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#1
Hey guys, I've been self teaching guitar for 10 months now. Been making great progress, everyone around me says that I'm talented (I just think I practise a lot - at least 2 hours daily). I can mess around on the guitar quite nicely, yet I lack one thing completely: theoretical knowledge.

I decided to self teach theory as well. I bought two books: Fretboard Logic vol. I and II. I'm now working on how to build chords by the use of chord formulas (i.e. minor - 1 b3 5 etc.).

I understand this, and I can make my "own" chords now, but there is something I don't understand.

When you compose, you play in a certain key. Say C.

Now, when I want to solo, I should, for instance, use the C major scale, right? Or the minor pentatonic scale, starting on the note C. I know 5 shapes of pentatonic, can I just use em all as long as the root note is C?

My other question is this: when I want compose a rythm guitar line, should I only use notes from the key of C? Does this mean that I can play a power chord on the 10th fret 6th string (D), but not on the 9th 6th string (C#)?

Thanks in advance for helping a confused Dutch dude out

~DutchDude
#2
well, the key can't just be c. it is either c major c minor theres alot more but u get the idea... if the key is c major then u would solo on ionian starting on c... if it was c minor then u would use aeolian starting on c... it gets more complex than that but its a good start
#3
Yes of course, sorry, forgot about major and minor for a moment. So if I would use C Major as a key, I'd use the notes C D E F G A and B. That would also apply to power chords for the rythm guitar?

I don't know anything about modes yet though. If I'd solo over the C major key I could for instance play in the pentatonic scale starting on the 8th fret 6th string, right?
Thanks for helping a noobie out

~DutchDude
#4
The scale that you use, and how you phrase things, will depend on the kind of music that you play.

It could be more useful to approach theory from the other end, if you will. Try taking some songs and pieces you love and analysing them. Work out the chord progression and what's going on there (any portions of the circle of fifths? Any modulation?). Then transcribe the melody and backing vocals/instruments if there are any. How do the two relate to each other? What does the whole band do to change how the song feels - what kind of dynamics do they use?

Answer these questions about one song, and you'll be able to see similarities and differences in other songs, from a theoretical standpoint.

This might be useful: http://oyc.yale.edu/music/listening-to-music/
#5
Quote by TehDutchDude
Yes of course, sorry, forgot about major and minor for a moment. So if I would use C Major as a key, I'd use the notes C D E F G A and B. That would also apply to power chords for the rythm guitar?

I don't know anything about modes yet though. If I'd solo over the C major key I could for instance play in the pentatonic scale starting on the 8th fret 6th string, right?
Thanks for helping a noobie out

~DutchDude
Don't worry about modes for now. You don't need them. Look into them when you know the major and minor scales inside out and are ready to learn something new.

Yes, if you are in C Major you would primarily use the C Maj scale, or C Maj pentatonic (whihc is just the C Maj scale with the 4th and 7th scale degrees omitted), and you'd use the notes form the C Maj scale to form your chords, power chords, riffs etc. And you can use the notes anywhere you can find them on the neck - whihc means yes you can use all 5 pentatonic shapes.

You don't have to limit yourself to those notes tho - if you think another note sounds good you can still use it. Theory isn't a set of rules - its more an accumulated knowledge base, and a way of explaining music. If you think you are using a note or chord that doesn't fit in with music theory it just means you don't know enough theory to explain it yet.
#6
Quote by TehDutchDude

When you compose, you play in a certain key. Say C.

Now, when I want to solo, I should, for instance, use the C major scale, right? Or the minor pentatonic scale, starting on the note C. I know 5 shapes of pentatonic, can I just use em all as long as the root note is C?

My other question is this: when I want compose a rythm guitar line, should I only use notes from the key of C? Does this mean that I can play a power chord on the 10th fret 6th string (D), but not on the 9th 6th string (C#)?

Thanks in advance for helping a confused Dutch dude out

~DutchDude


If you are in the key of C then the C major scale will certainly work, although its not the only option. If you prefer to use the pentatonic scale then you could use the C Major pentatonic scale, which is the same exact notes as the A minor pentatonic.... You COULD use the C minor pent scale over a chord progession in the key of C but if you are playing major chords then it will sound a little dissonant, although that may be the sound you are going for.

As for the rhythm, in short... yes. Although you could get into some more advanced concepts like modulation and key changes.

Ofcourse, the real test is not weather it works out in music theory, but how it sounds to your ears! Why not try it out and see?
#7
Stop flooding this poor guy with too much information. You gotta learn how to crawl before you can walk.

(Listen to AirForge)
#8
Okay, I just wrote some sickass solo in Guitar Pro. Can't play it myself, but all the notes in it are either A, B, C, D, E, F or G. I included some sweeping (an E and an A minor chord). The rythm line plays some power and barre chords, all without any sharps or flats. Did I "do it right"?

edit: it sounds pretty badass... no notes that sound like they are "lost" in my composition.
Last edited by TehDutchDude at Dec 9, 2009,
#11
Quote by TehDutchDude
Hey guys, I've been self teaching guitar for 10 months now. Been making great progress, everyone around me says that I'm talented (I just think I practise a lot - at least 2 hours daily). I can mess around on the guitar quite nicely, yet I lack one thing completely: theoretical knowledge.

I decided to self teach theory as well. I bought two books: Fretboard Logic vol. I and II. I'm now working on how to build chords by the use of chord formulas (i.e. minor - 1 b3 5 etc.).

I understand this, and I can make my "own" chords now, but there is something I don't understand.

When you compose, you play in a certain key. Say C.

Now, when I want to solo, I should, for instance, use the C major scale, right? Or the minor pentatonic scale, starting on the note C. I know 5 shapes of pentatonic, can I just use em all as long as the root note is C?

My other question is this: when I want compose a rythm guitar line, should I only use notes from the key of C? Does this mean that I can play a power chord on the 10th fret 6th string (D), but not on the 9th 6th string (C#)?

Thanks in advance for helping a confused Dutch dude out

~DutchDude


In my opinion the construction of chords by intervals of Major and minor 3rds is clunky, but many people espouse this kind of approach. I only say this because I am able to teach all triads in about 4 lessons and never do I use the "stacking" formulae to do so. I'm not saying that there's no merit in learning the stacking, but to me, compared to my method its like running by dragging one leg behind me.

Its like if you asked me what letter in the alphabet came after R and I started at A and recited my ABC's to get to that information. By contrast, my method is as simple as saying "S. I invite you to look at my instant chord demo which can be found by clicking the link below and looking at the other videos Ive put up.

In my online course, I can get you there in a 4-5 lesson module and you'll have it forever, never once stacking intervals to get there. Takes too long and is wholly unneccesary to meet this objective.

Now to answer your questions:

1. If all your chords are in the key of C, then you should be able to solo just fine in C major

2. You can also compose on the Minor Pent, as long as the 2nd note is C - If you make the root note C in MINOR pentatonic you're in a minor scale which clashes with a major key.

3. You can chain all of the 5 pentatonic shapes together as you always have as long as youve started out correctly, the pattern will be consistent.

4. You could play anything you like, but keep in mind a C# power chord will sound "off" to the ears, as it is not in the key. However you might just use it as a passing chord and settle on a more stable chord, so the "off" sounding chord is for a split second.

I hope this helps answer your questions.

Confusion and such is exactly why I have come to this site, to help people and to shine the light and hopefully help people see that there is a method that doesnt have to take years, that is unique and is unlike anything else, that will get you the answers of all these questions, make theory painless, and ultimately make you self sufficient on the guitar in terms of playing for the rest of your life.

Sean
#12
Quote by TehDutchDude
Okay, I just wrote some sickass solo in Guitar Pro. Can't play it myself, but all the notes in it are either A, B, C, D, E, F or G. I included some sweeping (an E and an A minor chord). The rythm line plays some power and barre chords, all without any sharps or flats. Did I "do it right"?

edit: it sounds pretty badass... no notes that sound like they are "lost" in my composition.



Its diatonic, so every note will sound like it fits. The fact that there are no sharps or flats means that your rhythm is congruent with the notes that you are playing as a lead. You could also go hog wild on a keyboard and never hit a black key and solo like a mad man and nothing will clash.
#13
Quote by Sean0913
I
3. You can chain all of the 5 pentatonic shapes together as you always have as long as youve started out correctly, the pattern will be consistent.



Ah thanks, I was just about to ask this! If you can chain em all together you really instantly get a lot more options without much thinking... nice!

I am definately going to check out your vids tomorrow evening

~DutchDude
#14
Quote by jneal1221
well, the key can't just be c. it is either c major c minor
Generally when someone says only "C," it's implied that they mean C major.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#15
Quote by Sean0913
In my opinion the construction of chords by intervals of Major and minor 3rds is clunky, but many people espouse this kind of approach. I only say this because I am able to teach all triads in about 4 lessons and never do I use the "stacking" formulae to do so. I'm not saying that there's no merit in learning the stacking, but to me, compared to my method its like running by dragging one leg behind me.

Its like if you asked me what letter in the alphabet came after R and I started at A and recited my ABC's to get to that information. By contrast, my method is as simple as saying "S. I invite you to look at my instant chord demo which can be found by clicking the link below and looking at the other videos Ive put up.
I think stacking 3rds is the easiest way to form chords on the run - especially triads and arpeggios. A major chord is a maj 3rd plus a min 3rd, so wherever you are on the neck if you know how to find intervals you can play a Maj triad and a Major arp. Same for min, half dim, dim, aug etc - all you gotta do to form them quickly is know how to find maj and min 3rds on the neck. Don't write it off - you might find a lot of students find it handy.
#18
Quote by motoko
quartal harmony is pretty easy too
stacking intervals then
#19
Remember this...in Western Music when you learn "music theory" it's called "Diatonic Theory" and is an organization of notes and many ways they can be organized, named, and compared. But Music Theory IS NOT Music, it's a tool to help you understand musical concept and communicate them to others.

Learning the theory definitely puts your head in a a great direction for understanding how things relate in an organized fashion (Intervals, Chord Construction, and Diatonic Theory are the basics). But there are other advanced concepts that help you understand "Music" and what's at play in a song (Melody, Harmony, Major and Minor Keys, Written Keys verses scale being used, Relative Keys, Cadences, Tension and Release, Borrowed chords, Tonal Centers, Modal music, a Key is not necessarily a scale, the notes that aren't in the scale are just as important as the notes that are in the scale, etc...).

Without a firm understanding of the basics you may never understand why songs contain what they contain (chords not in the Key, and notes not in the Key, and why and how that can be).

So with all this, just because you are in the Key of C Major, it does not necessarily mean the C Major notes are the ONLY notes you will use for melody or solo'ing, nor does it mean the only chords you will use are ONLY chords built with in the C Major scale.

A good rule of thumb starting out is to remember this...with scales you do not what to use all of the notes of the scale all of the time, but instead it's a groups of notes you'll want to use some of the notes from.

If you have a weekend available I have a bunch of tutorials that can help you with these ideas.

Basics:

Intervals http://lessons.mikedodge.com/lessons/MusicTheory/Intervals/IntervalsTOC.htm
Chord Construction http://lessons.mikedodge.com/lessons/MusicTheory/ChdCon/ChdConTOC.htm
Diatonic Theory http://lessons.mikedodge.com/lessons/MusicTheory/Diatonic/DiatonicTOC.htm
How to find what Key you are in http://lessons.mikedodge.com/lessons/MusicTheory/Diatonic/WhatKey.htm
Explanation of Modes within a progression http://lessons.mikedodge.com/lessons/MusicTheory/Diatonic/ModalExample1.htm

For more advanced concepts and application and how it all ties together:

http://lessons.mikedodge.com Read through the lessons in the On Topic Tutorial section.

And, if you really want some in depth application info go here: http://mikedodge.freeforums.org/one-off-lessons-and-concepts-f2.html?sid=77c391b031abbb89a1a5a8c836f7bf14

You find everything from playing over changes, quartal chords, song analysis, concepts relating to different advanced players, and much, much more.

Knock yourself out.
#20
Quote by zhilla
I think stacking 3rds is the easiest way to form chords on the run - especially triads and arpeggios. A major chord is a maj 3rd plus a min 3rd, so wherever you are on the neck if you know how to find intervals you can play a Maj triad and a Major arp. Same for min, half dim, dim, aug etc - all you gotta do to form them quickly is know how to find maj and min 3rds on the neck. Don't write it off - you might find a lot of students find it handy.


OK. How long does it take for someone reasonably to learn all their 3rds on all pairs of strings so they can do as you described, on the neck on the fly?

Keep in mind:

1. You have to know the musical alphabet
2. You have to memorize to the point of total recall, the notes on the neck
3. You have to memorize to the point of total recall, the theoretical formula in 3rds for each triad type
4. You have to memorize to the point of instant recall, the shape intervals on all strings on the guitar for major and minor thirds

So, how long would that take someone, reasonably speaking?

Consider the amount of hours of stuy and application, and then the most likely amount of time, in weeks or months given the fact that people eat and sleep and work or go to school.
Last edited by Sean0913 at Dec 10, 2009,
#21
Quote by Sean0913
OK. How long does it take for someone reasonably to learn all their 3rds on all pairs of strings so they can do as you described, on the neck on the fly?

Keep in mind:

1. You have to know the musical alphabet
2. You have to memorize to the point of total recall, the notes on the neck
3. You have to memorize to the point of total recall, the theoretical formula in 3rds for each triad type
4. You have to memorize to the point of instant recall, the shape intervals on all strings on the guitar for major and minor thirds

So, how long would that take someone, reasonably speaking?

Consider the amount of hours of stuy and application, and then the most likely amount of time, in weeks or months given the fact that people eat and sleep and work or go to school.
Eh? You don't need to know all the notes of teh neck to find a 3rd, and it isn't rocket science to remember the shape of a major 3rd and a minor 3rd - the only place they change is the B string, and provided you remember there's only a Maj 3rd between the G and B strings thats not exactly complicated.

If you can find the root note, and you can remember 2 shapes and a semitone, and that a Major chord starts with a Major 3rd (Maj 3rd + min 3rd) and a minor chord starts with a minor 3rd (min 3rd + Maj 3rd) you can work out major and minor triads and arps all over the neck. Then you just carry on the sequence for 7th chords. Aug chords are just stacked Maj 3rd, Dim chords are just stacked min chords, everything else is pretty logical to work out

I wasn't dissing your method (I couldn't if I wanted to - I haven't actually seen it ) - I was saying don't dismiss other methods. Stacking intervals works just fine for me, and I'm only a beginner in terms of playing time, so it can't take that long to learn to do it.
#22
Hmm, I really ought to read this and learn it too.

Any other books you'd recommend?
My gear:
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Got a few Muse and Rockschool Grade 3 pieces up there!
#23
Mike,

You are quickly becoming one of my favorites here, in terms of knowledge and depth of insight - you know your stuff.

I have to say I sure appreciate your pioneering spirit and willingness to help and I have perused your lessons, and noted there was very useful content such as isolating an 11th to a ii or vi, as one example of determining your modal approach to an outside chord.

Ive also perused your triad series, and I have a couple of questions.

First while your theory is spot on, my question becomes, does this information allow instant recitation of the notes within a triad, say, without the use of the guitar, or memorized shapes?

Second you showed a couple of chord fragment ideas, but certainly someone would need to know their notes on the neck to go further than that with these, would that be a fair statement?

Also you seem to have some actual schooling in theory, and are not just self taught, based upon your organization of the ideas and how you explain them. Would I be correct?

Quote by MikeDodge
Remember this...in Western Music when you learn "music theory" it's called "Diatonic Theory" and is an organization of notes and many ways they can be organized, named, and compared. But Music Theory IS NOT Music, it's a tool to help you understand musical concept and communicate them to others.

Learning the theory definitely puts your head in a a great direction for understanding how things relate in an organized fashion (Intervals, Chord Construction, and Diatonic Theory are the basics). But there are other advanced concepts that help you understand "Music" and what's at play in a song (Melody, Harmony, Major and Minor Keys, Written Keys verses scale being used, Relative Keys, Cadences, Tension and Release, Borrowed chords, Tonal Centers, Modal music, a Key is not necessarily a scale, the notes that aren't in the scale are just as important as the notes that are in the scale, etc...).

Without a firm understanding of the basics you may never understand why songs contain what they contain (chords not in the Key, and notes not in the Key, and why and how that can be).

So with all this, just because you are in the Key of C Major, it does not necessarily mean the C Major notes are the ONLY notes you will use for melody or solo'ing, nor does it mean the only chords you will use are ONLY chords built with in the C Major scale.

A good rule of thumb starting out is to remember this...with scales you do not what to use all of the notes of the scale all of the time, but instead it's a groups of notes you'll want to use some of the notes from.

If you have a weekend available I have a bunch of tutorials that can help you with these ideas.

Basics:

Intervals http://lessons.mikedodge.com/lessons/MusicTheory/Intervals/IntervalsTOC.htm
Chord Construction http://lessons.mikedodge.com/lessons/MusicTheory/ChdCon/ChdConTOC.htm
Diatonic Theory http://lessons.mikedodge.com/lessons/MusicTheory/Diatonic/DiatonicTOC.htm
How to find what Key you are in http://lessons.mikedodge.com/lessons/MusicTheory/Diatonic/WhatKey.htm
Explanation of Modes within a progression http://lessons.mikedodge.com/lessons/MusicTheory/Diatonic/ModalExample1.htm

For more advanced concepts and application and how it all ties together:

http://lessons.mikedodge.com Read through the lessons in the On Topic Tutorial section.

And, if you really want some in depth application info go here: http://mikedodge.freeforums.org/one-off-lessons-and-concepts-f2.html?sid=77c391b031abbb89a1a5a8c836f7bf14

You find everything from playing over changes, quartal chords, song analysis, concepts relating to different advanced players, and much, much more.

Knock yourself out.
#24
Quote by zhilla
Stacking intervals works just fine for me, and I'm only a beginner in terms of playing time, so it can't take that long to learn to do it.


I agree. Being aware of the stacked 3rd formulas is helpful. It's another perspective to see it from which is always a good thing.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Dec 10, 2009,
#25
Quote by zhilla
Eh? You don't need to know all the notes of teh neck....

If you can find the root note


How does one "find the root note" without knowing the notes on the neck? Do you keep a chart nearby? Or do you only use one or two strings that you know better than others the same way people use their pentatonic scales (6th string root)?

If so, then how does that trump over simply knowing all the notes on the neck and instantly being able to say any triad without even having a guitar or visual reference in hand? And as a result of knowing the notes so well, instantly being able to sight and play the root on any string on the neck and follow it with the other notes on adjacent strings?

Sean
#26
Quote by Sean0913
How does one "find the root note" without knowing the notes on the neck? Do you keep a chart nearby?


Well, a person may have the understanding to be able to "find the root note", even though they don't yet truly know every single note on the fretboard. (as in instant identification)
shred is gaudy music
#27
Quote by Sean0913
How does one "find the root note" without knowing the notes on the neck? Do you keep a chart nearby? Or do you only use one or two strings that you know better than others the same way people use their pentatonic scales (6th string root)?

If so, then how does that trump over simply knowing all the notes on the neck and instantly being able to say any triad without even having a guitar or visual reference in hand? And as a result of knowing the notes so well, instantly being able to sight and play the root on any string on the neck and follow it with the other notes on adjacent strings?

Sean
Cripes I didn't expect to get into an in depth discussion lol

I find using intervals the easiest way to find my way around the neck. Yes I know my way around in terms of note names reasonably well, but honestly I probably know about half the natural notes really well and just use intervals to find every other note. Thats just how I do it - it works for me.

My point was, if you're teaching you shouldn't dismiss any method out of hand. Some people understand things easier one way, other people will find another method easier. Its worth having other methods in the back of your mind so when someone can't get their head around your normal method you can explain things in a different way that might work for them. Don't just assume your way is best. It may well be best for you, but I can pretty much guarantee it won't be best for everybody.
#28
Fair enough. But I haven't seen any method out there or approach that surpassed mine, in all honesty. But I mean, how are *you* supposed to know that, right?

I guess my point is, that these ideas that you are saying, take a fair amount of "time" which is, in the first place why I believe, so many people take years to get there, or never get there at all. And I guess that's the reason Im asking "how long"? You can cut a tree down with a spoon, given enough swings and enough time, but then there is also a chainsaw.
#29
Quote by Sean0913
Fair enough. But I haven't seen any method out there or approach that surpassed mine, in all honesty. But I mean, how are *you* supposed to know that, right?

I guess my point is, that these ideas that you are saying, take a fair amount of "time" which is, in the first place why I believe, so many people take years to get there, or never get there at all. And I guess that's the reason Im asking "how long"? You can cut a tree down with a spoon, given enough swings and enough time, but then there is also a chainsaw.


So what is your method for building chords? we know you think it's the best method, but what is it exactly?
shred is gaudy music
#30
You haven't found a method out there that supassed yours for you.

And time is relative - its going to vary between different people depending on how they learn and how much time and effort they put into it. But I figure it can't take long to learn to stack intervals if I can do it
#31
It's really nice to see that people really do the best they can to answer my questions It is greatly appreciated guys! Music theory seems to be quite interesting, but it also seems to have a LOT of different aspects and "point of views".

What should I learn first? I'm about to work on 7th chords now, and after that I'm going to tackle diatonic scales. The book I use right now approaches the fretboard from a vision which you all probably know: the CAGED system. I'm starting to see more and more patterns and links on the fretboard, but is there anything else not connected to the CAGED system which is really, really worth looking at for a music theory nooby?
#32
If you're gonna learn 7th chords then diatonic scales I'd spend some time after that learning to harmonise your scales - by whatever method works for you

If you've used caged and understand scales and chords in terms of patterns, I'd look at them in terms of steps, intervals and notes too - the more ways you have of looking at things the better you should understand them, and the more flexibility you'll have in using them.
#33
Quote by GuitarMunky
So what is your method for building chords? we know you think it's the best method, but what is it exactly?


I'll show you the method put in action, and I can take someone and have them able to do it in 5 lessons if they do the homework.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-UfENyOJd1g

While time is relative, as zilla pointed out, I actually teach it in a finite time, as demonstrated in this video.

Sean
#34
Quote by TehDutchDude
It's really nice to see that people really do the best they can to answer my questions It is greatly appreciated guys! Music theory seems to be quite interesting, but it also seems to have a LOT of different aspects and "point of views".

What should I learn first? I'm about to work on 7th chords now, and after that I'm going to tackle diatonic scales. The book I use right now approaches the fretboard from a vision which you all probably know: the CAGED system. I'm starting to see more and more patterns and links on the fretboard, but is there anything else not connected to the CAGED system which is really, really worth looking at for a music theory nooby?


Well if you've seen my posts enough on here, you probably already know I'm going to say that the method I use works pretty darn fast. I'd say if you started with me, you'd reach proficiency in theory in a very short amount of time, relative to anything else that Ive seen.

Sean
#35
Quote by Sean0913
I'll show you the method put in action, and I can take someone and have them able to do it in 5 lessons if they do the homework.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-UfENyOJd1g

While time is relative, as zilla pointed out, I actually teach it in a finite time, as demonstrated in this video.

Sean
Not sure if you linked the vid you meant to, but that was just you demonstrating you know your triads, not your method of teaching them?
#36
Quote by zhilla
Not sure if you linked the vid you meant to, but that was just you demonstrating you know your triads, not your method of teaching them?


No what I was demonstrating in that video, is the "results" of what I teach.

So, practically speaking, and referring to your method of "stacking", can you do the same thing I demonstrated using your understanding of stacking intervals? If not, then, as you see, this is just one example of the progressive results that I am able to acheive through my series.

As far as the lessons themselves, you can learn about them, and the reason I have lessons online, through the seminar that is under my name there (and check out the demonstration also of notes on the neck)

Sean
#37
Quote by Sean0913
I'll show you the method put in action, and I can take someone and have them able to do it in 5 lessons if they do the homework.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-UfENyOJd1g

While time is relative, as zilla pointed out, I actually teach it in a finite time, as demonstrated in this video.

Sean



I mean like can you explain it to us, or are you only here to sell it?

btw, is that 5 lessons to someone who is an absolute beginner, or 5 lessons to someone that already has a basic understanding & basic skills?
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Dec 10, 2009,
#38
Quote by Sean0913
No what I was demonstrating in that video, is the "results" of what I teach.

So, practically speaking, and referring to your method of "stacking", can you do the same thing I demonstrated using your understanding of stacking intervals? If not, then, as you see, this is just one example of the progressive results that I am able to acheive through my series.

As far as the lessons themselves, you can learn about them, and the reason I have lessons online, through the seminar that is under my name there (and check out the demonstration also of notes on the neck)

Sean
Yes but not as quick - would take me a few seconds for most of them. I could write them down quicker than I could say them lol. I can play them quick enough though - which is the one thing you didn't demonstrate . Then again my teach didn't spend 5 lessons on it either. I think he spent 1 lesson on harmonising the major scale, and 1 lesson on triads and their inversions, plus a bunch of other stuff in between and since. If we'd spent 5 lessons on it I may have been able to recite them all straight off - but I would also have been bored brainless lol. I don't have the patience for that.

Anyhoo - I wasn't claiming that one method is better than another - point is that different methods work for different people. Assuming you have rl students you're gonna come across some who don't get on with your method and would benefit from other ways of learning. Don't write other methods off just because you believe you've found the perfect method for you - if you're teaching don't you have a responsibility to find what works for your students?
#39
Quote by GuitarMunky
I mean like can you explain it to us, or are you only hear to sell it?


Great question.

I am here to help answer people's theory questions. But for those who want to finally put it all together in a very short yet finite amount of time, I have an online lesson program that is subscription based, as it is active, and not to be passively read and understood. I also go into the story about being asked to publish it in a book by a couple well known music publishers, and why I said "no".

I have a seminar on YT that goes over what you will learn. And the two demonstrations, are hopefully intended to inspire others and show them that they can also do the same.

You know, there are a lot of people out there on the internet that give away their lessons for free, yet, you still see people here asking for help and needing their questions answered. I'm more than happy to help in that way too, while at the same time, letting them know, there is a way through the confusion and it doesnt have to take ages to get there?

What does that mean? Well, in short terms, you are now freed up to just PLAY and enjoy the guitar, because as a guitarist and a musician you've reached a level of self sufficiency in Chords, Scales, Composition, the Neck, Theory....so whatever direction you are ready to set off in, be it Jazz or Rock or just writing your own stuff, you have the knowledge of a musician to do so, while at the same time, you are ably applying that knowledge out of the abstract, into your guitar, without any black spots or places that are unknown to you.
#40
Quote by GuitarMunky

btw, is that 5 lessons to someone who is an absolute beginner, or 5 lessons to someone that already has a basic understanding & basic skills?


The prerequisites for that would be that you know the musical alphabet. So all your natural notes and enharmonics. That's pretty much it. Now as far as applying this to the guitar - if you know the notes on the neck it makes that information easier and more accessible when you play.
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