#1
So I would like to be a good lead guitarist, but many people have told me that I should learn to be a good rhythm player in order to be a good lead player.

I want to know if anyone has any advice for me to achieving this? Any sites i should look at or lessons on this site.

I have started learning my scales. I have the Am scale in the first 2 positions down. I'm working on the rest.

I would get a teacher, but I have no money to do so.

Thanks Again.
#2
Ehm... You dont really need to be a good rhtym guitarist just learn lead lines and tempos.
#3
Quote by Sharkjaw
Ehm... You dont really need to be a good rhtym guitarist just learn lead lines and tempos.


What are lead lines?
#4
If you want to be a good lead guitarist you need to understand what you are playing over, and be able to stay on beat. Plus a solo is only one small part of a song - if you ever want to do more than play in your bedroom you need to some general guitar skills.

I'd just start learning some whole songs that you like that are within your capabilities, and at the same time work on your chords/scales/theory.
Last edited by zhilla at Dec 4, 2009,
#5
Quote by Blckspawn
So I would like to be a good lead guitarist, but many people have told me that I should learn to be a good rhythm player in order to be a good lead player.

I want to know if anyone has any advice for me to achieving this? Any sites i should look at or lessons on this site.

I have started learning my scales. I have the Am scale in the first 2 positions down. I'm working on the rest.

I would get a teacher, but I have no money to do so.

Thanks Again.



Being a good rhythm player will definitely contribute to your lead playing..... and over all playing.

advice for becoming good at leads.....

no sites.... just music

learn a bunch of leads, and play the guitar alot in general........ + time

Good, ol' fashion............. practice.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Dec 4, 2009,
#6
. the thing is to be a good lead player you HAVE to have good rhythm chops, otherwise your lead playing will be out of time. with all things guitar the best thing to do is start slow and make sure your playing is clean and in time and work your way up. i recommend a metronome and ANY kind of recording device (even if its the cheapest tape recorder radio shack has) record yourself and play it back listening for problems, take note of those and correct them. eventually you'll become accustomed to what you're playing and your hands will naturally start to speed up a little.
Last edited by z4twenny at Dec 4, 2009,
#9
i dont think being a good rhythm player would really help. other than timing, they are two different things. you could work on being a great lead player and be in time without playing rhythm at all.

i think what most people mean is you should learn to play rhythm well before you play lead. that way you are a more complete guitarist. some people tend to not care too much about rhythm and focus more on lead. considering most of the song is actually rhythm playing, its a good idea to be a good rhythm player.
#10
Well, I'm a rythem player, I've pertty much mastered rythem and now I'm working on lead,, and I can tell you, it helps you a tone when you understand rythem and are learning lead. If you know what your rythem is playing then its so much easier to understand how to write a lead to that. Cause with rythem you learn all your beats, your strumming patterns, etc and it helps you to know how fast or slow to play you leads, plus, knowing where all the power chords and notes are already, it makes it that much easier to advance in lead and be a overall better guitarist.

Learning rythem first then lead is the easy route and prolly better. Learning lead first then rythem is prolly not reccomended unless you have a teacher. But, learn everything about rythem guitar playing, master it, then move on to lead. Only do this if you want to write your own music effectivly, since you have to lean both parts anyway to program drums, bass, rythem guitar, and lead guitar.
#11
Well if you cant play rhythm, there is no point in trying to learn lead, cuz no band will want a guitarist that will just stand there and chime in for lead lines. Just learn major and minor scales(you can move them to fit a key) in a box shape to start. Then understand the intervallic sequence. For example Major is W-W-H-W-W-W-H and with that you will no how you can move it around the neck. Minor is W-H-W-W-H-W-W(I think). Once you get that down, go into modes and look up the column on phrasing. Those things helped me as a lead player. PLaying rhythm is very important, but i do not see how it helps playing lead.
#12
Playing rhythm will help you develop your phrasing, atleast for me it did.

And god damn to all ^. Seriously to the guy who said he 'mastered rhythm', you've been playing for 3 years, and you have the audacity to say you've 'mastered rhythm'? This leads me to believe you know next to absolutely diddly-squat about rhythm.
Last edited by Kyle.E at Dec 4, 2009,
#13
The two are so closely connected that you can't just learn one or the other. You're best of learning to play music, and using a guitar as your instrument.
#14
Quote by Blckspawn
So I would like to be a good lead guitarist, but many people have told me that I should learn to be a good rhythm player in order to be a good lead player.
Ah the eternal quest. First, ask yourself at what point do you have to get until you'll consider yourself a "good lead player". Do you consider Dave Mustaine a "good lead player" or would you have to be more Marty Friedman or Kirk Hammett "good"? Or would you be happy playing some Claptonesque blues stuff. I'm assuming you're into and wanna play metal though.

I want to know if anyone has any advice for me to achieving this? Any sites i should look at or lessons on this site.

You achieving this, IMHO, is in your desire. Give yourself some tools to get over obstacles you will come across. Like tab, theory ect... BUT, also give yourself every oportunity to figure shit out with just your ear. Don't be intimidated by something that sounds complicated. Try to figure it out over & over as long as you can and if you get to a point where you need tab or advice then go for it. If you're gonna learn a song in hopes of playing it with a band or just a drummer even, then learn it properly, and all the way through! That means LEARN THE DRUMS ! As much as you can, listen to the drums, listen to the tempo, the stops/ starts , rolls , counts....
I'm getting ahead of myself a little though. Most of the advice i'm giving you is based on someone who wants to be able to play the rhythms that setup the great leads and solos you're craving to play. I'm sorry to say I don't fully agree a guitarist can be a "good lead player" without being a good "tight" rhythm player. Again, i'm assuming we're talking metal. There have been guitar players who might be considered a little "sloppy styled" in their rhythms who were fantastic lead players but I don't think there's ever been a good lead player who couldn't follow a beat practically flawless. It all starts there my friend. Being able to play songs like Megadeth's Wake Up Dead or Dimebags Art of Shredding, you gotta give props to the whole song, not just the leads.
It makes me question why you would want to be a better lead player without working on your rhythm. What level are you at now? What can you play from start to finish? At first I wondered if you were maybe just getting bored with playing rhythms but according to your post you must not consider yourself a good rhythm player or you wouldn't be asking.
For those who believe they've "mastered rythem", that statement should come back to bite you on the ass if you're committed to evolving your craft. Some rhythms i've learned have kicked my ass way more than some of the Hammett or Friedman or Clapton solos i've learned. So difficulty doesn't always lend itself to leads breaks only.

I have started learning my scales. I have the Am scale in the first 2 positions down. I'm working on the rest.

I consider myself a "pretty good lead player". I can say that without being arrogant because I try to remember where I stand. Everything's relative you know. I can say that because i'm generally happy with what I can play if I have to play some leads or little fills. That doesn't mean that you couldn't plop me in a room with hundreds of players who could kick my ass at playing sweeps and 8 finger tap-ons ect. I love music, so being in the company of better talent than myself is a treat for me.
The reason i'm telling you this about myself is because whatever steps someone took to become a good lead player, whatever theories they learned along the way, modes, scales, excercises, whatever, you might take a completely different path to your goals. Ask me to play modes and i'll ask you what time it is. Me i learned to play leads with the "box" method. I found it to be a simple way to learn basic pattern that would alow me to improvise a lead in any key in pretty much any rock/blues rhythms. So stick with theories that you understand and don't think you have to understand it all to be satisfied.

I would get a teacher, but I have no money to do so.


Anyone can be a teacher, try finding some friends in your school or neighborhood that are at your level and you'll be learning off each other in no time. Either way, noone here's paying so forget it...

Remember, a long long time ago a wise man once said..."You're best of learning to play music, and using a guitar as your instrument."
#15
rhythm is everything. just practice scales with rhythm
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#16
Quote by Sharkjaw
Ehm... You dont really need to be a good rhtym guitarist just learn lead lines and tempos.


you sir, are a dumbass, obviously you arent a lead guitarist hahah.

learn how to play rhythm, and you'll get your lead guitar timing right.
learn how to play rhythm, and you'll see all the different chord changes that you will play lead over in the future

playing rhythm will definitely benefit your lead playing. it helps with timing, chord modulation/changes, and ideas when playing leads. if you want to be a good, solid guitar player who can improv well, become a proficient/overly proficient rhythm guitarist first.
#17
Quote by JudgeDrey
What level are you at now? What can you play from start to finish?


I haven't really learned any song from start to finish. Just alot of Riffs and some lead parts.
#18
Quote by Blckspawn
I haven't really learned any song from start to finish. Just alot of Riffs and some lead parts.

I understand what you're going through. You wanna skip alot of work and start rippin some solos. I don't know what to tell you. We all have what's most important to us in music. I was in your shoes at one point a long time ago but I knew if I ever wanted to jam with other musicians, especially a drummer, i had better learn some songs properly and all the way through. That doesn't mean I didn't always fiddle with some solos and fills I thought were cool and wanted to try, but i can honestly say I had well over 100 songs that I was confident playing start to finish with a band before I seriously started to practice leads i would actually attempt during jams.

The one thing I made sure of when practicing rhythms, besides making sure I was playing the right notes, was to make sure I could keep the rhythm (ie: tempo) for the song all the way through from start to end when I was just playing alone. If there was a stop and start in the song somewhere, I'd always make sure to figure out what the count was and practice keeping the same pace throughout ect......
And when it came time to learn a lead in a song that I knew the rhythm for like the back of my hand it made it so much easier and logical. If you know the rhythm goes from the key of A to B then back to A, like in Skin 'O my teeth for example (a-a-b-a), it helps you figure out where to go in general when you're trying to figure it out. Hope this helps.

Btw, I have a Warlbeast also.. I never really liked Warlocks but as soon as I saw the Warbeast I had to have one, just plain black, string through body. I don't prefer it to play really technical leads though. It's awesome for nice fast technical rhythms though...verry nyesss

#19
Quote by JudgeDrey
I understand what you're going through. You wanna skip alot of work and start rippin some solos. I don't know what to tell you. We all have what's most important to us in music. I was in your shoes at one point a long time ago but I knew if I ever wanted to jam with other musicians, especially a drummer, i had better learn some songs properly and all the way through. That doesn't mean I didn't always fiddle with some solos and fills I thought were cool and wanted to try, but i can honestly say I had well over 100 songs that I was confident playing start to finish with a band before I seriously started to practice leads i would actually attempt during jams.

The one thing I made sure of when practicing rhythms, besides making sure I was playing the right notes, was to make sure I could keep the rhythm (ie: tempo) for the song all the way through from start to end when I was just playing alone. If there was a stop and start in the song somewhere, I'd always make sure to figure out what the count was and practice keeping the same pace throughout ect......
And when it came time to learn a lead in a song that I knew the rhythm for like the back of my hand it made it so much easier and logical. If you know the rhythm goes from the key of A to B then back to A, like in Skin 'O my teeth for example (a-a-b-a), it helps you figure out where to go in general when you're trying to figure it out. Hope this helps.

Btw, I have a Warlbeast also.. I never really liked Warlocks but as soon as I saw the Warbeast I had to have one, just plain black, string through body. I don't prefer it to play really technical leads though. It's awesome for nice fast technical rhythms though...verry nyesss



So pretty much play a whole song from start to finish with the rhythm part first then the lead part?

I didn't like the warlock either, the warbeast just a hell of alot cooler. The only problem I have with it is that its top heavy.
#20
Quote by Blckspawn
So pretty much play a whole song from start to finish with the rhythm part first then the lead part?


I don't know what your intentions are. If you're planning on playing with a drummer and/or bass, then i'd concentrate on learning a songs rhythm parts all the way through. Then once you have that down pat, you'll be able to throw in a solo here and there because you'll have the rhythm part(behind the solos) down in your head, and so will your bandmates. Quite often you won't even have to depend on a rhythm guitarist. Just look at Dimebag.
#21
Quote by JudgeDrey
I don't know what your intentions are. If you're planning on playing with a drummer and/or bass, then i'd concentrate on learning a songs rhythm parts all the way through. Then once you have that down pat, you'll be able to throw in a solo here and there because you'll have the rhythm part(behind the solos) down in your head, and so will your bandmates. Quite often you won't even have to depend on a rhythm guitarist. Just look at Dimebag.


Typically the bassist keeps the progression down. Solos tend to sound awful without a rhythm guitarist and bassist. (as in with neither, with one its fine.
#22
Quote by JudgeDrey
I don't know what your intentions are. If you're planning on playing with a drummer and/or bass, then i'd concentrate on learning a songs rhythm parts all the way through. Then once you have that down pat, you'll be able to throw in a solo here and there because you'll have the rhythm part(behind the solos) down in your head, and so will your bandmates. Quite often you won't even have to depend on a rhythm guitarist. Just look at Dimebag.


Well for now, its just me. No one that I know that plays an insturment is any good at it or better than me or even at my level.

What i want to do is write one good metal insturmential song. With me doing all the parts. rhythm, lead, drums, and bass.
#24
Well of course if all you practice is rhythm playing, you're not going to suddenly become great at lead one day. You have to work just as hard on your lead playing if you want to make it good. But remember that they are essentially two parts of the same whole - rhythmic consideration is just as important when playing lead as it is when playing chords. You obviously can't just randomly play a bunch of notes when you're trying to solo - you have to make sure that each of those notes is as close as possible to being perfectly in time with the accompaniment.
#26
Pffft dimebag. Look at Alex Lifeson.
Quote by UtBDan
this man hits the nail on the head.
#27
To become a good lead guitarist, requires one thing.

Lots of practice and the willingness to be critical in listening to your own playing. It also takes time.

I teach, and one of the first things I teach is all the notes on the neck. How can you say you know the guitar if the neck is a mysterious black hole that you cannot understand?

So in my lesson series, the notes on the neck is the first step. Next I teach how to effortlessly solo in 4 dimensions in any key on the neck. Once you have this, you then have the notes that you can "go to" after that, it's a matter of application. Find some jam tracks, say in A minor, or G major or any blues, and then get playing. Get yourself in a safe learning environment where you can stretch out and try new things. Look at 4 notes in a scale and experiment with playing them in different orders, articulations (hammer ons, pull offs etc) The common theme here is, time. It takes time for your ear to hear, and your sense of timing develop, but if you start like my students do, at the notes on the neck, and what my online course starts with, then from there, you have the core tools to know how to play lead guitar. From there its focused pactice, and taking the time to learn where to go.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gRzAEgb59-0

Check it out if youd like to learn more about my lessons.

Sean
#28
They answered you pretty well, but I'll add my VINCENTS. Hah, that's my name... :I

Well if you're play the guitar at all, you're becoming better. Rhythm will help with that, help with your rhythm. I'm pretty sure you need rhythm to be a good leader. I mean, I don't know about GWB's rhythm, but how was his leading skills? Get wut I'm sayin? Don't talk about GWB, noobs. Answer his question. Just play the guitar, no matter what it is. Long as you feel it's productive. If you can't find anything productive to learn, in your opinion, find something. Don't quit. Quitters are quitters. You don't want to be one of those lamers do you?
#29
Quote by blueriver
Pffft dimebag. Look at Alex Lifeson.


Again, I assumed he was more into metal. If we're gonna delve into rock, blues and metal, Alex Lifeson is a great example.

As for rock, blues and metal lead guitarists that have made a name for themselves as rhythm and lead
Let's see...
Eddie Van Halen
Jimi Hendrix
Eric Clapton w/Cream
Stevie Ray Vaughan
Jimmy Page
Tony Iommi
Ritchie Blackmore
Mick Mars
Randy Rhoads, Jake E Lee, Zakk Wylde (even though they had a keyboard player, they didn`t need one)

All these guys could go flawlessly from rhythm to lead and back without ever needing a 2nd guitar keeping the progression. This type of players have my uttermost respect when it comes to wielding an axe with confidence and ability.
Last edited by JudgeDrey at Dec 7, 2009,
#30
Quote by JudgeDrey
Again, I assumed he was more into metal. If we're gonna delve into rock, blues and metal, Alex Lifeson is a great example.

As for rock, blues and metal lead guitarists that have made a name for themselves as rhythm and lead
Let's see...
Eddie Van Halen
Jimi Hendrix
Eric Clapton w/Cream
Stevie Ray Vaughan
Jimmy Page
Tony Iommi
Ritchie Blackmore
Mick Mars
Randy Rhoads, Jake E Lee, Zakk Wylde (even though they had a keyboard player, they didn`t need one)

All these guys could go flawlessly from rhythm to lead and back without ever needing a 2nd guitar kepping the progression. This type of players have my uttermost respect when it comes to wielding an axe with confidence and ability.


All of those guys had a bassist to keep the progression down....
#31
Quote by isaac_bandits
All of those guys had a bassist to keep the progression down....


Really? Holy F*ckin shit!?! Are you kidding me man??
Let me guess, you're a bass player.

I assumed the TS and everyone realizes this by know. There is no question all these guitarists had bass players. We're talking about guitar players who didn't need another guitar player keeping the guitar riff going while they went off into a solo, and the song still sounds full and complete for a guitar riff based song.

Gee, I wonder how you got 2000 posts?
#32
OK,

so pretty much what I've gathered from all of this is that to play decent lead is to play some rhythm.

1) learn the notes on the fretboard. (which i have yet to do)
2) Play other peoples songs FULLY.
3) Practice scales
4) PRACTICE ALL THE TIME.

is there anything i've left out?
#33
Quote by JudgeDrey

Really? Holy F*ckin shit!?! Are you kidding me man??
Let me guess, you're a bass player.

I assumed the TS and everyone realizes this by know. There is no question all these guitarists had bass players. We're talking about guitar players who didn't need another guitar player keeping the guitar riff going while they went off into a solo, and the song still sounds full and complete for a guitar riff based song.

Gee, I wonder how you got 2000 posts?


My point was that nobody needs a rhythm guitarist if their bassist knows what their doing, and that very few people can solo on top of just drums and make it sound decent. It doesn't matter if its a guitar riff based song, since all a riff is is a bunch of notes, and any instrument can play notes, thus any instrument is suitable under a solo...

And just so you know, there are bass players who play the guitar riff on their bass during the solo. The fact that the instrument is tuned a bit higher and has 2 extra strings doesn't make it all of a sudden easier to solo over.
#34
Quote by isaac_bandits
The two are so closely connected that you can't just learn one or the other. You're best of learning to play music, and using a guitar as your instrument.


this is the best post in this thread. if you didn't read it before, i'm hoping you'll read it here.

i know i sound like a hippie, but just play music man. i can't stand jamming with those guitar players who can solo all over the neck, but can't stay in time or come up with a creative riff to save their life. do you plan to just play solos all your life? I think I read a post where you said you wanted to write a solid metal instrumental. There's a lot more to a song than just the solo (yes this is true even in metal). What about dynamics? How's your song gonna start? how's it going to end? what will you do to keep it fresh and interesting? will the bass parts be interesting and varied? or will they just follow the guitar (lame)? what about the drums? any odd meters or interesting beats (there are still plenty of ways to make 4/4 sound cool)? I know that's a lot of questions, but i hope you can see that there's a whole lot more to writing a song than just "where does the solo go?"
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#35
Quote by isaac_bandits
My point was that nobody needs a rhythm guitarist if their bassist knows what their doing, and that very few people can solo on top of just drums and make it sound decent.

Hey, sorry for sounding a little off there (someone had just woke me up by slamming a door ), I just didn't understand why you kept pointing out the bass player when we're talking about being able to play rhythm guitar. Sure, all of those guitar players had great bassist but the reason they didn't need rhythm guitar players was/is because they could take care of it themselves. The TS wants to know if he has to be able to play good rhythm guitar to be a "good lead player". Well, if he can't play rhythm for the song while he's waiting for the leads to come up, then it don't really matter how good the bass player is if he's playing rhythm out of key, or time, the songs gonna sound empty or like shit. Unless he gets a second guitar player and just stands there waiting to jump in with a solo.

Yes, bassists fill in wonderfully, at times. Sometimes they're just there to lay down one or 2 notes though, like in Randy's solo in I Don't Know from Ozzy.

Quote by isaac_bandits
It doesn't matter if its a guitar riff based song, since all a riff is is a bunch of notes, and any instrument can play notes, thus any instrument is suitable under a solo...

I'd like to hear Kirk Hammett's solo in Ride The Lightning without a rhythm guitar or Marty Friedman's solo in Lucretia. I think the song would sound like it died off.
Come to think of it, I have played along with backing tracks to those songs and when i found a backing track to Ride the Lightning with rhythm guitar behind the solo it did make it easier to play along with it(and sound alot better), but I was already able to play the solo without the rhythm guitar because I learned the rhythm part behind it.

Quote by isaac_bandits
And just so you know, there are bass players who play the guitar riff on their bass during the solo. The fact that the instrument is tuned a bit higher and has 2 extra strings doesn't make it all of a sudden easier to solo over.

Believe me, I know. Dave Ellefson plays the same riff as the guitar on alot of Megadeth songs, sometimes he doesn't.
Easier? No, of course not if you're a great rhythm and lead player, but if you just know the lead and not the rhythm, I would think it would be easier to play a solo if you have a bass and rhythm guitar, depending on if the original song has rhythm behind the solo. Just listen to the outro to Bark at the Moon, they kept that awesome guitar riff when Jake starts his licks at the end, even though the bass is playing the bass notes in that riff, it wouldn't sound the same. When Jake plays it live though, he makes it sound great without rhythm because he's a fantastic lead and rhythm player.

Either way, I think we both agree a guitar player should be able to play rhythm well before he attemps to play some lead if, hypothetically, he had to jam with just a drummer. I know if I had the opportunity to listen to Eddie play with either Alex or Michael Anthony, i'd choose the drummer because he's great enough to set the rhythm for his leads and fills by himself and I'm sure he'd still melt my face off. Like you said, "very few people" can solo on top of just drums. I doubt any of these few have a hard time playing any rhythms.
Anyways...
#36
Yeah...gotta say I agree with most of the other guys.

I tried to learn lead from the start...which is probably why I'm still a mediocre guitarist after 10+ years of playing. I didn't really get my dose of "wake the f*ck up" until a couple years ago when I got really into Hetfield's riffs and started learning more rhythm.

Since then, my overall playing has greatly improved. I can play just about any rhythm I care to learn...maybe not perfectly, but it sounds decent. My lead is getting better. I've picked up on a lot of bluesy stuff (GnR, Skynyrd) and a few of Hammet's easy solos (Fade to Black intro, Nothing Else Matters, Unforgiven).

Granted, I'm no where near the level I would be had I started the right way - with rhythm. I personally think a sweet riff is better than a mind-blowing solo. It gives a song structure and a solid base.

I'm also going to assume that you're more into metal (which tends to be the trend around here). I can promise you this - if you can learn to play rhythm in metal (try some of the Death Magnetic stuff.....or Avenged Sevenfold), you're overall playing will improve in leaps and bounds. It did for me. You'll also learn a lot about lead, as quite a bit of metal incorporates lead licks into the rhythm.....well, that can be said for just about anything though.

But I digress. To answer your question: Yes, rhythm will improve your lead, but more importantly, it will improve your abilities as a whole.

*Shred hard, bend from the soul, and don't forget to headbang along the way...
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#37
Quote by Blckspawn
OK,

so pretty much what I've gathered from all of this is that to play decent lead is to play some rhythm.

1) learn the notes on the fretboard. (which i have yet to do)
2) Play other peoples songs FULLY.
3) Practice scales
4) PRACTICE ALL THE TIME.

is there anything i've left out?


Yes, but I pose it as an open question to those who suggest it. How long should it take a reasonable guy like this one, to learn and memorize solid all the notes on the neck of the guitar, to the point where he can:

1. Instantly name any note on the neck by sight
2. Instantly play any note on any string (within 1-2 seconds)
3. Visually locate any series of notes all different, on adjacent strings, and play them?

Now, to further tell you what you left out...

Learn the pentatonics only for a while, exhaust them where you can play forward and backwards, up and down in any 4 dimensions. Dont start trying to learn lots of scales, you'll spread yourself too thin. Learn the box scales fr Pent Major and Pent Minor. Get them solid - and then try to break out of the limitations of the Box Patterns as well as the CAGED system.

Once youve focused only on that for a while, then look at learning how to instantly write any Major key, name any triad, and then be able to extract the notes of any triad (to start with) from any major scale.

Of course all these things take practice.

I know this may seem daunting and mission impossible, but this is exactly what I teach in my online course. I invite you to take a look at my video link below and check out the demonstrations and my seminar on YT, and if I can help you, let me know.

Sean
#38
Rhythm guitar is vitally important to give your solos context. If you want to have understanding if what to play you have to know what you're playing over very well and how to respond to every aspect of it. Even if you plan on not playing over another rhythm guitar player (a la Pantera or Van Halen) an understanding of the rhythm aspect of the music is important so that you can complement what's being played.
#39
Quote by Sean0913
Yes, but I pose it as an open question to those who suggest it. How long should it take a reasonable guy like this one, to learn and memorize solid all the notes on the neck of the guitar, to the point where he can:

1. Instantly name any note on the neck by sight
2. Instantly play any note on any string (within 1-2 seconds)
3. Visually locate any series of notes all different, on adjacent strings, and play them?

Now, to further tell you what you left out...

Learn the pentatonics only for a while, exhaust them where you can play forward and backwards, up and down in any 4 dimensions. Dont start trying to learn lots of scales, you'll spread yourself too thin. Learn the box scales fr Pent Major and Pent Minor. Get them solid - and then try to break out of the limitations of the Box Patterns as well as the CAGED system.

Once youve focused only on that for a while, then look at learning how to instantly write any Major key, name any triad, and then be able to extract the notes of any triad (to start with) from any major scale.

Of course all these things take practice.

I know this may seem daunting and mission impossible, but this is exactly what I teach in my online course. I invite you to take a look at my video link below and check out the demonstrations and my seminar on YT, and if I can help you, let me know.

Sean


See the reason I asked this question is because whenever I try to write a song I always just end up throwing out alot of powerchords and I don't want to do that.

I know its because its my lack of knowledge of scales and the notes on the fretboard.

I have watched your videos and they didn't really help me a all. It showed me that you REALLY know what your talking about, but nothing that can help me.
#40
Quote by Blckspawn
See the reason I asked this question is because whenever I try to write a song I always just end up throwing out alot of powerchords and I don't want to do that.

I know its because its my lack of knowledge of scales and the notes on the fretboard.

I have watched your videos and they didn't really help me a all. It showed me that you REALLY know what your talking about, but nothing that can help me.


There's nothing wrong with powerchords. If it sounds good, it is good. Its often helpful to know more about scales and chords, but often times a powerchord is the best thing for the sound you want. Most complicated chords sound awful with distortion anyways.