#1
Does anyone know of any songs with good solos over a ii-IV-I-V progression? I'm working on a Fm-Ab-Eb-Bb progression and would like to get a bit of inspiration. Thanks!
#3
Quote by jailedmenonly
well go modal. If you're in the key of Eb Major? you'll be in F Dorial isn't it?


You can't play F Dorian over a chord progression that is in Eb major, that simply doesn't make any sense.
#4
Quote by jailedmenonly
well go modal. If you're in the key of Eb Major? you'll be in F Dorial isn't it?


If you're in the key of Eb major you should play Eb major or the pentatonic derivates.
F dorian doesnt make sense, since the song is in Eb and not in F. By the way, it's doriaN.
#5
Fair enough, but does anyone know any songs with solos over this progression?
#7
i dont know any songs but yes the modal suggestion but you would have to be C natural minor i think in the key of Eb and Bb mixolydian, and it is F dorian because it contains the same notes as the D# or Eb major.

arpeggios are another good idea, to outline the chord, in that way your playing more of the changes.
#8
oh and be careful to make sure all the scale notes fit with the chords, speaking of this you could use 7th chords, so for the ii and the IV you would use min7 chords, for the V dominant chords and for the I maj7 chords.

there a bit more jazzy
#10
Quote by Myshadow46_2
It isn't a common progression (so far as I'm aware, which to be honest means nothing!) Maybe ask in MT's ONLY "suggest me a song" thread

Oh, and metaladdict123 you need to read the Mode sticky, that should help you stop giving out incorrect information about modes.


tell me how it is incorrect
#11
in C major the relative minor would be A natural minor, G mixolydian would also contain the same notes, D dorian would also contain the same notes, E phrigian would also count because they all contain the same fukcing notes. How is that wrong

I dont use locrian or lydian much
#12
Quote by metaladdict123
in C major the relative minor would be A natural minor, G mixolydian would also contain the same notes, D dorian would also contain the same notes, E phrigian would also count because they all contain the same fukcing notes. How is that wrong

I dont use locrian or lydian much

because those modes are keys themselves. you cant use A minor over a C major progression, it would be called using the C major scale. although they use the same notes, their intervals provide a different sound. seeing as the TONIC is C major, you will be using the C major scale. If the song is using notes in the C major scale, but it pulls to D minor (acting as a tonic) only then can u say u use the D dorian scale. Same with phrygian, you would need the song to pull to E minor, making E the tonic. etc etc. so if you actually READ the sticky, rather then automatically thinking youre right, you might understand this more
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#13
I don't know how to use modes correctly. I just came here to say I really like that chord progression. You have inspired me to write something similar in a different key.
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#14
Quote by Zinnie
because those modes are keys themselves. you cant use A minor over a C major progression, it would be called using the C major scale. although they use the same notes, their intervals provide a different sound. seeing as the TONIC is C major, you will be using the C major scale. If the song is using notes in the C major scale, but it pulls to D minor (acting as a tonic) only then can u say u use the D dorian scale. Same with phrygian, you would need the song to pull to E minor, making E the tonic. etc etc. so if you actually READ the sticky, rather then automatically thinking youre right, you might understand this more


yes its still the shape of these scales but the root note thirds and fifths are obviously arranged in terms of the key e.g c as the root, maybe i should have said you need to keep the value of the notes the same but this does not mean you cant use the a natural minor shape you just have remember where the intervals are in realtion to what key you are in.
#16
Quote by metaladdict123
yes its still the shape of these scales but the root note thirds and fifths are obviously arranged in terms of the key e.g c as the root, maybe i should have said you need to keep the value of the notes the same but this does not mean you cant use the a natural minor shape you just have remember where the intervals are in realtion to what key you are in.

then say "use the minor shape" not "use the minor scale" there is actually a difference, trust me lol
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#17
Quote by Zinnie
then say "use the minor shape" not "use the minor scale" there is actually a difference, trust me lol


yes i should of said that but that dosent mean i was completely wrong just the wrong word
#18
Quote by metaladdict123
yes i should of said that but that dosent mean i was completely wrong just the wrong word


Well, no, you were completely wrong. 1 + 1 = 2, if you say 3 it's wrong, even if you mean 2
#19
Start by playing every chord as an arpeggio, linking them all together as closely as possible (for example have maybe the A in the F chord go to the Ab in the next chord) and then when that becomes second nature, add notes that aren't in the chord as like passing tones to make little melodies. That's what like, 90% of my jazz improv is based on.
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#20
Quote by metaladdict123
C natural minor i think in the key of Eb and Bb mixolydian,


C natural minor can't be in the key of Eb or Bb mixolydian as it's tonic is Cm; not Eb or Bb.

Quote by metaladdict123
and it is F dorian because it contains the same notes as the D# or Eb major.


Zinnie pretty much explained this. The progression would have to resolve to F and highlight the natural 6th of the dorian scale.
Last edited by Myshadow46_2 at Dec 7, 2009,
#21
Quote by Myshadow46_2
C natural minor can't be in the key of Eb or Bb mixolydian as it's tonic is Cm; not Eb or Bb.


Zinnie pretty much explained this. The progression would have to resolve to F and highlight the natural 6th of the dorian scale.


go to this website

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php?scch=D%23%2FEb&scchnam=Major&get2=Get&t=0&choice=1

you can see the c natural minor shape above the D# major, so its the C natural minor shape but the notes are all related to the Eb major e.g. Eb still being the root note
#23
Quote by metaladdict123
go to this website

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php?scch=D%23%2FEb&scchnam=Major&get2=Get&t=0&choice=1

you can see the c natural minor shape above the D# major, so its the C natural minor shape but the notes are all related to the Eb major e.g. Eb still being the root note


Shapes have nothing to do with this. And our discussion is completely off topic so we're stopping it hear. Continue to message my profile if you want to discuss this further.

TS - sorry for taking this off topic and sorry I couldn't provide any song suggestions.
#24
Use the E major scale over the progression, but make sure that over each individual chord you think about what notes are the important ones to hit (third and seventh) and try to hit them.

Also, don't feel forced to use the full major scale all the time. If you ever find yourself lost get down to basics and just use pentatonics. Better to play simple stuff that's in key than complicated stuff that's completely out.