#1
First of all, I deeply apologize if this isn't a good place to post this, and if this idea is already being thrown around and I'm just ignorant to it.

Anyway!

I'm by no means a good guitarist, I can play a few chords and throw some simple leads around (currently learning 3 string sweeping right now...going a lot better than I thought...then again it's only three strings...). Then again, I'm also a perfectionist, soo I have a constant need to improve my playing and my practice technique.

The past year has been a good year for practice for me. I probably averaged at about an hour and a half a night, having a few off days, and a few days where I cannot find it in me to put down my guitar no matter how tired I am (and these days, it is very, very often for this to happen)

I've always thought of how to improve my practicing. I thought of something that could prove interesting and I wanted to bring it up here. A few of my friends like the idea a lot.

With this practice regimen, I would be changing things up a bit. I plan to implement it at the start of the new year.

-- Now that that bit of rambling is out of the way, I can actually talk about it... --

So here's the deal. On the first week, I choose my left hand, and I more or less focus my technique and efforts into mostly working on my left hand for that week. Obviously I wouldn't JUST be doing a bunch of leads with no attention to rhythm, but I'd be trying to zero in on it.

Then, of course, the next week, I choose my right hand, and work on that in a similiar way to my left hand the week before.

And then I start on the left hand...rinse, repeat, etc...


Now, sometimes regimens sound boring and can be hard to maintain if habits are not formed. One of the appeals is that there's many different ways I could twist things, and the fact that every week, I'd be changing things up will hopefully prove very fruitful to this...


So now...I kindly would like to ask for people's feedback, opinions, and potential improvements that I could try with this...and if anyone else actually does this, or even if anyone likes this idea and decides to take this for themselves (I'd be quite honored)
#2
Most peoples biggest problem is trying to get their fretting and picking hands in synch with one another - I'm not sure how focussing on them independently so much would help with that.
#3
you can pick as fast as you want with the right hand but it will sound not so good if your left hand is not in sync with it.

Your hands aren't separate by any means, even if you're doing 100% pull offs and hammer ons, your right hand should still be involved in muting.
^Note: Probably sarcastic
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#4
Well another way to look at it, and I think I made it a little vague, is that one week, you'd be working on leads and solos and stuff like that, while during the next week, you would more or less be focusing on rhythm guitar and riffing and stuff...obviously you wouldn't be doing either exclusively, but putting at least a leaning on the left or right hand, if that makes sense.

I definately see what you're saying, and it's not like you wouldn't be dealing with that as well, but I sorta see this regimen as a way to help your technique for both hands.
#5
In that case I wouldn't put the focus on different hands so much on different stypes or techniques. Unless you are planning on using legato for everything your picking hand plays a pretty heavy part in lead playing, and if you're playing much more than power chords your fretting hand will be pretty busy playing rhythm.

I do agree it makes sense to break things up though, so you can spend some time focussing on what you are trying to achieve rather than trying to squeeze everything into a single practice session so you don't get to spend enough time on any one thing to see the benefits.