#1
Like lets say you write a melody and you write the notes down, can you know what chords to put just by looking at the melody? Is there a theory behind this?
#2
I have seen alot of lessons where what ever chord you start in that is the key (97% of the time) They say there are some exceptions. So I believe this works in reverse also. What scale are you using in your melody? A minor pentatonic? If so then you first chord will prbably be a Am. Not sure if this is 100% correct but give it a try. Also another way is play the melody and go through the 7 major chords. Which one sounds close? The use different chords of that major, For example, Ama, Am, etc. I'm sure someone on here will give the whole theory to you but that's how I usually look for it. Good luck

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#3
Look at your melody. See what pitches you use. Use chords with those pitches in it.

Say you have a measure that goes like this:

C D E G

Your chord would probably be a C Major (C E G) because the majority of the pitches belong in that chord. The first note in the measure can also effect what chord you use in a big way.


EDIT: Just realized you could do a Cadd9 chord as well. lol
Quote by Tyler Durden
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Erowid
Last edited by RockGuitar92 at Dec 5, 2009,
#6
You can get away with a Dsus2 or an E7 I believe. That is if my intervals are correct. It's like 2:00am and I'm having trouble thinking. lol
Quote by Tyler Durden
It's only after we've lost everything that we're free to do anything.

Erowid
#8
Quote by tenfold
Then you have a lot of options. You must have more than D and E for a melody though right?


Maybe he has a few measures with just those pitches in them.
Quote by Tyler Durden
It's only after we've lost everything that we're free to do anything.

Erowid
#9
It common to have just 2 notes. In the titanic song there are many bars with just E and D#.

Is there any where that has lessons on this?
#10
If you only have two notes (say D and then E) in a bar, then you can look at the rhythm to decide. If the two notes take up half a bar each then you can prob. use a different chord for each, but if one is alot longer then you probably should use that one.

That sounds a bit vague, let me explain:

In four four time, if you have D for two beats, and the E for two beats, each note falls on a strong beat, so you can use two different chords. If, however, the D is for only one beat and the E is for three, you can say that the D is resolving to the E and so just use the chord that fits the E (which is actually an effect called retardation).
#11
Quote by chainsawguitar
If you only have two notes (say D and then E) in a bar, then you can look at the rhythm to decide. If the two notes take up half a bar each then you can prob. use a different chord for each, but if one is alot longer then you probably should use that one.

That sounds a bit vague, let me explain:

In four four time, if you have D for two beats, and the E for two beats, each note falls on a strong beat, so you can use two different chords. If, however, the D is for only one beat and the E is for three, you can say that the D is resolving to the E and so just use the chord that fits the E (which is actually an effect called retardation).


Thanks that helps alot
#12
Quote by ph213x
Like lets say you write a melody and you write the notes down, can you know what chords to put just by looking at the melody? Is there a theory behind this?


Yes, in my series, which I teach online, as shown here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gRzAEgb59-0

If you know triad theory and the composition of major scales and keys, or conversely, the ability to analyze a mode and extract the core chords from it, in triad form, you can with absolute perfection know what chords will work.

Here's why - the same notes in the chords, are the notes in your melody, so they mesh perfectly. You may have stronger tones than others, but you can use your ear and use those notes either to create or resolve tension in the melody, at will.

Sean
#13
the melody should correspond with the chord, so in pop/rock whatever music. so, if you have C and D in the melody, any chord with C and D works fine, such as a CMaj9, although you could use other stuff, such as a CMaj triad (which doesn't have D but it is in the C major scale so it works fine)

in jazz, alot of beginners start off by playing over the changes using the chordal tones, so if you have C and D and you are playing jazz, use chords that contain those notes as they are tones of a chord. CMaj9, as said before, works fine. in blues however, theres that sweet sweet blues sound that comes from tension from the b3 of the blues scale and the 3 of the dom chord