#1
So ive searched the site of BBE (and also found out that they owned G&L ) and i looked up the sonic maximiser and tried to figure out what it does... to no avail.

so could someone explain to me what it may be/what it does ??
i have a modest rig which consists of guitar related stuff
Member of the Laney Cult
Are You a PROG-HEAD? I am.

my band : Fragments.
#2
it has to do with phase i believe.

if i remember right (i could be very wrong here) it "corrects" the time differences of high and low frequencies leaving the speakers thus correcting minuscule amounts of phase issues.

i've heard it used a few times and it makes a pretty big difference. of course, so many people dont use it so there's no way you NEED one to sound good, but it really does "maximize" the sound a good bit. and those times i heard it were on a PA and in a studio, so i dont know how much effect it'll have on your guitar rig.
#3
from what i have heard bass frequencies and higher voice frequencies travel at different speeds, so in actuality your ear doesn't hear the whole sound at the exact same time. to my understanding, the sonic stomp is supposed increase the speed of bass frequencies and slower your treble frequencies so they travel at the same speed, this allows the sound as a whole to hit the ear at the same time or close to it. basically, the sonic stomp will sound like you took a blanket off of your guitar amp. this is what i have been told, so im just regurgitating the information to you, could be wrong but im sure its correct.

anyways, i hope that helps and i would recommend the sonic stomp, i think its great.


thomas
#5
Quote by gazungas
from what i have heard bass frequencies and higher voice frequencies travel at different speeds, so in actuality your ear doesn't hear the whole sound at the exact same time. to my understanding, the sonic stomp is supposed increase the speed of bass frequencies and slower your treble frequencies so they travel at the same speed, this allows the sound as a whole to hit the ear at the same time or close to it. basically, the sonic stomp will sound like you took a blanket off of your guitar amp. this is what i have been told, so im just regurgitating the information to you, could be wrong but im sure its correct.

anyways, i hope that helps and i would recommend the sonic stomp, i think its great.


thomas


I don't think thats correct... the law states that

v=freq x wavelength

so that means regardless of what frequency, the speed of the sound will remain constant providing temperature is constant...
i have a modest rig which consists of guitar related stuff
Member of the Laney Cult
Are You a PROG-HEAD? I am.

my band : Fragments.
#6
It's just a brilliant piece of kit. Get one. In fact, get three. Just because.
Time is a great teacher. Unfortunatly, it kills all of its pupils.
#7
so basically just rectifying the phase cancellations of the overtones?

Edit: the video sounds like the guitar is slightly brighter... though it defined the chords amazingly... and i like using large chords...
i have a modest rig which consists of guitar related stuff
Member of the Laney Cult
Are You a PROG-HEAD? I am.

my band : Fragments.
Last edited by kai2demax at Dec 4, 2009,
#8
According to BBE:
The BBE Process—"What it Is"
Loudspeakers have difficulty working with the electronic signals supplied by an amplifier. These difficulties cause such major phase and amplitude distortion that the sound reproduced by the speaker differs significantly from the sound produced by the original source. In the past, these problems proved unsolvable and were thus relegated to a position of secondary importance in audio system design. However, phase and amplitude integrity is essential to accurate sound reproduction. Research shows that the information which the listener translates into the recognizable characteristics of a live performance are intimately tied into complex time and amplitude relationships between the fundamental and harmonic components
of a given musical note or sound. These relationships define a sound's “sound”.
When these complex relationships pass through a speaker, the proper order is lost. The higher frequencies are delayed. A lower frequency may reach the listener's ear first or perhaps simultaneously with that of a higher frequency. In some cases, the fundamental components may be so time-shifted that they reach the listener's ear ahead of some or all of the harmonic components. This change in the phase and amplitude relationship on the harmonic and fundamental frequencies is technically called “envelope distortion.” The listener perceives this loss of sound integrity in the reproduced sound as “muddy” and “smeared.” In the extreme, it can become difficult to tell the difference between musical instruments, for example, an oboe and a clarinet. BBE Sound, Inc. conducted extensive studies of numerous speaker systems over a ten year period. With this knowledge, it became possible to identify the characteristics of an ideal speaker and to distill the corrections necessary to return the fundamental and harmonic frequency structures to their correct order. While there are differences among various speaker designs in the magnitude of their correction, the overall pattern of correction needed is remarkably consistent.
The BBE Process is so unique that 42 patents have been awarded by the U.S. Patent Office.

The aforementioned technobabble aside, the thing does improve your sound; both for guitar and bass. Give it a try.
#9
Quote by FatalGear41
According to BBE:

* Wall 'o Text *

The aforementioned technobabble aside, the thing does improve your sound; both for guitar and bass. Give it a try.


that explained quite a bit... though i wish BBE had a better name for it... like Clean and Shiny pedal or something...

in anycase, it sounds good, ill check it out over the next week or so

Thanks for all the help ppl
i have a modest rig which consists of guitar related stuff
Member of the Laney Cult
Are You a PROG-HEAD? I am.

my band : Fragments.
#11
It's unexplainable. It's magic.
Quote by Marty Friedman
Because I bend in such an unorthodox fashion; the notes kinda slide up and slide down...
#13
Completely off topic rant:

I hate the sonic maximiser pedals; ignoring all the marketing hype all it does (as far as I can tell) is increase the presence and reduce the high mids. This is great if your rig is muddy and bass orientated and will help with cut. However I find it pointless, in my experience re-eqing or adding a graphic EQ in the loop will do the same thing and be more flexible.


Then again it appears to be a "metal" thing and I'm about as far from metal as can be these days.


For sale: Early 1985 Ibanez AH10 (Allan Holdsworth signature model) PM for details
#14
Quote by power freak
Completely off topic rant:

I hate the sonic maximiser pedals; ignoring all the marketing hype all it does (as far as I can tell) is increase the presence and reduce the high mids. This is great if your rig is muddy and bass orientated and will help with cut. However I find it pointless, in my experience re-eqing or adding a graphic EQ in the loop will do the same thing and be more flexible.


Then again it appears to be a "metal" thing and I'm about as far from metal as can be these days.




HAHA thats exactly what i did... i kinda have to agree with you, although i don`t hate the pedal, if you want more low end without having to think about EQing it`s a great pedal, but if you want way more control over your tone the MXR 108 is a wayyy better choice
#15
Bottom line: an EQ is always better/more versatile than a Sonic Maximizer.