#1
So ive been playing three years, self taught (well, except for a teacher for like a month who was not good) I have good technique, i know scales and i can solo in key.

So i have a question...... What are these mode things i keep hearing about? I tried looking into them, but its so complicated. Can i get a realllly basic answer of what a mode is? thanks.
#2
modes is easiest explained as playing the same notes as in a parent scale but in different intervals. its how you use it that makes the difference, at first it seems just kinda like soling in key... but once you get used to using proper phrasing you can get sum really good sounds.


C,D,E,F,G,A,B - C ionian
D,E,F,G,A,B,C - D dorian

start there and experiment with how they sound different? thats my best advice I'm sure someone else can explain it better but i tried
#3
i'm not really sure what you mean with modes 'cause i speak spanish but, is something like modulation or maybe do you know another name for it??
#4
Quote by kapman2489
modes is easiest explained as playing the same notes as in a parent scale but in different intervals. its how you use it that makes the difference, at first it seems just kinda like soling in key... but once you get used to using proper phrasing you can get sum really good sounds.


C,D,E,F,G,A,B - C ionian
D,E,F,G,A,B,C - D dorian

start there and experiment with how they sound different? thats my best advice I'm sure someone else can explain it better but i tried


So a mode is a variation of a scale?

So i have to memorize all of these variations?
#5
well theres 7 different scale modes, and once you memorize the patterns you can apply that to any key. but start with the first 2 modes so you get a feel of what the difference is. It took me a long time to get the concept of it but it'll come to you if you listen to the differences. Its easy to start with F because of how its laid out on the neck

F ionian
e ------------------------------------3-5-6
b -----------------------------3-5-6
g ----------------------2-3-5
d ---------------2-3-5
a --------1-3-5
e -1-3-5

G Dorian

e ------------------------------------5-6-8
b -----------------------------5-6-8
g ----------------------3-5-7
d ---------------3-5-7
a --------3-5-7
e -3-5-6


sorry about the shitty tab i got lazy
#6
Quote by kapman2489
well theres 7 different scale modes, and once you memorize the patterns you can apply that to any key. but start with the first 2 modes so you get a feel of what the difference is. It took me a long time to get the concept of it but it'll come to you if you listen to the differences. Its easy to start with F because of how its laid out on the neck

F ionian
e ------------------------------------3-5-6
b -----------------------------3-5-6
g ----------------------2-3-5
d ---------------2-3-5
a --------1-3-5
e -1-3-5

G Dorian

e ------------------------------------5-6-8
b -----------------------------5-6-8
g ----------------------3-5-7
d ---------------3-5-7
a --------3-5-7
e -3-5-6


sorry about the shitty tab i got lazy



Whats the name of the rest of them? Ill memorize them myself
GEARNESS!
Gibson SG Angus Young Signature
Line 6 Spider Valve Mk1
Dunlop Eric Johnson Jazz III

THE ULTIMATE COMBINATION
#7
ionian - major scale
dorian - minor scale
phrygian - minor scale
lydian - major scale
mixolydian - dominant
aeolian - minor scale
locrian - half dim

I Dont Play Like My Aunt Lucy
Last edited by motoko at Dec 8, 2009,
#8
Quote by motoko
ionian
dorian
phrygian
lydian
mixolydian
aeolian
locrian

I Dont Play Like My Aunt Lucy



Is there one of those fore every key?
GEARNESS!
Gibson SG Angus Young Signature
Line 6 Spider Valve Mk1
Dunlop Eric Johnson Jazz III

THE ULTIMATE COMBINATION
#10
and they are always arranged in that order

so if you took G Major, the last note (F#) would be locrian
#11
damn. thanks for the help anyway guys, i think ill go keep practicing the drums.......

lol jk, i guess ill.... uhh..... memorize every mode for every key... you do that how?
GEARNESS!
Gibson SG Angus Young Signature
Line 6 Spider Valve Mk1
Dunlop Eric Johnson Jazz III

THE ULTIMATE COMBINATION
#12
Well you don't really have to memorize every mode in every key but you are missing the fundamental theory behind modes. Once you learn about the major scale, you'll see that you don't really need to memorize all that much. Also, learn about intervals and writing scales numerically in parallel to the major scale ex. natural minor scale 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7.

The theory faq is stickied at the top of this forum and is pretty useful, it's really not sitting there for no reason at all.
#13
Modes are scales. They are derived from making a different note, than the one usually the tonic when that set of notes is being played, the tonic. In order to do this, one must structure their progression in a specific way to achieve that resolution. This results in simple one or two chord vamps.

The important thing to realize about modes is what their interval patterns are. It doesn't really matter which other modes share the same key signature. For example:
C Ionian = C D E F G A B
C Lydian = C D E F♯ G A B
This is the important way of differentiating modes. They are called parallel modes.

Most people who don't understand modes fully are only thinking about relative modes:
C Ionian = C D E F G A B
F Lydian = F G A B C D E
This relationship, while interesting doesn't really help you in anything, other than remembering that fingering patterns for the two modes are the same.

When you learn about relative modes, you'll find what the "flavour tones" (notes that make that modes sound unique) of each mode are and actually get a feel for it.
#15
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php? t=1042392

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/the_guide_to/ the_ultimate_guide_to_guitar_chapter_iv_1_scales_-_diatonic_ modes_in_theory.html

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/the_guide_t o/the_ultimate_guide_to_guitar_chapter_iv_2_scales_-_diatoni c_modes_in_practice.html

Have a read of these. I suggest you make sure you understand (at least) the major scale, intervals and chord construction.

The problem with these threads is that you get a lot of information. Some wrong, some right. Sifting through it all to get the correct information takes time, so go an have a look at those articles and:

Quote by isaac_bandits
Modes are scales. They are derived from making a different note, than the one usually the tonic when that set of notes is being played, the tonic. In order to do this, one must structure their progression in a specific way to achieve that resolution. This results in simple one or two chord vamps.

The important thing to realize about modes is what their interval patterns are. It doesn't really matter which other modes share the same key signature. For example:
C Ionian = C D E F G A B
C Lydian = C D E F♯ G A B
This is the important way of differentiating modes. They are called parallel modes.

Most people who don't understand modes fully are only thinking about relative modes:
C Ionian = C D E F G A B
F Lydian = F G A B C D E
This relationship, while interesting doesn't really help you in anything, other than remembering that fingering patterns for the two modes are the same.

When you learn about relative modes, you'll find what the "flavour tones" (notes that make that modes sound unique) of each mode are and actually get a feel for it.


is a pretty good introduction\overview
#16
Quote by SGT_Fatbody
So ive been playing three years, self taught (well, except for a teacher for like a month who was not good) I have good technique, i know scales and i can solo in key.

So i have a question...... What are these mode things i keep hearing about? I tried looking into them, but its so complicated. Can i get a realllly basic answer of what a mode is? thanks.


Think of ice creams:

Major are Vanilla

Minor are Chocolate.

Modes are all the other flavors which make it so we have more than vanilla or chocolate to choose from.
#17
Quote by SGT_Fatbody
damn. thanks for the help anyway guys, i think ill go keep practicing the drums.......

lol jk, i guess ill.... uhh..... memorize every mode for every key... you do that how?


I teach the modes in my online course, check out my seminar link below to learn more.
#18
I'd make sure you understand the major scale before worrying about modes - so you know how its constructed in terms of steps (WWHWWWH), intervals (root, maj 2nd, maj 3rd, perf 4th etc) and notes (eg G Maj = G A B C D E F#), and can harmonise the scale by stacking 3rds. Then look at how the minor scale is related to the major scale. If you understand that, then modes should be pretty easy. If you don't understand that, then modes will be a pig to get your head around.
#19
try to stay away from just "memorizing scales" it makes your solos sound very scaley, if you know what i mean. Learn to play them up the neck and in every different place possible. Thats the only reason that I posted just the dorian scale cuz when looking at it all at once you tend to just try and memorize things, and your playing has no feel
#20
Quote by zhilla
I'd make sure you understand the major scale before worrying about modes - so you know how its constructed in terms of steps (WWHWWWH), intervals (root, maj 2nd, maj 3rd, perf 4th etc) and notes (eg G Maj = G A B C D E F#), and can harmonise the scale by stacking 3rds. Then look at how the minor scale is related to the major scale. If you understand that, then modes should be pretty easy. If you don't understand that, then modes will be a pig to get your head around.


what he said
#21
I agree with the statement about knowing Major scales, but Ill even add to that.

1. Know the musical Alphabet - Naturals and enharmonics and how the notes are all spelled out chromatically - I teach this in my online academy

2. Know the difference note name wise between whole and half steps - I teach this as part of my online academy.

3. Know triads and all the notes in every single one (advanced and from how Ive seen it taught...very hard) I teach this in my online academy - my method is very clean and progressive once Ive equipped you with what you need beforehand.

3a. The reason you have to know triads and such is, how are you going to use the modes, if once you've learned these abstract scale shapes and patterns, you start playing them and they sound awful? This is the flip side of modes, and very important unless you want to put all that work just to play over 2 chords.

Check out my seminar below in that link, and if I can answer any questions, let me know.
#22
Quote by Sean0913
Think of ice creams:

Major are Vanilla

Minor are Chocolate.

Modes are all the other flavors which make it so we have more than vanilla or chocolate to choose from.


Thanks, now i understand what they are for.
GEARNESS!
Gibson SG Angus Young Signature
Line 6 Spider Valve Mk1
Dunlop Eric Johnson Jazz III

THE ULTIMATE COMBINATION
#23
Quote by SGT_Fatbody
Thanks, now i understand what they are for.



Now the thing to keep in mind so you dont go learning scales, is you have to know how to use them. Because a Mode will only sound like a mode if the right chords are underneath it.

So, knowledge is really important to understand, how to identify the modes and the chords which can be built from them. The chords are very important, unless you plan on soloing over a drone note that never changes...which is fun for a while, but eventually it can become boring.

In my online lesson program I thoroughly cover all that you need to know to learn modes and to play them everywhere and how to compose in them. If interested check out my seminar which starts in the link in my signature below - theres one section where I go over the subject of modes in a lot of detail.

Best,

Sean