#1
I couldnt find this thread, so I decided to start it.

Anyway, have anyone here archived their middle voice?
If you don't know what middle voice I am talking about, its the voice between chest voice and head voice. Its like a perfect combination of those two voices, and does function like a "bridge" for going from chest voice to head voice or the opposite. What happens is that there is a process called "dampening" that closes off about halfway of your vocal chords.
For men, it starts approximately at the E/F1 to B1, and for women approx. B1 to F2.

So, if there is someone spectacular singers out there somewhere in UG, do you have any advice for me about how to find it, or how to improve the "power" of it?

One day you`re gonna wake up and you`ll be 30 years old and you won`t have done a damn thing with your life.
#2
"Passagio".

That's the term to describe what you're talking about, at least in classical terminology. Honestly, the best thing you can do is to make sure you're using proper technique, and to practice. A powerful passagio does not happen overnight. There's no real shortcuts to it.

By the way, I believe you meant F4 to B4 and B4 to F5. I've never met a woman in my life that could even hit B1, let alone consider it part of her passagio.
My guitar modification blog.
Quote by MuffinMan
Jesus was all like "To those about to rock, I salute you." then he grabbed his mighty axe and rocked the Romans out really hard. Of course they were strict classical music so....
#3
I don't know if the piano notes was said the same way as the Norwegian.
C1 for me is the middle C, C2 is the octave over etc.
Just a tiny c is the octave below the middle C and a simply C is the octave below that.

So basically I meant the one in the middle C's octave.
But Passaggio sound like it, even though I can find information about the "middle voice", so i really dont know if its the same.

One day you`re gonna wake up and you`ll be 30 years old and you won`t have done a damn thing with your life.
#5
Quote by keven93
I don't know if the piano notes was said the same way as the Norwegian.
C1 for me is the middle C, C2 is the octave over etc.
Just a tiny c is the octave below the middle C and a simply C is the octave below that.

So basically I meant the one in the middle C's octave.
But Passaggio sound like it, even though I can find information about the "middle voice", so i really dont know if its the same.


Different areas shouldn't matter, but I guess it could. I learned middle C as C4.

Regardless of terminology, I'm sure it's the same thing. Many forms of vocal study use different terminology. This is the reason there is so much debate on these forums as to what falsetto is. What you're describing as "head voice", I would call "falsetto". If you were to ask some people here, they would call what you're referring to "mixed voice" or "middle voice", like you did.

The only real advice I can give you other than what I said before is to make sure you support your notes very well. Use your diaphragm, and use more air as you go up. Also, I have heard it is not a bad thing to tighten your throat a little bit as you go up, though that is something I disagree with my vocal coach on, simply because it's too easy to do damage by tightening your throat.
My guitar modification blog.
Quote by MuffinMan
Jesus was all like "To those about to rock, I salute you." then he grabbed his mighty axe and rocked the Romans out really hard. Of course they were strict classical music so....
#6
Quote by Black Star
Different areas shouldn't matter, but I guess it could. I learned middle C as C4.

Regardless of terminology, I'm sure it's the same thing. Many forms of vocal study use different terminology. This is the reason there is so much debate on these forums as to what falsetto is. What you're describing as "head voice", I would call "falsetto". If you were to ask some people here, they would call what you're referring to "mixed voice" or "middle voice", like you did.

The only real advice I can give you other than what I said before is to make sure you support your notes very well. Use your diaphragm, and use more air as you go up. Also, I have heard it is not a bad thing to tighten your throat a little bit as you go up, though that is something I disagree with my vocal coach on, simply because it's too easy to do damage by tightening your throat.


I would disagree with part of this. Using more air as you go up would be necessary if you're pulling your chest voice into higher notes, but that's going to sound more shouty than anything; you'll never get over your passagio that way. I'm not sure about in a classical context, but in a rock context, this is so.

I find it simpler to think of the voice as one voice, rather than different voices and registers. If you think that way, it going to cause you to do unnatural stuff to get over bridges and switch registers and adduct your cords, and all that good stuff. If you're singing in a way that requires you do profoundly different things as you sing different notes, you're singing incorrectly, or rather, inefficiently.
#7
I'm going to assume that you are using the term "head voice" to describe notes produced in the upper register, and that you are NOT using it to describe falsetto.

I agree entirely with Chaingarden here:

I find it simpler to think of the voice as one voice, rather than different voices and registers. If you think that way, it going to cause you to do unnatural stuff to get over bridges and switch registers...


The analogy I often use is to compare "chest voice" to the woofer of a speaker and "head voice" to the tweeter. Each on their own sounds awful, and in fact, the two really necessarily work together to produce the proper tone. In that respect, I find those terms to be a little misleading, as they suggest that they can be used exclusive of each other, which they can't really.

In other words, you will always be singing in what people often describe as 'mixed voice.'

Although, even though the voice is produced the same across the registers, typically you will aim low notes and high notes in different places. Higher notes will be produced wide and across the cheekbones, whereas low notes will be focused very narrowly and just in front of the bottom teeth.

To develop a consistency of tone across the registers, it does mean that the voice will be produced in the same way, regardless of pitch. It also means that they will be focused in the right place. If you do not focus the voice in the right place, your pitch and tone become blurry and unstable.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.