#1
guys, checked and found out certain ppl saying that OM1 is made in US, certain claimed its actually MIM, from the unofficial martin guitar forum, certain insist that ALL MARTIN US ARE HANDCRAFTED, or handbuilt instead of using automation CNC machine such as other manufactureres like Taylors Gibson etc, specifically for their lower line (baby taylor/100/200, Martin X).

any thoughts of it?? really interesting to know about Martin brand facts , gibson as well.

cheers...
#2
The 1 series should be US, but all X series are MIM if I'm not mistaken.

As for being hand built... No guitar in this day and age is actually "hand built". There may be no use of automated CNC machines, but as far as I'm concerned, as soon as you use a power sander/buffer, it's no longer purely hand built.
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#3
The label in my OM-1 says "Made in USA"... so it better be made in the states, if not from Nazareth, PA.

The XC1T Ellipse I tried out said "Made in Mexico" Materials aside, they both played quite well.

I believe all imports/exports have to state where they are made, by law.
--- Joe ---
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#4
Quote by Auriemma
The label in my OM-1 says "Made in USA"... so it better be made in the states, if not from Nazareth, PA.

The XC1T Ellipse I tried out said "Made in Mexico" Materials aside, they both played quite well.

I believe all imports/exports have to state where they are made, by law.


hi there, since urself have a OM1 , wat u think about it? i mean sound,playability,size wise, am eyeing on D1 at 1st, however found that OM or 000 shaped/size guitar are much comfy to play.

fyi been playing a dreadnought since started, so curious to know, or to try one. if possbile will get the OM1 , hope they carry stock... cheers...
#5
If it feels good, sounds good, and is well built, who cares where the thing was made or if it was "hand built?" I have played import guitars that were as good as if not better in some cases than the high end domestic brands.
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#6
Like I said, I originally bought an XC1T Ellipse (MIM), and tried the D-1 and OM-1 before choosing the OM-1. I had NO issues with the build quality of any of them. I A-B'ed the OM-1 vs D1. Both played equally well and sound great. The action on both was a little high, bu that is to be expected. The OM-1 was brighter than the D-1, and the D-1 was louder and deeper. Obviously the D-1 has a bigger body, but a narrower nut (1-11/16") where the OM-1 is smaller with a wider nut (1-3/4"). To me, wider nut was VERY noticeable and the smaller 000 body fit me better. The wider nut is better for finger picking and chord clarity. If you are comfortable with a dread body, then don't discount it without playing the D-1. Do try them both and any others in your price range. If they have 2 of the same model, be sure to play them both. They most likely will have subtle differences.

I went with the OM-1, because it suited me better.


And I do agree with AKC underdog, Hand-crafted or hand made doesn't make it better than one from a factory. Let your ears, eyes, and fingers be your best judge.
--- Joe ---
77 Bradley LPC || 07 PRS CE22 || 11 PRS MC58 Artist || 95/02 Fender Strat || 99 Gibson LP DC Std Lite
06 Ovation Elite-T || 12 Martin GPCPA4
Boss GT100 || Peavey Stereo Chorus 400 || Peavey Bandit 75 || Roland JC77
#7
Quote by captivate
As for being hand built... No guitar in this day and age is actually "hand built". There may be no use of automated CNC machines, but as far as I'm concerned, as soon as you use a power sander/buffer, it's no longer purely hand built.


I know of many classical makers that use nothing but hand tools, they enjoy the challenge and the old style way of doing it. i have to agree, hand tools make no dust, its much nicer than using sanders and routers.
#8
Quote by David Collins
There is no universal or legal definition that I know of for "hand built". Esteban guitars probably say "hand built" on the label, as does about every other make coming from China, Indonesia, Korea, etc.

If you take a bunch of CNC'd parts and put them together by hand, you can call it hand built. It doesn't have to mean Geppetto is sitting at a bench under an oil lamp, carving each piece with a knife and chisel, gluing it together with a ball of gut string, etc. It can mean pretty much whatever the person advertising it wants it to mean, short of being fully assembled and finished by robots.

If you think "hand built" or "handcrafted" means constructed without the aid of CNC or any other automated or advanced tooling process, then you're applying your own connotation to the terms without a reasonable basis.

Different people apply different meanings to the term, and everyone has the right to pick their own arbitrary cutoff point in what these terms mean to them personally. There's no reason to assume your criteria are the same as those of the people in the marketing department.

It really doesn't have to matter much in the end anyway. Does the guitar sound or play better if the fret slots were cut by hand rather than on a gang saw or CNC? Does the CNC'ing of a neck make it tonally or structurally inferior to one made with a plane, rasps, and scrapers? Is something lost when you switch from hand cranking a drill to one that lets electricity do the cranking for you? How about when you plug that electrically cranked drill in to a computer to help speed up your measurement and precision? Then why not stick an end mill in it to save you the time in grunt work of rough shaping?

If you want a good instrument, judge the final product for what it is, and don't spend too much time worrying on the details of how it got that way.


A+ Only thing i would add is that a CNC or Milling machine WILL be more precise than anyones eyes or hands or tape measure.....So ill take the CNC machine my self. But Taylor says all there parts are cut with a CNC so they have better tolerances between pieces. But the pieces are put together by people not machines because a machine cant check the fit and finish.
#9
Quote by David Collins


If you want a good instrument, judge the final product for what it is, and don't spend too much time worrying on the details of how it got that way.


This. +520576457832645875874354783y45y5876258 to you. My Alvarez was Made In China; So what? I still love it's sound and feel. It's great. My Strat is a MIM; It still plays amazing and sounds great too.

The only thing about buying Made IN USA is that you're paying for something made in America, which costs more to make because we have a minimum wage, as opposed to places where they don't, therefore making it more expensive. But really, worrying about whether or not a machine made it or not, if it was made in the US or China or wherever, isn't too big of a deal; All that matters really is the final product and if you (the consumer) likes it.
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