#1
OK, my room is too dry. I can't do much about it, there's no source of heating apart from a radiator putting out dry air, so I HAVE to have it on if I don't want to freeze. And even opening the window doesn't do much (it's a university room and the window opens maybe an inch)

My humidity levels sit around 30-40 percent usually. I don't know about my guitars, but I'm definitely uncomfortable even with contact lenses, they feel dry all the time.

So how do you humidify your room on the cheap? I don't want to splash out on an expensive humidifiers, what are some cheap ways to increase humidity in a poorly ventilated room?

I was thinking about building my own humidifier on the cheap like so:
http://www.instructables.com/id/Evaporative-Humidifier/

But Idk if it'll help.
#2
Fill a five-gallon bucket up with water and place it somewhere safe in your room?
#4
Quote by DonJulio
hang damp or wet towels over your radiator


Well, beats my idea!
#5
#6
#7
Click the link in my sig. It should explain a lot. A bucket of water won't do anything.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#8
Quote by captivate
Click the link in my sig. It should explain a lot. A bucket of water won't do anything.


Thanks, I already read it and re-read it. Unfortunately, It didn't tell me anything new that's useful. The sound hole humidifier idea is very good, but like I said, it's a problem with the whole room. And it's a problem with my contact lenses as well. Thank you anyway though
#9
Quote by captivate
Click the link in my sig. It should explain a lot. A bucket of water won't do anything.


If properly heated, the water in the bucket will evaporate. How well it humidifies though is up to the flow of the air, leaks and cracks in windows and walls, etc.
#10
^ True, but you can't accurately determine how much you need to heat it to get the room up to x amount of humidity.

Quote by LordBishek
Thanks, I already read it and re-read it. Unfortunately, It didn't tell me anything new that's useful. The sound hole humidifier idea is very good, but like I said, it's a problem with the whole room. And it's a problem with my contact lenses as well. Thank you anyway though


Is there any reason you can't humidify each guitar one by one? Or do you have that many?
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#11
Quote by DonJulio
hang damp or wet towels over your radiator

Please don't do this. When they dry out, you'll set your dorm on fire.

My experience is that once the guitar has acclimated to the new humidity level, it doesn't do a damn thing. It's the shifting back and forth from one environment to the other that causes problems. I would just leave it in its case.
Last edited by GC Shred Off at Dec 9, 2009,
#12
Quote by captivate
^ True, but you can't accurately determine how much you need to heat it to get the room up to x amount of humidity.


Is there any reason you can't humidify each guitar one by one? Or do you have that many?


No no, I have two - I'm going to try the soundhole humidifier idea your post linked to, but I'm just wondering if there's a solution that raises the comfort level of the entire room at the same time.