#1
Ok basically I keep my epiphone les paul in a hard case, and I had studio today, when I got to the studio, I pulled out the Les Paul, and it was wet, so I dried it down

basically, what caused this? it is winter obviously, but I've been told the best place to keep an electric guitar is in a hard case all the time?

can anyone explain what happened? haha

cheers
#2
It was warmer in the case then outside. Think of it like your windshield fogging up while having having sex in a car in the winter or your bathroom after a hot shower.
Originally posted by arrrgg
When my grandpa comes over to visit, after his shower, he walks around naked to dry off
#5
Quote by Cherry_09
yeaaa man but why was it wet? have u ever experienced this


I think he completely answered you. It was wet beacuse the water on the air condensed inside the case.
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Last edited by KrlzGmz at Dec 4, 2009,
#6
The water is from the condensation build up from the heat inside the case. Personally I keep my guitars on stands but they sell humidifiers for cases to prevent that sort of thing.
Originally posted by arrrgg
When my grandpa comes over to visit, after his shower, he walks around naked to dry off
#8
Quote by Led man32
The water is from the condensation build up from the heat inside the case. Personally I keep my guitars on stands but they sell humidifiers for cases to prevent that sort of thing.

Dehumidifiers as well, for those that live in places where it is too humid, like me.
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#10
did you put your guitar in the trunk when you went to the studio? If so, don't do it again.

If it keeps happening, damage will occur but this one time shouldn't hurt it.
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#13
I had a friend that owned a sailboat, and he had these humidification beads spattered here and there to deal with it. I'm sure someone makes a product that would fit in the case with it if you search around.
#14
ya man put those silica packets in your case. they absorb moisture
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#15
Condensation can be a bitch! You can use a silica pack I save a bunch just in case. When transporting my guitars I try and not let them get too cold at all. I'll warm up the car then get the case in the car as soon as I can drastic changes in temperature and have other effects on your guitar aside from a little condensation. If you have to walk or have it out in the cold for some time it's best if you can let the guitar slowly acclimate to the temperature both when your going out and coming in. So if you know your going out leave it someplace where is not too warm like a 3 season porch or in a hall. When you get to where your going do not open the case right away let it sit for a while until it feels warm. If you open a case and it's freezing inside the warm/hot air hits it not only do you get condensation but it could effect the wood itself and the neck.

When you get home take the guitar out of the case and let the case dry out. You can get mold and a musty smell in the case you'll never get out if you don't let it dry completely and it will keep adding to the moisture to the guitar.

EDIT: OH, I almost forgot if it's a nitro finished guitar you can get finish checking/cracking with a drastic change in temperature.


John
Last edited by johnro6659 at Dec 4, 2009,
#16
Quote by johnro6659
Condensation can be a bitch! You can use a silica pack I save a bunch just in case. When transporting my guitars I try and not let them get too cold at all. I'll warm up the car then get the case in the car as soon as I can drastic changes in temperature and have other effects on your guitar aside from a little condensation. If you have to walk or have it out in the cold for some time it's best if you can let the guitar slowly acclimate to the temperature both when your going out and coming in. So if you know your going out leave it someplace where is not too warm like a 3 season porch or in a hall. When you get to where your going do not open the case right away let it sit for a while until it feels warm. If you open a case and it's freezing inside the warm/hot air hits it not only do you get condensation but it could effect the wood itself and the neck.

When you get home take the guitar out of the case and let the case dry out. You can get mold and a musty smell in the case you'll never get out if you don't let it dry completely and it will keep adding to the moisture to the guitar.

EDIT: OH, I almost forgot if it's a nitro finished guitar you can get finish checking/cracking with a drastic change in temperature.


John


dude thankyou so much man you've been a great help!!
#18
The basic problem is that air (like any solvent) can't hold as much water (solute) when the temperature is low as it can when the temperature is high. When you walk in the cold, the air in the case cools, and if it has more water vapor than it can hold at the lower temperature, that water forms liquid droplets.

So the two options you have to prevent this are to keep the humidity in the case down, or to keep the temperature of the air in the case consistent. If the guitar's going to be out in the cold for a while, leave it out to pre-cool with the case open before you close the case and take it wherever you're going. Or just stick the silica packets people have mentioned in the case. My guitar came with silica packets in the box when it was shipped to me.

Also, this may have happened to you before without you realizing it. If you got the guitar cold and let it heat up before opening the case, the water would have condensed on the guitar and then evaporated again when the air heated up before the case was opened. You wouldn't necessarily notice that it had ever been wet.
#19
wash your hands and dry well before playing for long periods or else you get that nasty buildup....

use a non-abrasive cleaner to polish frets and wood treatment on the fretboar, makes maple feel like cotton

use a polishing cloth and make sure that none of your cleaners are corrosive.

when cleaning pickups, remove the strings (duh) and any pickup covers then use a polishing cloth to wipe and clean the poles. any tight spaces should be cleaned with a q-tip sprayed with cleaner.

store in a place where you can keep the temperature from changing often.


you're welcome, I should charge people for this :P
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#21
You can keep the packets in there. Most new guitar cases usually have them already in the case or compartment but they can be found in anything that is shipped. I am pretty sure they can be bought. They really are not needed in warm dry areas some extremely dry areas a humidifier might be needed. When I was building guitars myself I would only build in the winter when the air was at it's driest in the summer the air was just too humid. Companies like Gibson have climate controlled store houses for their wood I didn't have that luxury. Acoustic guitars are more susceptible to humidity and temperature changes and more prone to damage than solid bodies but I like to use the same rules to go by for both.

http://www.daddario.com/Resources/JDCDAD/Videos/Humidity_and_Temperature.pdf

John
Last edited by johnro6659 at Dec 6, 2009,