#1
Can someone explain these to me? I am reading around on the internet.

I know that Floyd Rose is a whammy bar/tremolo whatever you want to call it.

However I do not understand why it is the "best." When I read up on this subject, there is always "fixed" or "floating" bridge somewhere in the topic which doesn't make sense to me.

Are there a lot of types of tremolos, because it seems people only talk about Floyd Rose and another called "Kahler."

People also talk about "fake" Floyd Rose's. What does that mean?

Why is a Floyd Rose better than a Kahler. Or better than a Fender Stratocaster's "vintage" tremolo.

What is a locking Floyd Rose different from a normal Floyd rose?

If someone can explain or give me a link that is not as confusing as the stuff I am finding.
#2
well theres lots of different floating trem systems floyd roses licenced floyd rose and unlicenced or floyd rose copys then theres off brands such as kyler or ibanez brands such as the edge3 or zr tremelo and locking means that there are screws at the top that clamp down the strings to help it stay in tune
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U sure u want a floydrose? those things will make your nerves explode
#3
a Floyd Rose is a trem that locks the string at the nut and the bridge to hekp keep the strings in tune after the trem has been used

floating means the trem bridge is balanced in place by the strings and the springs underneath

fixed refers to a bridge without a tremolo system, so no movement

original Floyd's are deemed better because they use better materials than licensed Floyd's made by other companies llike Kahler

A Floyd Rose would be considered better than a vintage style Fender trem because the Fender is not locking so the strings may slip around at the nut and bridge saddles while in use

all Floyd's are locking

Wiki has some helpful info and a few good diagrams
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Last edited by justinb904 at Dec 6, 2009,
#4
Floyds are designed to be very stable trems, but they have huge drawbacks associated with them - you're very limited as far as being able to use different tunings, they require a lot of wood to be routed out, harder to change strings, etc etc. They're certainly not "better" than a vintage strat design; the two are meant for very different uses of the whammy bar.

Fixed means that the unit rests on the body of the instrument so you can only push down on the bar to lower the pitch. Floating means the unit is balanced by string tension and the springs so that you can pull up on the bar too.

Fake floyd roses are just what they sound like, companies making poor quality knockoffs of the design.

The floyd is certainly not the "best" unit out there (not that there is such a thing), it's just the most well known trem designed for very heavy use. Don't get caught up in thinking it's the be-all just because it gets the most google hits; there are a ton of other options out there and chances are there's one that fits your needs better than a floyd.
#5
so if it is locking, you can't like down tune to drop c or d or something? So it would be no good for metal?
#6
With a floyd, you more or less set it up for one tuning and leave it there. So you can play in drop C on it, but you'd have to do a little bit of setup work to play in standard. I think standard to drop D is ok though (someone correct me if I'm wrong).
#7
It's not that you cant down tune on a floyd/locking trem bridge guitar, it's that usually there's quite a bit of set-up involved in doing so. Let's say you have a guitar w/a floyd rose bridge that is set up for Standard tuning. Let's say you want to downtune to drop C or D standard. With a change this big, you're probably gonna want to use a different string guage, and you're going to need to set up the floyd to handle the new tuning and string guage. This involves adjusting the spring tension (by opening up the back plate on the body and either adding springs or tightening/loosening the screws), re-intonating the guitar, and possibly truss rod adjustments.

Basically, it's a pain in the ass to do, but that's kind of the price to pay for the advantages and fun of having a floyd rose style bridge. You may want to adjust the intonation if you just want to go from like Standard to drop D, but you can probably get away without having to do all of that other stuff.

Check out the stickied Floyd Rose thread in the Electric guitar section of the forum, there's a lot of great info there.
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#8
Quote by Roc8995
With a floyd, you more or less set it up for one tuning and leave it there. So you can play in drop C on it, but you'd have to do a little bit of setup work to play in standard. I think standard to drop D is ok though (someone correct me if I'm wrong).


far as i know, this is correct with minimal differences to playability and intonation, but it also depends heavily on other factors such as string gauge.
#9
ahh I see that makes sense.

and Ibanez's "edge 3" is just a Floyd rose fake or is it a different kind of tremolo? It looks pretty good, but what do I know
#10
Quote by dyce
ahh I see that makes sense.

and Ibanez's "edge 3" is just a Floyd rose fake or is it a different kind of tremolo? It looks pretty good, but what do I know

Lots of different companies make copies of the original floyd roses because it costs less. The Edge 3 is a Floyd Rose, in the sense that it is a floating, double locking bridge, but its a copy because it isn't made by floyd rose. The Edge 3 is a copy made by Ibanez, everyone on UG says it sucks. I'm not sure though because I'v never played one.