#1
So, I've been playing a few different instruments lately- Piano, Guitar and Drums a bit and really loved learning different songs on each instrument, and I'm talking about themes for tv shows or games or wonderwall on guitar- So very easy stuff.

But after I learned a few things I easily get bored with it- And I think it's because neither instruments really interest me.

But I heard a few bass heavy songs, and really liked the sound of the bass and wanted to give it a try but don't wanna waste money if it's the same as playing a guitar.

So as you can hear i'm very newbish and not very familiar with stuff
But I really would like some advice on how the bass is different from the guitar in playing style- Since I've been asking a few people but they mostly say that Bass is more rhytm based while guitar is 'less'.

Advice greatly appreciated!!
#2
As far as I know, a basses strings play lower tones, hence giving the sound more bass.

As for the setup differences, i'm still learning that myself.
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#3
it really depends on the genre, if you want to get into Jazz Fuzion or something like that, bass is one of the most stand out instruments, often playing leads and solos. I'm not a bassplayer, however I do own a few bass guitars and have a go of occasion. It's fun to just jam with, and when you're first starting out, you can join a band or have a jam with some friends without worrying about stuff being to hard. Generally the basic basslines are simple as all hell, it's just what you add to it, such as different picking style, pulloffs/hammerons, octave shifts etc.

If you've got some time to spend playing bass, go for it.
#4
Bass is different then guitar in that its a completely different instrument. Bass holds down the groove. Its the glue between the drums and the guitar, it supplies the low end and gives depth and feeling to the music. Its whatever instrument you make it, you can take the lead and solo with a bass, or just hold down a basic rhythm.
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#5
Thank you for the quick answers!

what Tostitos is talking about is what I wanna hear about, Ino the instrument is very different- But what I learned from a guitar is that you need to be very precise with your fingers etc. while on bass it's more about strength in them?
Last edited by sienko at Dec 8, 2009,
#6
Not so much although strength helps. Just goes on how you play. Like the guys said you can play easy rock beats or some nice flowing jazz. Finger strength just comes to it, its just how you play it that matters.
#7
Quote by sienko
Thank you for the quick answers!

what Tostitos is talking about is what I wanna hear about, Ino the instrument is very different- But what I learned from a guitar is that you need to be very precise with your fingers etc. while on bass it's more about strength in them?

bass is so severely different from guitar that im surprised we call them bass guitars.the techniques are different because galloping becomes harder and you have to do slaps and pops. the frets and strings are bigger so u have to press down really hard and try not to suck. this rule is especially important in jazzy songs because its loud and every one can hear u **** up. theyre heavier and the frets are bigger but you still have to be precise.
#8
Quote by sienko
Thank you for the quick answers!

what Tostitos is talking about is what I wanna hear about, Ino the instrument is very different- But what I learned from a guitar is that you need to be very precise with your fingers etc. while on bass it's more about strength in them?


That's not the major issue, the major issue for beginning and intermediate players is tightness. You have to be much more stable rhythmically to play bass. A lot of folks new to music think bass is easy because they can't quite grasp this, but the truth is the dynamics and timing behind bass playing are very different, and initially more difficult than on guitar.

If you're pounding out a simple line of 16th notes on the root, for example, a decent guitar player will naturally emphasis certain notes more than others, but even a beginning bass player really needs to drive home the difference in stress on different counts, the one and three of the measure are going to be emphasized, the three is going to be slightly less emphasized than the one, the number like "1" of each count (1 e & a) and the "&" are going to be similarly emphasized. IF the bass player wants to create a different feel, all he has to do is deviate a little from this standard approach and the whole song's rhythm changes--the bass player is actively involved in reminding every body what's going on with the rhythm.

It seems like a lot to consider for a simple bass line because there really is a lot going on, and ignorance about this is the reason a lot of new bands where someone just picked up the bass to fill a slot sound like absolute crap, the band isn't tight all because of a poor bass player.

That's a pretty basic example, and there's plenty more to expand upon, but I think it drives home the mentality that separates pop and rock bass playing from guitar playing.
Last edited by dullsilver_mike at Dec 11, 2009,
#9
Wow, after reading the last couple of posts, i've become quite discouraged from playing bass ha
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#10
^ don't be discouraged, talking about everything that goes into bass can sound overwhelming sometimes, but you'll get it down yourself eventually. Even if it takes you years and years to understand the aspects of bass, thats normal, we're all still learning.
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#11
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Wow, after reading the last couple of posts, i've become quite discouraged from playing bass ha



Quote by Tostitos
^ don't be discouraged, talking about everything that goes into bass can sound overwhelming sometimes, but you'll get it down yourself eventually. Even if it takes you years and years to understand the aspects of bass, thats normal, we're all still learning.

+1


No reason to be discouraged, I was simply pointing out that the techniques a beginning bass player develops tend to require more subtlety than those a beginning guitar player develops. They are issues you'll have to address with any instrument as you develop, they're just more pronounced in bass early on.

Also, note that most rhythmic skills can be developed naturally without consciously focusing on them. If you play bass, you'll have to spend a fair amount of time learning to count properly, but the intricacies of rhythmic phrasing beyond that will develop on their own as anyone with a good ear continues to play.

When you get some experience, you'll naturally play implied staccato notes or add a little swing to places that call for it, and a million other such things simply because you've spent a lot of time playing music. I'm just saying that the absence of these things is more noticeable on bass than on guitar.

It's all about different skill sets, one instrument isn't necessarily harder than another, they just require different approaches. If the careful attention to dynamics and rhythm is the kind of approach that interests you most, bass can be right up your alley. If you're more interested in creating chordal music, for example, you'll knock that out early on as a guitar player, but wouldn't likely think about it much until you're an intermediate to advanced bass player.
Last edited by dullsilver_mike at Dec 14, 2009,