#1
Hey guys,

I have this PA for my band to use at practices/small gigs. Now the issue is that it has no bass or very little bass.

I've asked people how to fix this issue, and they say "buy subs for it". I'm confused as to how to do this, and how you would connect subs. Also, I'm not sure what "subs" would be compatible with this PA and I'm unsure how to tell. As you can tell, I don't understand PA's nearly as well as I do Guitar Amps, but I'm learning, and now I'm looking for some help.

Any suggestions?
Gear:
ESP LTD Les Paul (Blackouts)
B.C. Rich Mockingbird (EMG 81/85)
Paul Reed Smith SE Single-Cut (Duncan Pickups)
Schecter C-1 Classic (Duncan Pickups)
Epiphone Les Paul
Seagull Entourage (Acoustic-Electric)

Marshall JVM210H + 1960A Cab
#2
What are you running through the PA? Vocals?...are you mic'ing guitar/bass amps?......drums?.......or running instruments directly through the PA?....keyboards...etc. More information would help to get a better idea of what you mean by no or very little bass.
#3
Sorry. I'm having all instruments go through the PA, however the bass guitarist may use his bass amp on stage sometimes. But for the guitar which I use the Line 6 Pedal through, it's hard to get a good bassy punch through the speakers, so I want to know how to hook up subs to my PA and how to know what ones are compatible. I know that my speakers through the PA have two input/outputs, so maybe you're supposed to hook up a sub of a sort to the second port that's used for daisy chaining?
Gear:
ESP LTD Les Paul (Blackouts)
B.C. Rich Mockingbird (EMG 81/85)
Paul Reed Smith SE Single-Cut (Duncan Pickups)
Schecter C-1 Classic (Duncan Pickups)
Epiphone Les Paul
Seagull Entourage (Acoustic-Electric)

Marshall JVM210H + 1960A Cab
#4
Let me see if I have this correct. Your guitar is going directly into your Line 6 pedal (No guitar amp)........then into the PA.

Does the Line 6 pedal have a preamp bult in...and if so, what do you have it set at?
If it doesn't, you may want to try running the signal chain through a DI box between the Line 6 pedal and the PA.
#5
I don't think it has a preamp built in. And that could be possible.

But I still would need subs for my PA either way.
Gear:
ESP LTD Les Paul (Blackouts)
B.C. Rich Mockingbird (EMG 81/85)
Paul Reed Smith SE Single-Cut (Duncan Pickups)
Schecter C-1 Classic (Duncan Pickups)
Epiphone Les Paul
Seagull Entourage (Acoustic-Electric)

Marshall JVM210H + 1960A Cab
#6
You may not necessarily need subs.....I guess it depends on the type and quality of the speakers used with your PA. A 12" woofer should push some decent bass frequencies, but then again it depends on what the speaker's frequency response range is. The typical frequency range for a 12" passive speaker is 65 Hz to 18 kHz.

I'd try using the DI box and messing with the EQ first instead. It's a lot cheaper then buying a sub, then finding out that it doesn't solve the problem.
#7
Ok there are two issues here,; a question about subs and a need to get to grips with the whole live sound thing.

I've started a guide to PA, part four is in the stocks but you could read what I've done so far here
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/the_guide_to/the_guide_to_pa_part_one_-_a_first_pa.html

as to subs they are simply bass speakers, sub-woofers. To use them you need a crossover and an extra amp (usually). There are lots of ways of achieving this and though most subs can be made to work with most PA's they are designed usually as a system so you may need to fiddle.

Basically to use a sub you need to divide the frequencies using a filter called a crossover. By cutting the bass to your main speakers they will give a clearer sound and a lot of the power going to them is cut so you can push more of the mids and highs through them. The bottom 2 or 3 octaves only are directed to the sub. The crossover can be active or passive and if active can be a separate unit , built into the sub itself or built into your amp or mixer. Passive crossovers are always built into the sub itself. Passive crossovers take the output of your existing amp and split it between your two speakers but they don't work well at high powers so you won't see them in many systems. Active crossovers split the frequencies before they reach your amp so you need an extra amp for the sub whilst your existing amp handles the top end. Lots of subs are active subs which means they have an amp built in, often with the crossover too and sometimes with an amp for the top speakers too.

The most popular ways of doing all this is to either have all the speakers active and simply run leads straight from the mixer to the subs and then another lead from the sub to the tops or to have the amps and crossover rack mounted and have passive speakers. There are also increasingly compact systems with all the electronics including the mixer built in to a single sub with stereo tops fed directly from the sub, like a giant computer 2.1 speaker.

Obviously it is best if these systems are designed as a whole and the speakers need to match in terms of how loud they can go and how they share the frequencies and though they are flexible enough for any middling engineer to mix and match most people end up buying a complete system from a single manufacturer.

I hope this makes sense and gets you started, I'm happy to answer any questions.
#8
To get the lower frequencies you'll need some Bass Bins for the most efficient way to get the lower frequencies out of the speakers.