#1
I've contemplated learning piano, and I'm wondering if it will help me grasp music theory any. Also, some suggestions for some decent priced keyboards would be helpful.
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#2
Yes, what have you got to lose?
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#5
i've been playing piano for about 6 years now, and yes it does help, but in a different way than you are probably thinking. the keyboard allows you to visualize the notes better, and to provide a referance you can revert back to often. since you can easily see all the notes right next to each other, along with half steps and whole steps, it makes it very easy to understand music theory and how it applies to the guitar. go for it!
#6
I bought a keyboard for Christmas.

Hoping it does something, haha.
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#7
Yes it will.
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#8
If you make yourself learn theory it will. IF you do nothing but trigger synth sounds and cover yourself up with effects its not going to hurt but it wont help anything
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#9
twelve years ago, my aunt bought us a keyboard. for those twelve years, i taught myself how to play, and i played and played and played. im 19 now, and ive picked up a fantastic musical ear. i highly recommend that you learn it
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#10
Quote by TechnoLp
If you make yourself learn theory it will. IF you do nothing but trigger synth sounds and cover yourself up with effects its not going to hurt but it wont help anything



I definitely want to stay on the more classical side of music, I absolutely love Beethoven, Mozart, Bach, and the likes.
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#11
Partially yes. Piano will help you realise a lot of things musically. It's one hell of an instrument. Definately my favourite.
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#12
Quote by parigod
I definitely want to stay on the more classical side of music, I absolutely love Beethoven, Mozart, Bach, and the likes.



He's the classical equivalent of a band-wagoner.

I like um, like, Led Zeppelin, AC/DC, Metallica...chyeah.
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#13
It helps because you can see everything in a very obvious way. There's a reason that most kids whose parents want them to study music start them out on the piano.

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#14
If you take Music Theory in school, a lot of times instead of a desk, you're sat in front of a piano. The textbook uses the piano when analyzing music frequently.If you're going to major in music performance, composition, etc. it's usually in the curriculum to take a number of piano classes. It's a very practical instrument for analyzing music.
Last edited by The Madcap at Dec 7, 2009,
#15
Quote by Kevy Absolution
He's the classical equivalent of a band-wagoner.

I like um, like, Led Zeppelin, AC/DC, Metallica...chyeah.


Honestly, this.

No Wagner? Tchaikovsky? Rimsky-Korsakov?

I hate when people bandwagon, even classical music..
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Directions:
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Place it in your butt so you can't post anymore.


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#16
Quote by Kevy Absolution
He's the classical equivalent of a band-wagoner.

I like um, like, Led Zeppelin, AC/DC, Metallica...chyeah.

But unlike those bands, Mozart, Beethoven, and especially Bach retain listening values for good reasons. The classical culture is not impressed on naming the most obscure artist you know, like most rock fans like to do. With that said, it's blatantly obvious when someone is a dilettante of classical music when he claims something such as "Yea...I like Canon in D and Paginini's caprice".

Anyways, piano will help visualize harmonic motion, but truly knowing the theory still relies on your mental processing. And if you want a basic keyboard, go with M-Audio's Keystation 88es. It's cheap, basic, but has the full range. However, never think you can adequately substitute a real piano with electronic keyboards.
Last edited by Xiaoxi at Dec 7, 2009,
#17
Quote by TheBigProjekt
Honestly, this.

No Wagner? Tchaikovsky? Rimsky-Korsakov?

I hate when people bandwagon, even classical music..


I've only just gotten into it, excuse me for not knowing where to begin besides the obvious ones.
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#18
Quote by parigod
I've only just gotten into it, excuse me for not knowing where to begin besides the obvious ones.

Don't worry about them.

But listen to the advice of Johannes Brahms: "Study Bach. There, you will find everything."
#19
Quote by Xiaoxi
Don't worry about them.

But listen to the advice of Johannes Brahms: "Study Bach. There, you will find everything."


Until you hit the end of the Baroque period, and then everything changes completely.
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#21
Quote by Xiaoxi
But unlike those bands, Mozart, Beethoven, and especially Bach retain listening values for good reasons. The classical culture is not impressed on naming the most obscure artist you know, like most rock fans like to do. With that said, it's blatantly obvious when someone is a dilettante of classical music when he claims something such as "Yea...I like Canon in D and Paginini's caprice".



Thank you!


Lulz i dun lyk mozart kuz he wusnt lyk undrgrnd lyk grieg ololololol.
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#22
Quote by Kevy Absolution
Until you hit the end of the Baroque period, and then everything changes completely.

No, it doesn't. As notable 20th century musicologist Albert Schweitzer once said: Nothing comes from Bach, everything merely leads to him. If you took the time to analyze almost any given score from the common practice era after Bach, you will see that this is true.

Bach had already developed the harmonies which would be claimed by later periods. He already discovered the neapolitans, the augmented 6ths, the chromaticisms, and even bordered on atonality in a few works (see Fugue 12 from WTC1). He already established the sonata allegro form before it was called the sonata allegro. He laid the groundworks for orchestration, and voice management. Composers who followed him merely reiterate what he already did, with their own style.

Of course, Schweizter's claim is an exaggeration as atonality and avante garde started to become more prominent. However, Bach's influence is cited by almost all of the masters well after the Baroque period. Bach himself was at the end of Baroque period. He refined the style of his own era, but also set a new standard that still reaches today's music, classical/pop/jazz/you name it. You should actually study up on these things before you let your ears deceive you into thinking Tchaikovsky or Wagner or even Lady Gaga are novel compared to Bach.

And by the way, in case you didn't know, Brahms is from the romantic period.
Last edited by Xiaoxi at Dec 7, 2009,
#23
It gave me a better understanding of how everything worked together. The Piano is actually layed out in a VERY logical manner, makes things a lot easier.
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