#1
i feel like i've hit a dead end in theory now, because i've learnt all the basics like major and minor scales, the pentatonics and all the modes and their formulas....i'v got intervals and inversions down to..

but now im not sure where to go from here, i guess im asking whats next in theory coz i dnt really know what else there is to learn, although im certain there's plenty more....

any one give me ideas??
36 Crazyfists
Trivium
Machine Head
August Burns Red

And I like my penis. Because of it's existence, every morning I can look past the man thongs, pink duvet cover and a-Ha CDs and say to myself, "You're a man."


#2
Do you understand how the Major scale is constructed in terms of steps/intervals./notes? Do you understand how the other scales you know are related to the Major scale? Can you harmonise the Major scale by stacking thirds? Do you know the notes of your neck?

Edit: Can you use what you've learnt so far?
Last edited by zhilla at Dec 8, 2009,
#4
Quote by zhilla
Do you understand how the Major scale is constructed in terms of steps/intervals./notes? Do you understand how the other scales you know are related to the Major scale? Can you harmonise the Major scale by stacking thirds? Do you know the notes of your neck?


^this + putting what you've learnt into practice. So you've learnt some scales, but do you know how to use them? You've got a list of intervals in your head, but how does each one sound? etc. etc.

Remember that theory isn't something to box in a musician, it's just there to describe whatever the musican does. If you do something, or come across something somebody else has done, but can't describe it with your knowledge of theory; there is your next step.
#5
i know how to build chords and scales with intervals etc and the relationships between major and minor etc. i can take a major scale and then play it in each mode by flatting certain intervals, i dont know what to do next though.....and yeah i can see the notes on the neck and play these scales in more than one place....
36 Crazyfists
Trivium
Machine Head
August Burns Red

And I like my penis. Because of it's existence, every morning I can look past the man thongs, pink duvet cover and a-Ha CDs and say to myself, "You're a man."


#6
Can you use them all? Like - can you write with them, or improvise with them? Can you see a chord prog and work out what scales you could use over it?

Happy with modal chord progressions? Non diatonic progressions? Harmonic and melodic minor?

Have you gone through the music theory FAQ to see if there is anything in there you haven't covered that looks interesting?

#7
Quote by P-H-O-B-I-A
i know how to build chords and scales with intervals etc and the relationships between major and minor etc. i can take a major scale and then play it in each mode by flatting certain intervals, i dont know what to do next though.....and yeah i can see the notes on the neck and play these scales in more than one place....

Try getting a book, or taking lessons or a class.
shred is gaudy music
#8
This may not help, but try composing your own songs. See what problems you run into, and figure out how to solve them. I may not understand what you are after, but applying what you have learned, can lead to a new path. You may already be writing, I don't know, but if you aren't, give it a try.
#9
Quote by chokmool
This may not help, but try composing your own songs. See what problems you run into, and figure out how to solve them. I may not understand what you are after, but applying what you have learned, can lead to a new path. You may already be writing, I don't know, but if you aren't, give it a try.

This. Currently I'm writing my own songs and on this one I have had a few problems working out things and by overcoming them I have opened up a new door into theory.
Quote by Tyler Durden
It's only after we've lost everything that we're free to do anything.

Erowid
#10
Consider things like Counter Point. A lot of my students who graduate go on to become inspired by composing, looking at difficult pieces like Modo Perpetual, or just about anything.

It sounds to me, and I might be wrong, but the study and intellectual assention of theory might be there, but the practical understanding on how to use it may not be? This is something that I have observed for years among many guitarists. I have even heard it said that Modal progressions are really progressions at all, but mostly chordal vamps. To me this is endemic of the misunderstanding that many people perpetuate and have concerning the modes.

In my online course I travel very extensively in this area, and demystify these areas.

But I would need to see an example of a composition, chord wise, to better determine if this is the case with you. Could you compose something in C Lydian - that every chord is at least a 4 part harmony? Triads aren't that difficult, but its getting into the other chords where ones knowledge can start to be revealed.
#11
Quote by P-H-O-B-I-A
i feel like i've hit a dead end in theory now, because i've learnt all the basics like major and minor scales, the pentatonics and all the modes and their formulas....i'v got intervals and inversions down to..

but now im not sure where to go from here, i guess im asking whats next in theory coz i dnt really know what else there is to learn, although im certain there's plenty more....

any one give me ideas??


put what you know into practice and start composing your own tunes with four-part writing.

also, what you can do for fun is get some old Bach music or something, and start analyzing it with figured bass. That's always fun.
Quote by steven seagull
There are no boring scales, just boring guitarists.

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dude calebrocker, that first song on your list almost made me cry
11/10
you win my good sir

^ My For Mom cover

Check out my MP3s!!
Last edited by calebrocker at Dec 8, 2009,