#1
I'm customizing a strat to make it look and sound like tom delonge's strat from blink 182. i found the wiring diagram on the fender website and he has a capacitor and resistor in his guitar. my question's are: what are capacitors and resistors? what do they do? is it ok to leave them out and just wire the guitar up with a single humbucker and single volume knob? will leaving out or adding these parts make the guitar sound different? also this is my first attempt at customizing a guitar. i've never soldered in my life. is there anything i should be aware of or avoid doing so i don't damage my guitar, brand new pickup, electronic components? any suggestions or comments would help. thanx
#2
Quote by sixstringstupid
I'm customizing a strat to make it look and sound like tom delonge's strat from blink 182. i found the wiring diagram on the fender website and he has a capacitor and resistor in his guitar.

http://www.fender.com/support/diagrams/pdf_temp1/stratocaster/0138200A/SD0138200APg2.pdf
thats the diagram there, right?

Quote by sixstringstupid
my question's are: what are capacitors and resistors? what do they do?

this is a really broad question...
a resistor basically resists the current flow, and a capacitor is usually used in audio applications to filter certain frequencies.
in this case, they're there to stop the sound from getting muddy/too bassy when you turn the volume knob down.
essentially, it's just letting the high frequencies pass through, less affected by the pot than they'd usually be.

Quote by sixstringstupid
is it ok to leave them out and just wire the guitar up with a single humbucker and single volume knob?

of course. a 'standard' guitars wiring doesn't use the resistor and capacitor in there.
but keep in mind:
Quote by sixstringstupid
will leaving out or adding these parts make the guitar sound different?

it'll make a difference in sound.
like I said, it's to allow a bit more high frequencies through when you have the volume lower. so.. without them, you'll get a bassier sound with the volume rolled back.

Quote by sixstringstupid
also this is my first attempt at customizing a guitar. i've never soldered in my life. is there anything i should beaware of or avoid doing so i don't damage my guitar, brand new pickup, electronic components? any suggestions or comments would help. thanx

practice soldering on old wires/ scraps first

try to solder a wire, then desolder it. do it a few times until you're a little more comfortable with it.

it's pretty tough to damage a pickup, pot, resistor, and capacitor with a soldering iron if you're being reasonable with them..
there's some good tutorials online if you look around. the visual aids they give you'll help much more than me tryign to explain it all in words
Last edited by james4 at Dec 7, 2009,
#3
resistors resist the flow of electrons. your guitar signal is a flow of electrons. using resistors can make the current flow in certain paths or make it a smaller ammount.

capacitors store electrons in the form of a charge. with a signal that has a frequency, they discharge when the signal is lower in charge than the capacitor. it does this differently for different frequencies, so it can be used to filter low or high frequencies depending on the configuration.

thats a fairly simple explanation of the components, and a couple things they can do.


taking them out will still allow the potentiometer to work, but it will sound a bit different. namely, you will lose high end when you turn the volume down without them. for some people/styles that is a good thing. for a bright punk-y sound like older blink (ie when he was using that and not his semi-hollow) leaving them in is probably a good idea.

yes, you can damage things with a soldering iron. if you have a resistor, a capacitor, a pot, and some wire, you are most likely to damage yourself. they are robust components, so just dont do anything stupid (soldering iron in your mouth is something stupid).
#4
Quote by sixstringstupid
I'm customizing a strat to make it look and sound like tom delonge's strat from blink 182. i found the wiring diagram on the fender website and he has a capacitor and resistor in his guitar. my question's are: what are capacitors and resistors? what do they do? is it ok to leave them out and just wire the guitar up with a single humbucker and single volume knob? will leaving out or adding these parts make the guitar sound different? also this is my first attempt at customizing a guitar. i've never soldered in my life. is there anything i should be aware of or avoid doing so i don't damage my guitar, brand new pickup, electronic components? any suggestions or comments would help. thanx

Contact Mojo Tone! You need 500k knobs for the right resistance. The capacitors are debatable but don't get ceramic ones. The more capacitance the more control you have over the frequencies. Use the .005 caps. Dijon caps are good.
#5
Bro, after all, it's YOU that has to get a great tone. A good player can get a great tone out of a piece of junk. It's the Indian, never the arrow. Kurt
#6
Quote by krmoss
The more capacitance the more control you have over the frequencies.

Thats not true. Different capacitors will affect different frequencies. A higher value gives a darker tone, because more treble is 'bled' from the signal. Low values leave more treble in, so are brighter.
Quote by krmoss
Bro, after all, it's YOU that has to get a great tone. A good player can get a great tone out of a piece of junk. It's the Indian, never the arrow. Kurt

And that too is bullshit. Tone =/= technique. A good player cant get good tone out of shit gear. They will still sound like them, because they play the same way, but they will have crap tone. Tone is all gear.
#7
Mine have none. I don't use tone controls in mine. My Strats have three single coil PUs, each have an on/off switch, and a volume pot. Not a set up for everyone, but I like it. The other parts you are asking about are for tone control. As advised by others, check out the wiring sticky.
#8
Quote by littlephil
Tone is all gear.


Actually, that is the bullshit here. It's not all about having the best gear, honestly the guitar player in my band wouldn't be able to make a ****ing mesa boogie sound good mate!

To answer your original question. No, you don't need a capacitor or a resistor in your guitar. Tom delonge presumably uses the cap and the resistor to prevent the treble from bleeding off when you turn the volume down. I don't use either but if you use your volume control a lot then i think it would be worth using because they're only cheap.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
Last edited by eddiehimself at Dec 8, 2009,
#9
Quote by chokmool
The other parts you are asking about are for tone control.
In this case, not true. The resistor and capacitor here are being used to prevent treble bleed. kinda an anti-tone control if you will.
#10
Sorry, I see what you mean. I'll try to be more specific in the future, but that's why I was directing him to the wiring thread.

BTW, I'm a UT grad, and we don't really like TU either. They copied our initials and colors. I'm sure that will get me in trouble. Good luck to your team.