#1
No matter how much I read about it, it doesn't make a difference to me at all. I understand how the intervals are structured, but applying them to a composition still baffles me.

Here is a simple melody from Final Fantasy.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Jpe9y7FZaw&feature=related
This is simply in D Dorian right?
Wouldn't this mean whatever key you're in, the first note you play in that scale will be 'that' mode?
#2
D dorian is suggesting that C is the tonic.
That doesn't mean it is necessarily, but the chords are probably structured that way.

also, dorian is the scale to use when you're just vamping on a minor chord.
#3
Not all the time. A lot of the time yes, but not always. It's what note the composition centers around. Its the note that the composition wants to end on.
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#4
Quote by Babbs
D dorian is suggesting that C is the tonic.


No, D dorian suggest the tonic is D, hence the name D dorian

Quote by Babbs

also, dorian is the scale to use when you're just vamping on a minor chord.


Depends. Why not aeolian? Or even phrygian?
Last edited by deHufter at Dec 3, 2009,
#5
D dorian is just the second mode of the C major scale. Works well over minor chords, because the second chord of C is D minor (I think that's why it does anyway; feel free to correct me).

Looking at it from a theoretical standpoint, the intervals are completely different from D major; instead of D E F# G A B C# D, it'd D E F G A B C D, so there should be a whole new feel to the scale.
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#6
Quote by jda12
Wouldn't this mean whatever key you're in, the first note you play in that scale will be 'that' mode?


It doesn't matter what the song starts on. Alot of songs will start on a dissonant chord as an anacrusis and then move to the tonic, or do something not even involving the tonic. The key your in is defined by the chords. The tonic is where it resolves (The note it is pulling to), and then the other notes can be viewed relative to that tonic to find if its major or minor (or in the rare circumstance modal).

Quote by Babbs
D dorian is suggesting that C is the tonic.
That doesn't mean it is necessarily, but the chords are probably structured that way.

also, dorian is the scale to use when you're just vamping on a minor chord.


D Dorian is suggesting that D is the tonic (and Dm the tonic triad), and C is the subtonic. The chords will be structured in such a way that Dm is tonicized rather than C, while still maintaining the natural sixth and flat sixth in the minor key, which would usually resolve to the parallel major (C in this case) were the chords structured differently.

Dorian isn't the scale to use over a minor vamp. Its one of many. Any scale containing a ♭3 and ♮5 is perfectly suitable over a minor vamp.
#7
So with or without a melody starting on the mode tonic, such as D Dorian, you can just start out by using a progression like; Dm/Am/Dm/Am and begin any note for a melody within the C major scale? Sorry, I hope that somewhat makes sence!
#8
Quote by jda12
So with or without a melody starting on the mode tonic, such as D Dorian, you can just start out by using a progression like; Dm/Am/Dm/Am and begin any note for a melody within the C major scale? Sorry, I hope that somewhat makes sence!


Dm - Am - Dm - Am is in A minor.

If you want D Dorian try: Dm - G7 - Dm - G7 - Dm, and then solo over it with the D dorian scale (all the notes will be as if in C major, only since D is your tonic, it will be called D dorian).
#9
But Dm and Am are in a few other keys too. Why do you say it's only A minor?
#10
Quote by jda12
But Dm and Am are in a few other keys too. Why do you say it's only A minor?
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#12
Quote by isaac_bandits
Dm - Am - Dm - Am is in A minor.

If you want D Dorian try: Dm - G7 - Dm - G7 - Dm, and then solo over it with the D dorian scale (all the notes will be as if in C major, only since D is your tonic, it will be called D dorian).


Dm - G7 vamp pretty much screams C major. You're basically taking a ii - V7 - I and extending it with deceptive cadences (to the ii, over and over). That G7 pulls to C like mad. Any time you put a dominant 7th chord in a progression, it's going to want to pull a fifth down. A decent dorian vamp can just be i - ii. So, Dm - Em ad infinitum could work. It contains the tonic chord and the trademark natural 6 (as the 5th of the Em chord) of dorian, without creating any pull at all towards C.