#1
So I have been familiar with blues style soloing for quite a while and I can rip out a blues solo in any key at will. Lately I've been getting in to metal, thought, and although most metal solos are the same damn minor pentatonic with a flat sixth and a second/flat second, they always end up sounding too bluesy and not really metal at all. I'm looking to sound more Mastodon-ish instead of Hendrixy with my solos, so are there any techniques or patterns or whatever that metal guitarists use to create that certain sound?
#2
depends on what kind of metal you are playing. But i can only reccomend you to use more gain and to learn a lot of metal songs or licks that you like. you will get used to including those licks in your playing and then you will begin creating your own.
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Last edited by ldnovelo at Dec 7, 2009,
#3
Well, I play metal and blues, and what Ive found is that the difference is the scales. In metal I use a lot of harmonic minor and phrygian dominant scales, while in blues I use pentatonics, and a whole lot of emotion.
Hope it helped you.
#4
i have the exact same problem, so i'm in the same boat as you...
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#5
Quote by SoDisCooL2
Well, I play metal and blues, and what Ive found is that the difference is the scales. In metal I use a lot of harmonic minor and phrygian dominant scales, while in blues I use pentatonics, and a whole lot of emotion.
Hope it helped you.

scales are not decisive in chosing wich style you are playing. you shouldn't fill yourself with scale names with each possible alteration, modes and such. to be able to switch between styles you should only have a proper phrasing, and this is learned by listening a lot to certain music and learning songs, or by being creative and making your own patterns
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#6
Quote by ldnovelo
scales are not decisive in chosing wich style you are playing. you shouldn't fill yourself with scale names with each possible alteration, modes and such. to be able to switch between styles you should only have a proper phrasing, and this is learned by listening a lot to certain music and learning songs, or by being creative and making your own patterns

I disagree with the statement you made, good luck playing neoclasical music with the pentatonic scale.
Some of that may be true, but it also comes down to note choice.
#7
Quote by SoDisCooL2
I disagree with the statement you made, good luck playing neoclasical music with the pentatonic scale.
Some of that may be true, but it also comes down to note choice.


That's a little stupid, since arpeggios, the most frequently used 'neoclassical' technique (as in, sweeps) are all notes taken from the pentatonic scales
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#8
Quote by rusty-knives
That's a little stupid, since arpeggios, the most frequently used 'neoclassical' technique (as in, sweeps) are all notes taken from the pentatonic scales


While i could be wrong, although the notes are taken from the pentatonic scales, are they also not taken from the major/minor(7 note) scales, from which the pentatonic is derived from? I see what you mean about sweeping being a mainly Neoclassical technique but the notes come from the major/minor scales. I could be wrong but.
#9
Contrary to popular belief, classical music wasn't all phrygian dominant in one key, but rather a major component of classical structure was modulation and sub-modulation through standard major and minor cycles - par accidentals and passing tones -, at least melodically. Theoretically speaking, neo-classical could very well be composed in a pentatonic key, so long as accidentals and modulation and cycles are used appropriately.

With that said, rhythmic phrasing, selective note choice, understanding your accompaniment and rhythm sections, using a variety of techniques for suitable for particular tonal and compositional purposes (that includes legato or fingerstyle techniques, contrasting to picking and other staccato timbres), and accenting all play a part in the soundscape (or mood/genre, however you look at it) of a solo, and any piece of music in general.

Have a listen to some of your favourite artists, and think about what they're doing - if you can find live footage, even better. Consider why they use certain notes, techniques, phrases, accenting, and so on (not just for the cool factor, but to suit the piece), and take that into consideration. I know that Lloyd, who's a brilliant guitarist on this site, made a point and acted on the strategy to try to emulate his favourite guitarists - imitating their vibrato, legato, staccato .etc. techniques, and keeping them in his vocabulary for when he wanted that particular tone - and I really would recommend hunting down the guy's page on UG and having a listen to his music to hear the result.

I'll try to post back here tomorrow with some more input - it's late, and I've probably come off as quite arrogant a few times, so I'm sorry if I have.

Best of wishes with everything, and I hope I've been at least somewhat helpful. Feel free to PM me or ask here if you have any specific questions, because I really would love to help out if I can.

Alex
Last edited by juckfush at Dec 20, 2009,
#10
Quote by rusty-knives
That's a little stupid, since arpeggios, the most frequently used 'neoclassical' technique (as in, sweeps) are all notes taken from the pentatonic scales


#11
Quote by SoDisCooL2
and a whole lot of emotion.
.


This is the real difference. Never mind what scales, blues wants emotion above everything but metal wants attack!
This may sound daft but try playing something from neither style. As it is the season, try 'Ding ding merrily on high'. Once you have the notes, try it to a metal backing (in your head is enough if you don't want to mess around recording it) See how that little melody line fits? Now try it to a blues backing. You'll have to improvise a lot because those runs are full of attack and the only emotion there is joy.
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#12
It all boils down to your approach, hit the strings harder, accent odd notes, overbend , vibrato more aggressively - you'll never pull off a convincing metal solo if you tickle the strings.
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#13
Quote by SoDisCooL2
Well, I play metal and blues, and what Ive found is that the difference is the scales. In metal I use a lot of harmonic minor and phrygian dominant scales, while in blues I use pentatonics, and a whole lot of emotion.
Hope it helped you.


And why can't you play metal solos with emotion?
#14
Don't worry about sounding like everyone else. If you really want a more metal-esque solo, turn up the gain, use the bridge pickup for more attack, and go for it at full speed. Little known fact (that's sarcasm), but Kirk Hammett from that little band called Metallica has used the minor pentatonic for every solo he's ever done. It seems to have worked out just fine for him, if you know what I mean.
#15
Quote by redfin
So I have been familiar with blues style soloing for quite a while and I can rip out a blues solo in any key at will. Lately I've been getting in to metal, thought, and although most metal solos are the same damn minor pentatonic with a flat sixth and a second/flat second, they always end up sounding too bluesy and not really metal at all. I'm looking to sound more Mastodon-ish instead of Hendrixy with my solos, so are there any techniques or patterns or whatever that metal guitarists use to create that certain sound?


Dude... Mastodon solos are pretty damn bluesy, if you can't make the jump from blues to Mastodon in terms of soloing I'd suggest looking at two things:

1 - More Mastodon solos. Look at the closely, break them apart and analyze them, not only in terms of note choice but phrasing, attack, tone and all the other things that make up how something is played. Once you understand those things you can apply them to your own solos.

2 - The backing you're soloing over. A solo is never going to sound metal-y without soloing over an appropriately 'metal' backing and nothing will ever sound like Mastodon unless you're soloing over something that sounds like them.

Ignore anyone who says anything about scales making the sound of solo - they don't, the main thing (and by this I mean the most important aspect BAR NONE) is phrasing. With the right phrasing you can make a minor pentatonic sound like anything from blues to funk to metal to jazz, you just need to approach it in the right way.
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