#1
Well I searched best I could and couldn't find something that relates to my exact situation. I live in Western Washington and though it doesn't get as cold here as other areas right now it is still below freezing (around 28 degrees). My band practices out in an unheated garage. We are worried about our gear out there. I'm aware of the problems with guitars but it is more the amps, drums and other electronics I am worried about. Is it better to leave my 5150 out in the garage all the time, or should I take it into the house after letting the tubes cool down after practice? What would the procedure be for playing a tube amp that was in the house out in the cold garage? Most posts seem to revolve around the opposite of this situation, from a cold trunk to a warm gig etc. I'm dealing with from a warm house, out into a colder garage. Keep in mind the temperatures are cold but not extreme.
Stuff I use:

Schecter C-1 Classic
Ibanez RG350DX
Peavey 5150 (Signature)
Marshall 1960AV
#2
Hmmm, I have no clue...My band just practices inside our bass player's house....Perhaps you could do something similar?
#3
As of right now, indoor practice is not an option.
Stuff I use:

Schecter C-1 Classic
Ibanez RG350DX
Peavey 5150 (Signature)
Marshall 1960AV
#5
Well as a long term suggestion, get the garage insulated. Insulation does wonders, i have it and when you come home on a cold day it feels like someone turned on a heater at just the right temperature a half hour before you arrived.
Chelsea FC



Quote by Blues Hippie
As for the swim team member that drowned, it just means the swim team just got a lot better. Same with him too, it's time to move on, the weakest link is gone...
#6
you should just leave it on stanby a bit longer, no need to carry it home after every practice. Whats bad for you amp is an instant change in temperature, but since you have a tube amp that doesnt get warm directly, you just have to heat it up properly and it will cool down automaticly if you turn it off (sorry for bad spelling).
#7
until then, take your amp out to the garage early and let it adapt to the temp before turning it on. also let it warm on standby longer than normal. some people say 30 seconds is normal... without trying to spark a debate, 15 minutes is, under normal conditions, optimal. in your case, aim for twenty atleast.

yes, that means you have to show up early.

follow the same procedure in reverse when practice is over... turn it off, wait while it cools, then you're good to go.
#8
Practiced for years in an unheated/uncooled/un-insulated garage year-round in Chicago.
All tube amps, never had a single problem.

Leave it on stand-by a while, keep the stringed instruments inside.

Our drummer found he had to tune his heads up more frequently, but that was the only issue.
No need to bring the amps in.
#9
yeah, common misconception about amps is they don't like the cold. truth is, amps prefrm better in cold dry climates.

rutch, good point about the instruments. what we always did was to take 'em outside, but leave them in their cases while they adapt. that way they don't get hit with the sudden cold without support from the case.
#10
Best example that I can use for this is when Maiden toured in a van before they became famous. They would leave their gear in the van during the winter when it was well below freezing temperatures.

You just need to allow your amp to warm up a bit longer.


Grisky - not trying to start a debate or anything but normally standby time varies from amp to amp based on what the company recommends as a proper amount of time.
#11
fine for the amp as long as you warm them up longer.

Guitars are a no-no. Extreme temperatures + guitar can = major neck warpage.
Jackson RR5 ivory w/ EMG 81/85
Jackson DX6 w/ SD Distortion & Dimarzio Super Distortion
Fender Starcaster Sunburst
Mesa/Boogie DC-3
Johnson JT50 Mirage
Ibanez TS-9
Morley Bad Horsie 2
Boss CE-5

ISP Decimator
Boss DD-6
Korg Pitchblack
#12
alright so in summary its basically rapid changes in temperature that are to be avoided. I can leave the amp out there but just make sure to warm it up in standby for longer than normal. My follow up question is what about condensation? As long as I follow these guidelines do I have to worry about condensation?
Stuff I use:

Schecter C-1 Classic
Ibanez RG350DX
Peavey 5150 (Signature)
Marshall 1960AV
#13
Quote by Kingofold
alright so in summary its basically rapid changes in temperature that are to be avoided. I can leave the amp out there but just make sure to warm it up in standby for longer than normal. My follow up question is what about condensation? As long as I follow these guidelines do I have to worry about condensation?


This can be a problem. You wanna store your amp in a dry place. If there is moisture in the amp and it freezes then you may have some problems. Maybe have something to store your head in or wrap it up with just to help limit moisture as much as you can.
#14
im still thinking that it would be easier and not such a gamble with your equipment to just heat your garage using a salamander or a torpedo
#15
Quote by i_am_metalhead
Grisky - not trying to start a debate or anything but normally standby time varies from amp to amp based on what the company recommends as a proper amount of time.


true, but better to error on the side of caution. 15min is def on the longer end of that spectrum (and if I remember correctly, it's the longEST I've seen... from Diamond I believe).