#1
Hey, need some help with figuring out the key signatures of:
Hearts Burst Into Fire - Bullet for my Valentine
Arms of Sorrow - Killswitch engage
Any help would be very much appreciated.
#2
For Hearts Burst Into Fire, it modulates between Eb major and C minor throughout the song (that's 3 flats btw).
Haven't heard Arms of Sorrow.
#5
Quote by MaXiMuse
Arms of Sorrow is in F-Aeolion as I see it...


F-aeolian is not a key, F minor is.

Quote by MaXiMuse
Ebmajor and Cminor are the same


They're absolutely not the same. Eb major resolves to Eb and C minor resolves to C.
Only the notes (enharmonically) are the same.
#6
Quote by deHufter
F-aeolian is not a key, F minor is.


They're absolutely not the same. Eb major resolves to Eb and C minor resolves to C.
Only the notes (enharmonically) are the same.


Aeolian is another term for Minor, but usually when we talk about SCALES, not keys, generally although a few liberally tend to combine the terms, when we are talking about strict Key signatures, then the Granddaddy is Major Key's and liberal accommodation is given to the existence of "Minor" keys. But Em in a notation Key signature, doesnt exist - its 1 sharp in the F line which is known as G major.

You are splitting hairs in the "absolutely not the same" comment. Functionally speaking, you'd use the same exact notes of the scale (between the I and the vi) and resolve to different notes. But from a scale paying approach, regardless of what note you start on, the scale underneath remains the same one, notes wise.

So you are correct, but the distinction in this case is not material for how this person would play, because the ear would lead him to resolve on a stable tone of the final chord, and the final chord could be any chord, depending upon resolution.

Further more, if you are in Cm and you see that as a vi in Eb, then if you go to a Bb7 before, you'll find it wants to now resolve on Eb due to the powerful pull to resolve back to the I chord, effectively "hijacking" the song from a minor tonality to a major one, so you have to be careful that you don't use a V7 chord, however a V chord is a little easier to work with because it doesnt have the leading tone.
#7
Quote by Sean0913

You are splitting hairs in the "absolutely not the same" comment.


Nope, they're just not the same, that's why they dont have the same name

A song or modulated part in A minor is completely different from C major, so i dont get the fuzz you're making.