#1
I'm about to start school for music production and decided I'll try picking up the guitar again. So i'm a beginner wondering what should I start with in regards to acoustic or electric or any variation in those categories.
#3
Hey dude.

I would take this thread to the Guitar Techniques forum. There's alot of knowledgeable people there who can help you.


Now for my 2 cents.

If you would rather sit on a beach at night alone or with some freinds, and jam some Jack Johnson, then I would start with an acoustic.

If you would rather learn all your favorite rock songs, and eventually start experimenting with some different sounds, then I'd start with an electric.

That's just my opinion though, feel free to ignore it.
You can call me Aaron.


♠♣♥♦
Out on parole, any more instances of plum text and I get put back in...
#5
Quote by Anthology87
I'm about to start school for music production and decided I'll try picking up the guitar again. So i'm a beginner wondering what should I start with in regards to acoustic or electric or any variation in those categories.

It depends on what type of music you're most into. If you're more into rock music, an acoustic won't keep you as motivated and vice versa.

So what kind of music are you into?
Banging on a trash can
Drumming on a street light
#6
acoustic is always better than electric, get yourself a decent nylon string classical and youll be in business
#7
Well I like acoustic and such but I'm also a huge Coheed, Tool and APC fan, which is the type of music I want to get into at some point.I want to do both. I'm just looking for a good starting point.
#8
Yeh, I just looked at you're favorite bands list, and I'd say go with electric.

I started with electric, and I'm thinking of buying a nice acoustic sometime.
You can call me Aaron.


♠♣♥♦
Out on parole, any more instances of plum text and I get put back in...
#9
is it there a learning curve between the two. Is it easier to learn on one than the other? Cause I have heard some people say that learning on an acoustic is harder and that you can play on an acoustic; you can play on anything. Or is that just BS?
#10
Quote by Anthology87
is it there a learning curve between the two. Is it easier to learn on one than the other? Cause I have heard some people say that learning on an acoustic is harder and that you can play on an acoustic; you can play on anything. Or is that just BS?



Well the strings are usually a little bit thicker on an acoustic, so it takes more strength to press down, which makes it harder to play at first. They will also wear down your finger tips faster, but you will build callouses eventually.

But the techniques are technically the same.
You can call me Aaron.


♠♣♥♦
Out on parole, any more instances of plum text and I get put back in...
#11
you can play tool and apc and whatever on a classical guitar, just without any gimmicks like distortion

id recommend getting an archtop though, you can get the gimmicky distorted tone well enough but you can also get a nice, smooth jazz guitar tone that 'blooms' rather than 'punches'
#12
Quote by motoko
you can play tool and apc and whatever on a classical guitar, just without any gimmicks like distortion

id recommend getting an archtop though, you can get the gimmicky distorted tone well enough but you can also get a nice, smooth jazz guitar tone that 'blooms' rather than 'punches'





...Ever heard of opinions...?
You can call me Aaron.


♠♣♥♦
Out on parole, any more instances of plum text and I get put back in...
#14
The only thing that makes an acoustic harder to play is the fact that it's more difficult to press down on the strings. That's it. Acoustics and electrics are usually meant to be used differently. For example, power chords sound great on an distorted electric guitar, but they sound awful on acoustics (personal opinion).

Case in point, power chords on acoustic:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W3zvt40ADl8

Power chords on electric:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iTapF7DttJY

Nevermind how you feel about the band and the music they're making, just listen to the differences in the ways the guitars sound.

And here's an example of something played on acoustic that wouldn't sound as great on distorted electric:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ca-9O60e6C4

So really it's all a matter of what you're more interested in. The only other thing that may influence your decision is the fact that you're going to have to spend more money to get a decent sound if you go the electric route.

Oh and one more thing: stay away from nylon string or classical guitars. Forget what everyone else says, you'll hate them.

Quote by motoko
you can play tool and apc and whatever on a classical guitar, just without any gimmicks like distortion

id recommend getting an archtop though, you can get the gimmicky distorted tone well enough but you can also get a nice, smooth jazz guitar tone that 'blooms' rather than 'punches'

You can play tool on a classical guitar, yes, but it will sound like absolute shit. Distortion isn't a gimmick, it's a necessary tool used to achieve a certain sound. Would you consider reverb, delay, and compression "gimmicky" as well?
Banging on a trash can
Drumming on a street light
#15
Quote by motoko
you can play tool and apc and whatever on a classical guitar, just without any gimmicks like distortion

id recommend getting an archtop though, you can get the gimmicky distorted tone well enough but you can also get a nice, smooth jazz guitar tone that 'blooms' rather than 'punches'


[sarcasm] Yeah, but dont use your fingers, those are gimmicky, dont use a pick either, thats even more of a gimmick. If you really want to be an artist, you should put the guitar on the floor and make it make music without your soul. [/sarcasm]
#16
I'm about to start school for music production and decided I'll try picking up the guitar again. So i'm a beginner wondering what should I start with in regards to acoustic or electric or any variation in those categories.


I recommend you start with an acoustic (or acoustic-electric) then move on to electric, it can build your fingers better.
I started with an electric, then went to an acoustic though, and I am good at guitar, lol!
#17
Generally, acoustics are harder to play, but if you learn on an acoustic and then switch to an electric, the electric should come really easy. If you plan on being somewhat of a collector and having 3 or 4 or more guitars, I'd say start with an acoustic. Otherwise, I'd get an electric.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#19
I remember years and years ago subscribing to the "acoustics are harder to play" theory, cause the acoustic guitars we had in our high school music department were terrible, action was so high you needed a crane to get up there, intonated like a dying cat, etc.

Then a couple of years ago I actually shopped around and bought an acoustic of my own (cause I was sick of having to mess around with cables and amps and pedals every time I wanted to play), and discovered along the way that an acoustic doesn't have to be much harder to play than an electric.

Think about how you're likely to play. If you want something you can just pick up and immediately play, you'll get an acoustic eventually anyway regardless of what you start with, but it might make more sense to start with one. If you want to obsess about tone and effects and things, an acoustic won't scratch that itch, so perhaps it's better to start straight out with electric. If you're somewhere in between, try a bunch of both and get the one you fall in love with.