#2
Yes.
Fender '72 Telecaster Deluxe Reissue -> Korg Pitchblack Tuner -> Boss PS-5 -> EHX Big Muff -> MXR EVH Phase 90 -> Menatone Pleasure Trem 5000 -> Line 6 Verbzilla -> MXR Carbon Copy -> Boss RC-2 -> Peavey Classic 50
#3
It may not be professional studio quality, but don't see why it wouldn't be reasonable... Also, maybe try the recording forum?
#4
What model?
I have a Zoom MRS-8

You can get good tones out of it, provided to do not use the amp models it comes with. They suck. Take an amp (a GOOD one) then get a cable running from the FX send loop, into the Zooms input. You'll definitely need to mess around with your settings, more than you would think since you are effectively removing the power amp and cab out of your tonal equation. But you can hear exactly what it'll sound like when you record, which is nice.

You can do the same thing with a bass.

Drums, your only option (other than the shitty drum machine that comes on the Zoom) is to mic a good drum kit, in a good room, with good mics. Run as many mics as you need into a mixer and then take the stereo line out of the mixer into the Zoom and onto a stereo track. It's not ideal, but it's the best you can do.

Don't expect anything amazing with the drums.


The song on my profile is a very simple thing I recorded on my Zoom, using two tracks. No drums.. just clean guitar.
Dissonance is Bliss


Signal Chain:
Carvin CT-4
Ibanez TS-9
Carvin Quad-X
TC Electronics G-Major
Mesa/Boogie 2:90
Ear Candy BuzzBomb



Member #4 of the Carvin Club
#6
I've made higher quality recordings on my Boss BR-600 than I have on Garageband. But that's Garageband.
MATTERHORN
#7
Quote by Doodleface
What model?
I have a Zoom MRS-8

You can get good tones out of it, provided to do not use the amp models it comes with. They suck. Take an amp (a GOOD one) then get a cable running from the FX send loop, into the Zooms input. You'll definitely need to mess around with your settings, more than you would think since you are effectively removing the power amp and cab out of your tonal equation. But you can hear exactly what it'll sound like when you record, which is nice.

You can do the same thing with a bass.

Drums, your only option (other than the shitty drum machine that comes on the Zoom) is to mic a good drum kit, in a good room, with good mics. Run as many mics as you need into a mixer and then take the stereo line out of the mixer into the Zoom and onto a stereo track. It's not ideal, but it's the best you can do.

Don't expect anything amazing with the drums.


The song on my profile is a very simple thing I recorded on my Zoom, using two tracks. No drums.. just clean guitar.



That's the exact model i have the mrs8.It produces good demos,but i think the mastering effects are a little cheesy...no matter how you tweak them.I'm thinking i might need an editing program to mater the final tracks.It's just never consistent with the recordings.Depending on what style i'm recording,the quality can sometimes come out sounding EXTREMELY professional to really homemade sounding.
#8
Quote by cubs
some of my favorite albums were recorded on 4 tracks.


I bet they bounced a lot of tracks though.
#9
I too have a Zoom 8 track, I'm not sure of the model though. At first it suited my needs as a beginner guitarist, but these days I feel it is quite limiting and when it comes to recording my first proper album, I'll pay for studio time or save up for a really nice home setup.

Here's a couple of things I recorded years ago, shortly after getting the machine: http://www.audiostreet.net/artist.aspx?artistid=6133

I'd only been playing for 2 years, so I didn't know my shit very well, but tbh I think I'd be hard pressed to get a much better sound out of the machine these days. Probably 20 - 30% better sounding, and that would still be quite rough. So in conclusion, I'd cough up the dough for as professional as a recording as possible, if you want to make a nice sounding album.