#5
Quote by griffRG7321
Rubbish.

It's not a chord it's a interval of a tritone (diminished 5th/augmented 4th)

Cool. Mind if you simplify that for me a bit? Just I dont understand what that means
#6
That's as simple as it can be explained without somebody also explaining basic music theory to you.

It's not a chord because there's only two notes.
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#7
I know basic theory, just nto tritones etc. And it can be a chord can't it? Or is a diad not a chord?
#8
Quote by Lollage123
Or is a diad not a chord?


that's correct. it'd just be a diad, which are normally named by the interval that they form. in this case it's a tritone (can also be called an augmented 4th or diminished 5th)

an interval is the distance between two notes, and they all have names (some of which will be enharmonic to each other). in this case it's a distance of 6 half steps which is called a tritone, augmented 4th, or diminished 5th depending on usage. tritone is the sort of all around name for it regardless of context.
#9
its a double stop - you have the notes of a diad.

looking at those notes though you have a G and a C#/Db

It is in fact a tritone - one possibility I see, is an Eb7 suggested Eb G Bb Db

A tritone is also known as the interval of a b5 - in blues we call it the blues note or blue note. It was also known as the Devils Interval hundreds of years ago Diablous Musicas (or something like that).

If you take any note and go 1 whole step, another whole step and a final whole step from there you end up at the tritone of the note you started on

So in G, you have G to A (first whole step) A to B (second whole step) and B to C#/Db (third *tri* step)

Hope this helps - if youd like to learn music theory and self sufficiency on the guitar, in a very easy to understand, and quickly, and this explanation helps, please check out my video link below and let me know if you have any questions.
Last edited by Sean0913 at Dec 9, 2009,
#10
Quote by The4thHorsemen
that's correct. it'd just be a diad, which are normally named by the interval that they form. in this case it's a tritone (can also be called an augmented 4th or diminished 5th)

an interval is the distance between two notes, and they all have names (some of which will be enharmonic to each other). in this case it's a distance of 6 half steps which is called a tritone, augmented 4th, or diminished 5th depending on usage. tritone is the sort of all around name for it regardless of context.

Makes sense.
Note to self: I need toread that bloody crusade article, I wanna be like you gurus! All knowimng and powerful in the ways of theory..
#11
Quote by Lollage123
Makes sense.
Note to self: I need toread that bloody crusade article, I wanna be like you gurus! All knowimng and powerful in the ways of theory..



lol I learned all my theory from articles on UG and this forum. you're in the right place.


and the crusades article is good, but when it gets in modes it can be a little misleading. I think it may have contributed to some of the misunderstanding about modes. But the rest of the crusades is good, just take what he says about modes with a grain of salt.


edit: sean, it was called Diabolus in Musica, meaning "The devil in music" because it was so dissonant that it had to be the devil's interval. it was widely avoided, and there are claims that people were excommunicated for using it, but there's no evidence of it.
Last edited by The4thHorsemen at Dec 9, 2009,
#12
I looked at your lesson, and the one observation that I see in it and the way a lot of people teach it, is the use of non symmetrcal fingering numbers, some strings have 2 notes some 3. To me this adds a degree of memorization that makes it harder to do, than if every note were three per string as I teach. This allows for all that you have plus fluid legato runs using three notes per string. Nothing novel about 3 notes per string approach but I just think its easier to accomodate rather than having some with 2 notes and some with 3, when you onsider the intervals are all the same.

And you are right about the term for the tritone, and thats why I hedged that name with "I think"