relief. After a guitar is restrung, it will take some time for the neck relief to restore itself and this is mistakenly blamed on the new strings. So, in short replace your strings one at a time (bringing up to pitch) and they neck should stay more stable.
Moving on.....
#15
Normally new strings will NOT buzz. It is kinda hard to know what might be happening with out knowing what kind of guitar it is.
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#16
Quote by KenG
New strings don't buzz anymore than old ones and only need some stretching to get them to stay in-tune (which is what people should mean by saying breaking in).
A lot of people remove all their strings at once and then retring afer that. This give the neck a short period with no string tension on it and sometimes this temporarily removes the relief. After a guitar is restrung, it will take some time for the neck relief to restore itself and this is mistakenly blamed on the new strings. So, in short replace your strings one at a time (bringing up to pitch) and they neck should stay more stable.

+1.53453454223423
#17
Once it is restrung then you need to play it for a while and keep retuning while the strings stretch a bit. You can get a few odd effects to begin with but after a good playing session and couple of retunes then it should be stable then.

If you are still getting buzz after that then its the normal type of small adjustments in the action, relief etc. Unless you have a really low action it should be easy enough.