#1
Hey I have a Gibson Les Paul Studio which I plug into a Marshall MG250DFX and I've been practicing playing on an electric with distortion but every time I play a song the notes (especially chords) sound really garbled with the distortion. So I hear a lot of just mess and not a clean note like I hear when I hear live players. I've been told that this is mainly because of playing technique, so for a few months I've been practicing playing while muting the remaining strings and making sure I don't touch any other strings. So it has gotten much better, also I've turned down the gain a lot so I don't hear my hands sliding across the guitar as much but still the noise isn't as clear as it sounds live. So is there anything else other than technique that professionals use to make a note more distinct and clean under high distortion. And another example of this is chords with distortion when played by bands sounds normal but when I play a chord with distortion on it just sounds like a mess with no really note so all chords sound just like a bunch of noise not really distinct notes. So is there like a pedal, or something that makes a note more distinct?

Thanks
#2
Well first Mgs are muddy amps Sadly I have one too. Its a good thing to touch other strings to mute them. Also trying to use full chords with a muddy amp can sound bad. Other than that its just a matter of practice.
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#3
Maybe it's because often with distortion, people use power chords (in metal atleast, not so sure about early rock music but oh well).
Try it. Play the chords as power chords when you've got some gain on.
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#4
Quote by TechnoLp
Well first Mgs are muddy amps Sadly I have one too. Its a good thing to touch other strings to mute them. Also trying to use full chords with a muddy amp can sound bad. Other than that its just a matter of practice.


We are talking about Marshall MGs, right? They sound best if you don't have the gain all the way up, they can get a little "fuzzy" sounding in my experience.

@rogueleader81: are you using a pedal for distortion, or just using the amp overdrive? Because the overdrive you get on a Marshall is better for Rock/Blues/Doom, and it's nothing like the distortion you'll find faster metal bands using. It's just a different effect.

Other than that you could try changing the EQ a bit, or buying a noise gate. Marshall amps almost always sound awesome, though, so you shouldn't really have an issue.
#5
I'm using just the overdrive on the amp. I was told to get a noise gate and I'm considering it, but would it do much considering I'm only using the effects straight off the amp?
#6
Well first of all the pickups in a Les Paul are SUPER hot pickups - so just a little amp distortion goes a long way. If I were you I'd try turning the gain way down - keep playing with it until you get the proper amount. A lot of it depends on how heavy of a sound you're going for. If you're going for a classic rock distortion - you'd need much less gain, if you're going for something insanely heavy, you'll want to crank the gain most of the way up and work on your playing technique to clean things up. A lot of the really heavy stuff is played with a lot of palm muting with the right hand, which gives you control over how long the notes / chords ring out. You may want to experiment with that as well. You'll definitely not be able to strum open chords the way you can on an acoustic with your setup.

Hope that helps
#7
I'm going for a blues tone. So distortion isn't high. For metal or anything too heavy I don't worry too much about the distortion or garble since the sound is mostly heavy and loud power chords so it overpowers a lot of it. But when your playing playing like slow blues, the notes are long and sustained so a little hum or unwanted noise gets heard easily.