#1
E-8
B-5
G-5
D-5
A-x
E-x

I would really like to understand these combination chords...what the technical term for these are, how they are constructed and how to apply them, any help would be greatly appreciated!
#2
C is the chord, as it is made up of C, E and G; and the /G tells you that there is a G in the bass - G is the lowest note of the chord.

Here it's because of an inversion (different arrangement of the notes of a chord), but the bass note could be from outside of the chord - you could have C/F, for instance, which would be a C major chord with an F in the bass.
#3
The technical term is an "inversion" and that one in specific is C second inversion (it puts the fifth in the bass).

Basically it takes the basic chord (C major) and uses a different note in the bass (G).

From low to high that chord goes G C E C (5 1 3 1). A standard triad goes 1 3 5, but for purpose of guitar they're usually voiced differently (1 5 1 3 5 1).

Blue Strat explained it way better.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#4
Blue_strat's competely right, what he said
(\__/)
(='.'=) This is Bunny. Copy and paste bunny into your
(")_(") signature to help him gain world domination

LETS HEADBANG TO METAL!


If you give a mouse a cookie,satan will get angry
#6
Quote by jackBrockin2
C/F sounds good that way ? so it would be like F(lowest note) C E G (all higher than the F)?
I don't really understand what you're asking.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#7
Quote by jackBrockin2
C/F sounds good that way ? so it would be like F(lowest note) C E G (all higher than the F)?

It would sound pretty consonant, because F is a perfect fourth away from the root of the chord, C; and it should sound better than (low-high) C E F G, as the close interval of a b2 between the E and F would be extended by an octave to an interval of a b9.

"Good" is subjective though - dissonant chords can sound good too, depending on the context. It would depend on how you use the chord, too.
#8
Understand though, that C/F isn't an inversion because F isn't in the triad/tetrad, it's just a slash chord (a chord with a bass note different from the root note).
Last edited by tenfold at Dec 4, 2009,
#9
Quote by tenfold
Understand though, that C/F isn't an inversion because C isn't in the triad/tetrad, it's just a slash chord (a chord with a bass note different from the root note).

I think you mean F isn't in the original triad, and you would be correct in that.

C/G is a slash chord and an inversion, C/F is just a slash chord.
#10
so its an inversion when all the notes are already contained in the chord...

and its a slash chord when the note is an added note outside the triad?
#11
Quote by blue_strat
I think you mean F isn't in the original triad, and you would be correct in that.

Yeah that's what I meant, obviously not what I typed though.
Quote by jackBrockin2
so its an inversion when all the notes are already contained in the chord...

and its a slash chord when the note is an added note outside the triad?

Basically, yes.