#1
So we have decided to record a couple of our songs again, and we have 2 mics available to us. How should we go about positioning them for optimal drum sound? One above the drums to catch the cymbals and one below to capture the actual drums? An im guesing that pluging the mics to a mixer and then pluging the mixer to the computer is the best way of doing this?
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#2
if i only have 2 mics for drums i usually set them both up as overheads. someone showed me a trick for setting mics up for this and ive found it works fairly well. all you need is the drumkit, the two mics, two drum sticks and two people to set it up.

start with the drummer sitting at his kit. have him take both drumsticks and hold them end to end so they make a single long line. stick one end of that line in the center of the snare (or the place the drummer hits most on the snare). hold that end there, then have the drummer put the other end of the line over one of of his shoulders. put one of the mics at that end of your line. do the same thing with the other shoulder.

this gives you two overheads with the center of the kit being the snare. pan the left mic about halfway left and the right mic halfway right in your mixing program/mixer. this means that all snare hits should sound in the center of the track and everything else should fit the stereo spectrum around it. of course once you have it set up you are going to want to tweak the settings while the drummer plays and you listen through the moniters. just try to keep the same distance from the snare with both mics, but you can go as far or close as you want other than that. i like over the shoulder since it loosly captures what the drummer gets with his ears, but thats personal preference.

one major drawback of this is you arent going to get a great sound of the kick. with two mics you do have to make some sacrifices though, and you can add in a kick sample later if really need it.
#3
not to hijack this guy's thread but that definitely sounds like an interesting way to do it, I'm going to try that next time. But we have 3 mics so I could probably just run the 3rd one into the kick and it'd fix that problem, yeah?
#4
Quote by Thomasoman
not to hijack this guy's thread but that definitely sounds like an interesting way to do it, I'm going to try that next time. But we have 3 mics so I could probably just run the 3rd one into the kick and it'd fix that problem, yeah?


For sure. This will allow a lot more punch from the kick which is needed for a lot of recordings.
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#5
Also the this rule....measure from the floor up to the mics(use a mic cable), this distance should be equal to how far in length they are apart. This is crucial to not creating any phasing issues.

So distance from mics to floor equals mic to mic.
#6
Quote by Falcor Klaatu
Also the this rule....measure from the floor up to the mics(use a mic cable), this distance should be equal to how far in length they are apart. This is crucial to not creating any phasing issues.

So distance from mics to floor equals mic to mic.



Shouldn't that be sound source to mic = mic to mic? This isn't really practical with drums because everything will be a different distance from the mic - but it's a general rule I work to when using two microphones on a single sound source.
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#7
The rule/concept I wrote is for when using the mic's in a standard overhead setup. Should have said that I guess.

Obviously do whatever works and sounds good, but for stereo imaging its just a general approach to keeping things in phase.