#1
I am a active guitar player and i am now stepping into the world of recording.


I know NOTHING about it and i was looking for some help, simple to begin. As far as these mixing boards and 5200 plug ins, where do i start?
What computer software do i need?

I would really like to start off with a very simple way of doing it and then progressing into all of these recording devices!


Thank you
Its time for tea.
#3
Garageband is certainly very easy, but the built-in effects processing is quite poor. In fact, and this is coming from a huge Mac fan, I find Garageband quite poor overall. So while you could get around the poor effects processing by simply Mic'ing up your amp, the editing software just isn't up to par, IMO. But, if you're short on cash, that's the method for you. I recommend a Shure SM-58 mic. That's what I use for my talkbox.

If you have a little bit of cash, you can put together a very high quality little studio with just a couple things with the price ranging anywhere between $200-500 depending on what you want to do.

For my own set up, I spent around $400 altogether on a Line 6 POD Studio UX1 and the SM-58. The UX1 is quite a neat little toy, it plugs into my computer via USB, and I plug my guitar right into it with standard audio cables. It also has a headphone jack, and a Mic jack, and has outputs for monitors if you want, but you don't need them. I use this to get around the awful Garageband effects. It comes with effects processing software called POD Farm which has numerous amp and pedal sims which sound beautiful, and expansions you can purchase, but I have yet to find that necessary.

As for a DAW (Digital Audio Workstation, your editing software), I recommend you check out Reaper and Audacity, if you're on a budget. The story goes that Pro Tools is unbeatable in quality, but it's a bit pricier. Now, I may be mistaken, but I think Audacity may be 100% free. Reaper on the other hand is $60 for a personal license, but you can download a free, fully functional 30-day trial that doesn't seem to mind going past the 30 day mark. I use Reaper, myself, and I am quite satisfied.

So here is what my signal path looks like:

Guitar --> UX1 --> POD Farm software --> Reaper for recording

Nice and simple, and only $200 with beautiful tone.
Last edited by chrisweyers at Dec 5, 2009,
#4
Careful here....

Software doesn't make great recordings. Great musicians playing great performances on great instruments make great recordings.

Those need to be captured with great mics going through great preamps in a great room, and mixed down through great monitors, but an experienced person with great skill.

If you have all that.... you can make a great recording on a cassette tape.

Great equipment costs great money. Great skill takes great time.

You can make an acceptable recording for really cheap. You can make a good radio-quality recording for a few thousand dollars.

There's a reason why pro studios are so expensive. You cannot achieve at home what Bob Rock or Mutt Lange achieves in a million dollar studio. One vocal mic alone costs into the thousands of dollars. But that U87 put side-by-side against an SM58 is absolute night and day.

That all said... Repear is very good software. ProTools is nice. So is Cubase, which is what I use. Those two are pretty expensive, though. I wouldn't recommend them for beginners. But!! If you buy an interface like an M-Box or a Digi002, it will come with ProTools LE. If you buy, I think it is some Tascam interfaces, it comes with Cubase LE. Those will be great for getting you started.

Beyond that, there is a recordings and riffs forum. You need to take this there.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.