#1
Ok I realize that there exists a thread with an explanation of modes and I've read it. However it didn't help clear up my questions. Here is where I am at as far as theory. I have mastered both major and minor scales up and down the fret board, as well as the pentatonic scales. This has been very helpful playing in different keys, etc. I understand the circle of fifths and how to harmonized chords for different keys. My questions is this. What is the point of modes. I understand that Dorian starts on the second note of the major scale and phrygian the 3rd etc. My question is then, how would one write a song in a mode. If the D dorian mode for example, contains all the notes in the c major scale, what would make a song in D Dorian as opposed to C major? I think in order for me to progress in learning theory I need to understand this and for whatever reason I am just not grasping this concept. Sorry if the answer exists somewhere else, perhaps you guess can point me in the right direction. Thanks guys!
#2
for it to be modal the chord progression has to resolve to the root. since modes are so unstable it's usually just a 2 chord vamp between the root note and the "flavor note" of the mode. it's kinda like major vs it's relative minor, it all depends on what it resolves to.
#3
So would that mean if i wanted to play a song in D Dorian, for example, I would play something like Dm to C and use the D Dorian scale for soloing?

Another question I am a bit confused about is I saw somewhere where you can use a different scale over each chord. But again if its in one key whats the point?
#4
Quote by queencityguitar
So would that mean if i wanted to play a song in D Dorian, for example, I would play something like Dm to C and use the D Dorian scale for soloing?

Another question I am a bit confused about is I saw somewhere where you can use a different scale over each chord. But again if its in one key whats the point?


well, not quite because the C chord would steal the resolution making it C major. for D Dorian you'd want like a Dm to Bm7b5. since the major 6th is the one that gives dorian it's feel.
#5
Check out the links in my sig. The thing to remember is comparing parallel modes - e.g. D Dorian compared to D minor than comparing relative modes D Dorian and G mixolydian.

Then check out some of xxdarrenxx's posts on modal progressions he wrote some threads on how one might go about writing a progression that brings out modal flavours, and there was one that had examples of songs that use modal flavours.

At least have a listen to Norweigen Wood by the Beatles which starts with a D Dorian sound and later I think goes D Mixolydian if I remember rightly.

It helps to get some thorough explanations from a number of sources and hear examples. If you still have questions fire away.
Si
#6
try reading modal jazz composition and harmony by ron miller, pretty good explanations - provided you know your theory