#1
The problem is as following: I play in a metalband, we play own material and some covvers. We have a good vocalist as far as I am concerned, but he blends in with the other instruments making his vocals at times sound monotone and not very "carrying" or standing out.
Now I though perhaps we could fix this problem by transposing the songs to be lower (he has a low voice), so that there is more difference between the pitch of the vocals and the instruments.

Anyone have tips if this will work, or what else the problem might be. And how do I find out how much lower(or perhaps) higher we'll have to play to make the vocals work. We currently play in E standard, and most of our songs are in Em.
Guitasr:
Cort KX-Custom
ESP LTD M-200FM
Amp:
Engl Powerball
Misc:
Focusrite Scarlet 2i4
#2
Quote by pinguinpanic
The problem is as following: I play in a metalband, we play own material and some covvers. We have a good vocalist as far as I am concerned, but he blends in with the other instruments making his vocals at times sound monotone and not very "carrying" or standing out.
Now I though perhaps we could fix this problem by transposing the songs to be lower (he has a low voice), so that there is more difference between the pitch of the vocals and the instruments.

Anyone have tips if this will work, or what else the problem might be. And how do I find out how much lower(or perhaps) higher we'll have to play to make the vocals work. We currently play in E standard, and most of our songs are in Em.



well, just tune your instruments down to a lower standard tuning like D standard or C standard and play the same thing you did in E standard, automatically transposing down to C or D minor (or whatever you tune to)


edit: just to make sure you know, if ya'll decide to start tuning lower you should probably go to a higher gauge string and set up the guitar. like for me a usually use a set of 11's for D standard
Last edited by The4thHorsemen at Dec 5, 2009,
#3
Tune lower, maybe D standard. Experiment until you find the right one and then buy strings thick enough for that tuning.
#4
Quote by The4thHorsemen
well, just tune your instruments down to a lower standard tuning like D standard or C standard and play the same thing you did in E standard, automatically transposing down to C or D minor (or whatever you tune to)


edit: just to make sure you know, if ya'll decide to start tuning lower you should probably go to a higher gauge string and set up the guitar. like for me a usually use a set of 11's for D standard

The transposing itself is not the problem, but rather how I know where to transpose to (e.g., how much lower I'll have to tune my guitar)
Guitasr:
Cort KX-Custom
ESP LTD M-200FM
Amp:
Engl Powerball
Misc:
Focusrite Scarlet 2i4
#5
Maybe your singer needs to figure out a different melody and not match every pitch the guitarist/bassist plays.
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Last edited by RockGuitar92 at Dec 5, 2009,
#6
Quote by pinguinpanic
The transposing itself is not the problem, but rather how I know where to transpose to (e.g., how much lower I'll have to tune my guitar)



it just depends on what you want, how much room you think you need. I'm guessing you're wanting to tune lower so that the singer will be singing at a higher pitch than the riff? if that's the case, then figure out what his range is, what's the lowest note he can hit and the highest, then decide how much lower than his lowest you want to be. I think somewhere around C, D♭, or D would work well, but just do whatever you think is best.

when figuring it out you can just tune down to say D standard, play through a couple songs with him singing, then tune down to D♭ and see how that sounds, then C. if one of those sounds right to ya then stick to it, if not then try going lower. and I wouldn't change strings until you figure out where you want it - just bear in mind that the guitars will sound better with bigger strings in low tunings, so don't let that make you think that it sounds like shit, you're just comparing it to his voice.
#7
Quote by pinguinpanic
The transposing itself is not the problem, but rather how I know where to transpose to (e.g., how much lower I'll have to tune my guitar)

You will have to experiment with that, we're not psychic and know exactly how your vocalist sounds.
#8
Quote by pwrmax
You will have to experiment with that, we're not psychic and know exactly how your vocalist sounds.



speak for yourself, my inner eye says that his vocalist sounds like Dave Mustaine and Kurt Cobain had a retarded baby that tulks kunda lyk thos
#9
Quote by pinguinpanic
The transposing itself is not the problem, but rather how I know where to transpose to (e.g., how much lower I'll have to tune my guitar)


Just try some different keys and see what works for his voice. Or actually figure out what his highest and lowest notes are, and then find the highest and/or lowest notes of the vocals for that song, and then transpose accordingly, to find something that the singer can sing, and is still good to play on the guitar (you probably don't want to tune to G standard).
#10
Quote by The4thHorsemen
speak for yourself, my inner eye says that his vocalist sounds like Dave Mustaine and Kurt Cobain had a retarded baby that tulks kunda lyk thos

I was thinking more of Dave Mustaine and Les Claypool.
#11
You may have to decide to use a separately tuned guitar for a certain song if you are going to have to change tuning to reflect his voice - unless the other songs in your set all have to be changed. What else are you going to do, stand there and tune over and over between songs? Or you may have to locate the chords in the current tuning you are in without changing the tuning, and sacrifce the bottom end on the guitar and assign it to bass instead, and thats a trade off for being able to match the lead singers needs on one guitar.