#1
I can't for the life of me figure out how to fix it. Even when I practice slowly, it happens (rather infrequently, though). I recently changed my technique to use the side of my thumb to mute the top strings when not in use, and I think the change has brought it about (not certain). Any ideas on what I cando to fix this?
#2
Nobody is going to be able to give you a quick fix answer. You just need to practice a lot. A lot of people (myself included) drape their thumb over the top to mute the low E string. Also, your right (picking) hand should be doing a lot of the work too. You should be able to play a scale cleanly without using your fret hand to mute...practice that.
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#3
I don't use my fretting hand to mute, its when the side of your picking hand thumb rests on the strings above that which are being played and mutes the strings.
I can play scales cleanly, too, but my pick hits the strings sometimes and I want ideas on how I can fix this.
#4
Quote by hippieboy444
I don't use my fretting hand to mute, its when the side of your picking hand thumb rests on the strings above that which are being played and mutes the strings.
I can play scales cleanly, too, but my pick hits the strings sometimes and I want ideas on how I can fix this.

If I'm understanding your problem correctly you're picking notes on one string and accidentally hitting another string with your pick (e.g. picking the A string and accidentally hitting the low E).
If so then you need to work on keeping your picking motions smaller and just practice a lot at slow speeds. There's nothing else really, just practice not hitting the other strings at slow speeds.
Speed is a by-product of shut the fuck up.
#5
No, its like when I play a sequence of notes on the G string, I get the sound of it being hit by the pick, either fast or slow. It also happens with going down one string on a downstroke and coming back up. Help?
#6
Oh, you mean like clicking sound of the pick as it hits the strings? If so then I'm not sure what to advise other than picking lighter, I pick quite loudly but it sounds good when it comes through the amp so I've not bothered about it.
Speed is a by-product of shut the fuck up.
#7
I think I know what you're talking about. Do you mean after you pick a string that your pick either touches or rubs against the string as it's ringing? Thereby giving you a buzzing sound? I know this problem all too well cause I'm a finger picker and use picks. The only way to stop this is practice practice practice. It happens to me a lot and is very frustrating. You need to remember that when you're picking a string that the motion isn't really just an up and down or up or down motion. It's actually elliptical. Pick the string then move the pick away and out from the string, then the pick comes back in an elliptical pattern. This gives the string time to ring out and your pick is away from the strings. I don't mean so far away that you can't go right back in for an attack quickly. I'm talking about a flowing but sometimes fast movement of, strike, pull out, bring the circle back to the strings. If you're only picking down and up directly perpendicular to the strings then the chances of hitting vibrating strings is greatly increased.

Watch some videos of close up right hand picking techniques from accomplished guitarists and you will see this motion I'm talking about. I've had many instructors tell me that what the picking hand does is far more important and difficult to master than what the fretting hand does. In my experience I've found this to be true.
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